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    (Original post by aggie813)
    haha, it's ture
    but
    The Elephant Man

    Blue Velvet
    Mulholland Drive
    ..........??
    since Mulholland Drive , where has Lynch been? he burnt out too!:eek2:

    anyway,
    im waiting !!
    Hmm... well he made this weird film called INLAND EMPIRE (capitals intended) last year, which hasn't gone down too well.
    Perhaps I'm being a bit harsh on Scorsese actually... The Departed wasn't too bad all things considered.
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    (Original post by wilbur)
    Hmm... well he made this weird film called INLAND EMPIRE (in capitals) last year, which hasn't gone down too well

    Perhaps I'm being a bit harsh on Scorsese actually... The Departed wasn't too bad all things considered.

    The Departedis okay

    if u haven't seen Infernal Affairs ,id recommend to u,
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    Scorsese has made some truly awesome films - altho he may not have made a classic sicne Goodfellas - I must ask how many classics you expect from one man!

    MulHolland Drive is an amazing film as well but voerall I don't think Lynch can be compared to Scorsese - I have been dying to see Inland Empire tho!
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    they are sm of the best films
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    The History Boys

    It’s Sheffield, early 1980s, and eight talented students have achieved top grades at A-level and have Oxbridge in their sights. The problem? “They’re clever but they’re crass.” So along comes Stephen Campbell Moore, a radical History teacher to change their manners, style, and even teach them to change History... Sadly, the boys’ new found adoration for History and the musings of Nietzsche mean that their interest in the lessons of homosexual teacher Hector (Richard Griffiths, excellent) is displaced, and this film, with its many themes lined up, examines the school, its students and learning History.

    The History Boys is a film I connect and love for many reasons. The performances are stellar, and Stephen Campbell Moore and Samuel Barnett are standouts in the film, for their portrayals of the creative, innovative teacher and the sweet, sensitive gay teenager respectively. Samuel Barnett especially; he basically owned this movie, and every scene that he was in, I adored. He gives his gawky character such a tenderness of spirit and kind soul that it’s impossible not to love him.


    But every member of the cast is a treat to watch; Dominic Cooper embracing the lead with vivacity, charm, and that raffish charm of an 80s teenager. Richard Griffiths is also excellent, and lends some warmth to his potentially disturbing portrayal of a man with an unnatural penchant for groping his students in return for a student-led lesson such as “How to use the present subjunctive in a French brothel”. The cast bind the wonderful Alan Bennett script together beautifully, and the chemistry and rapport between all the characters is unmatched, natural, and a total delight to watch. This by-the-book adaptation of Bennett’s play doesn’t add anything to the play, but that’s simply a good thing, because the genius and vibrancy of the play is fabulous already.

    Though depicting a High school in the 80s, I could still connect with this movie with my 21st century ideals. The teacher/student frictions and development of their relationship and respect is well-drawn and intelligent. The wit in which the process of getting into Oxbridge is shown, is reflective of nowadays, and there are one-liners here that are bound to raise a smile (“History? It’s just one f-cking thing after another, isn’t it?). Lastly, a cool 80s soundtrack guides our protagonists through the story with ease and warmth.

    A fantastically enjoyable, uplifting experience, The History Boys can be enjoyed by everyone, from a Cambridge-educated boffin to someone who just wants a laugh. You’ll end up being drawn in by each character, hoping for their successes, and being moved by the relationships depicted in the movie. The best film of the year so far; it even makes you remember the good things about History...

    A-
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    Added. Thanx.
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    Name of the Film: Hide and Seek (2005)

    Spoiler:
    Show


    ⿿Come out, come out, wherever you are!⿿ That command is familiar to everyone who has played the children⿿s game, Hide and Seek. The words and game take us back to an innocent carefree time in our lives, where the simple goal was to find hiding playmates. Many children could even enjoy a spirited game with imaginary friends. But then, imaginary friends can sometimes seem so real⿦For young Emily Callaway, her games of Hide and Seek with an imaginary friend named Charlie have become anything but simple and innocent. Instead, she finds herself in the middle of a series of increasingly nightmarish acts that even her father David cannot stop. Who--or what--is Charlie? David wonders. How can an ⿿imaginary⿿ entity have this kind of hold on her? Maybe Charlie is not imaginary at all, but instead a flesh-and-blood, malevolent presence?


    What you liked about the film: I thought the acting was very good especially Dakota Fanning. I liked the plot as well, it was a film that made you think rather than you just watch and is easy to understand. It did also make me jump at times. The editing and the music was also good.

    What you disliked about the film:
    There weren't enought parts in the film that made me jump however there were a few scenes that did. The plot got slightly confusing in the end however I did manage to understand it in the end The film at the beginning was also a bit slow and I felt everything happened in the last 30-45 minutes.

    Rating out of 10: 7
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    Name of the Film: Stranger Than Fiction

    What you liked about the film: The concept was interesting, but to continue that sentence I'd have to dip into the next section. Not having Will Ferrel acting like an idiot for once was also a plus.

    What you disliked about the film: The concept was interesting.... but incredibly poorly executed. Just like the book in the story, this film didn't know whether it was a comedy or a tragedy. The subject matter is far too silly to make a serious drama out of, and yet they try to anyway. It could have made an excellent light-hearted comedy, but no. Why not? No idea. Usually the typical formula for this kind of film goes something like - funny concept, makes us laugh for 45 minutes, while endearing us to the characters, then eventually something serious happens, and we at least mildly care about it because we've gotten to know the characters, then it ends relatively happily with some more laughs. This film, however, just decided to skip the first step. Despite having a concept with the potential to be extremely funny, as the advert showed (although the advert is just a complete, outright lie. All the clips that are played for humour in the trailer, are for some inconceivable reason played for tragedy in the film itself), but straight away Will Ferrel seems to take the whole "voice narrating his life" thing far too seriously, (rather than making us laugh he just straight away goes to see a psychologist, and spends the rest of the film obsessing about it and whinging "I don't want to die!", and not in a funny way) which leads the rest of the film to take itself far too seriously as well, resulting in a dull, pretentious hour and a half.
    Spoiler:
    Show
    The icing on the cake of this self-praising dribble is when Dustin Hoffman, a literary expert, procalaims the book being written by the author, played by Emma Thompson, to be the finest piece of english literature ever written, and tells Will Ferrel that he has to agree to die so that she can publish the ending, because it is so perfect the way everything comes together that it simply can't end any other way, and that this book will change the world forever. We see the ending, and it's crap. Now this is really getting into the plot, so be warned that there are spoilers, but it's not anything you smart people of TSR wouldn't work out for yourselves anyway. The ending basically comes about because his watch stopped at the beginning of the film, the guy next to him told him the wrong time so he re-set his watch 3 minutes later, he then arrives at the bus stop three minutes early rather than late as usual, in time to save a kid from being hit by a bus and getting hit himself. Apparently that is the best ending ever written, and will change the course of literature forever. HOWEVER, the film THEN goes on to say that he didn't die, and he's in hospital. We then get a montage of non-speaking characters from throughout the film, seen doing the one thing we saw them each doing, and this is supposed to create some kind of appearance of some huge pattern or tapestry where we're all connected in some way, and where everything is always nicely tied up, but it's not. It really is not. Dustin Hoffman then goes on to tell Emma Thompson that her ending didn't make sense with the rest of the book, and we're sat there going "YES! WE KNOW!" but the thing is, the other "genius" ending wasn't any better either!



    Rating out of 10: I was going to give this a 6 out of 10, but after writing this review I've since realised there really wasn't much good about it. I give it a 5. Because although I was bored, it was never to anger or tears, and I didn't feel a HUGE urge to walk out.
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    everyone writes a lot more than me
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    (Original post by lil_groovy_dude)
    everyone writes a lot more than me
    Quality not quantity.
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    (Original post by LPK)
    Quality not quantity.
    ^^ :p:

    I'm watching Brokeback Mountain tonight. Should be good and not just because of the nudity.

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    (Original post by lil_groovy_dude)
    ^^ :p:

    I'm watching Brokeback Mountain tonight. Should be good and not just because of the nudity.

    You just want to see the sex. :eek:
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    (Original post by LPK)
    You just want to see the sex. :eek:
    How did you know :eek4: :p:
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    (Original post by LPK)
    Quality not quantity.
    Ditto....if you can get the same amount of information across in fewer words, you'ev done something well.

    And Brokeback Mountain = boring as hell. But then again, I think the Godfather's boring...so you could use that to gauge how much my opinion means to you
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    (Original post by Jayk Bakner)
    Ditto....if you can get the same amount of information across in fewer words, you'ev done something well.

    And Brokeback Mountain = boring as hell. But then again, I think the Godfather's boring...so you could use that to gauge how much my opinion means to you
    Godfather was sh*te though :p:
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    (Original post by lil_groovy_dude)
    Godfather was sh*te though :p:
    *high fives*

    Well, it wasn't ****e, it was just a bit boring!
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    Name of the Film: The Prestige (2006, Christopher Nolan)

    Christopher Nolan. That name can (and probably does) invoke a number of different reactions from a number of different people. Some people will say 'oh him! He made Batman cool again!'. Others will say '******* confused the **** out of me!'. Other people will say 'Who?'. Either way, people generally think well of him (except, of course, the latter bunch; they don't have any opinion...). And they probably won't be disappointed with The Prestige.

    Set in the backdrop of Victorian London, the story opens with stage magician Alfred Borden (Christian Bale) on trial for the murder of 'fellow' magician Robert Angier (Hugh Jackman). The plot thickens through a series of flashbacks, and we find that it isn't quite as clear cut as we might think. It's difficult to sum up this subtle piece of storytelling, but that's the best I can manage; and all I can really say is that you have to see it to truly get it!

    The first thing that I simply have to mention is the subtlety of Nolan's direction. In a word, it's simply magnificent; like a true magician, he pulls you in to the trick; he shows you things and then quickly takes them away, leaving you wondering what the hell it was you just saw, and keeping you guessing until the final part of the trick...sorry, movie; the reveal; the prestige of the thing. But, as always, this isn't solely down to brilliant direction. It's also down to the actors, and they do such a fine job; adding to the overall mystery of the movie, and giving their characters the required depth and more importantly, their subtlely concealed layers.

    Another impressive feat is the maintaining of this odd, harrowing mood to the film; and this is mostly thanks to first - and to a lesser extent - the slightly gothic setting, and secondly to the photography. The tone is dark, with slightly washed out colours and stark contrasts between the characters and their backgrounds. The camera is rarely stationary either, always on the move, always dynamic, and this stops you, as a viewer, from settling back into auto-pilot, keeping us on our toes and looking for the plot twists, and adding to the atmosphere of the movie as a whole.

    The acting is, as I said, rather good. Christian Bale - once you get past the slightly over the top cockney accent - is both endearing and mysterious as Borden; Hugh Jackman delivers a subtle and affecting portrayal of Angier - who is on the tragic end of the aforementioned tragedy, and becomes increasingly sour as the movie progresses. Leading the supporting cast are Michael Caine - for once not doing a Michael Caine impression for his character - as Angier's trick-engineer, and Scarlett Johansson doing a damn fine job of mastering a British accent (there are a few shaky moments, but overall she holds her own) in her role as Angier's glamorous assistant. Perhaps one of the more ingenious castings was David Bowie as the elusive Tesla; he brings a strange, slightly harrowing performance to the role which in the long run is more or less a good thing.

    Now, one of the problems with reviewing this movie is that if I go in to too much depth, I'll give the story away - and trust me, this is one that you'll want to go in to more or less unspoiled - so I'm just going to stop now. Let's just leave it at the fact that this is a brilliant movie, with more twists and turns than seven crazy straws linked together. It's well played, and fantastically directed. See it. Talk about it with your friends, start arguing. See it again!

    Rating Out of Ten: 8
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    (Original post by Jayk Bakner)
    Saw The Prestige slightly illegally, and seeing as it ain't been review, here we go!

    Name of the Film: The Prestige (2006, Christopher Nolan)

    Christopher Nolan. That name can (and probably does) invoke a number of different reactions from a number of different people. Some people will say 'oh him! He made Batman cool again!'. Others will say '******* confused the **** out of me!'. Other people will say 'Who?'. Either way, people generally think well of him (expect, of course, the latter bunch; they don't have any opinion...). And they probably won't be disappointed with The Prestige.

    Set in the backdrop of Victorian London, the story opens with stage magician Alfred Borden (Christian Bale) on trial for the murder of 'fellow' magician Rupert Angier (Hugh Jackman). The plot thickens through a series of flashbacks, and we find that it isn't quite as clear cut as we might think. It's difficult to truly sum up this subtle piece of storytelling, but that's the best I can manage; and all I can really say is that you have to see it to truly get it!

    The first thing that I simply have to mention is the subtlety of Nolan's direction. In a word, it's simply magnificent; like a true magician, he pulls you in to the trick; he shows you things and then quickly takes them away, leaving you wondering what the hell it was you just saw, and keeping you guessing until the final part of the trick...sorry, movie; the reveal; the prestige of the thing. But, as always, this isn't solely down to brilliant direction. It's also down to the actors, and they do such a fine job; adding to the overall mystery of the movie, and giving their characters the required depth and more importantly, their subtlely concealed layers.

    Another impressive feat is the maintaining of this odd, harrowing mood to the film; and this is mostly thanks to first - and to a lesser extent - the slightly gothic setting, and secondly to the photography. The tone is dark, with slightly washed out colours and stark contrasts between the characters and their backgrounds. The camera is rarely stationary either, always on the move, always dynamic, and this stop you, as a viewer, from settling back into auto-pilot, keeping us on our toes and looking for the plot twists, and adding to the atmosphere of the movie as a whole.

    The acting is, as I said, rather good. Christian Bale - once you get past the slightly over the top cockney accent - is both endearing and mysterious as Borden; Hugh Jackman understates his 'box-office star' status to deliver a subtle and affecting portrayal of Angier - who is on the tragic end of the aforementioned tragedy, and becomes increasingly sour as the movie progresses. Leading the supporting cast are Michael Caine - for once not doing a Michael Caine impression for his character - as Angier's trick-engineer, and Scarlett Johansson doing a damn fine job of mastering a British accent (there are a few shaky moments, but overall she holds her own) in her role as Angier's glamorous assistant. Perhaps one of the more ingenious castings was David Bowie as the elusive Tesla; he brings a strange, slightly harrowing performance to the role which in the long run is more or less a good thing.

    Now, one of the problems with reviewing this movie is that if I go in to too much depth, I'll give the story away - and trust me, this is one that you'll want to go in to more or less unspoiled - so I'm just going to stop now. Let's just leave it at the fact that this is a brilliant movie, with more twists and turns than seven crazy straws linked together. It's well played, and fantastically directed. See it. Talk about it with your friends, start arguing. See it again!

    Rating Out of Ten: 8
    hi ross, ill definitely check that out- sounds really good
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    (Original post by unfinished sympathy)
    hi ross, ill definitely check that out- sounds really good
    Gemma! You be back! :hugs:
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    (Original post by Jayk Bakner)
    Gemma! You be back! :hugs:
    yep i is back :hugs: how ya been?
 
 
 
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