Outline and evaluate the effects of institutionalisation - 12 marker Watch

Saif95
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Feedback wanted -- how many marks for A01 and A02 anD overall?
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Hodges and Tizard conducted a longitudal study following 65 GB children from early life to adolescence. They had been institutionalised when they were less that 4 months old. At this age children had not yet formed attachments. The children were assessed at regular intervals up to the age of 16. Some of the children remained at the institution while others had left and had to be either adopted or restored to their original families. Restored children were less likely to form attachments but adopted children were attached like normal children. However, both groups of ex institutionalised children had problems with peers. These findings suggest that early privation had a negative effect on the ability to form relationships even when given good emotional care. This supports Bowlby's theory of sensitive period. There was another study conducted by Stout, Stout conducted a study of Romanian orphans who had experienced severe conditions and found that they later suffered permanent psychological damage, including no ability to interact with people and increased aggression. AO1

Psychologists successfully showed the impacts of institutionalisation; a strength of Hodges and Tizards study was that it was longitudinal so the researchers were able to see how the institution affected the children over many years. However a weakness of this longitudinal method involves attrition, where many of the children may have left the study because they were well adjusted, therefore resulting in a biased remaining sample - children with pleasant behaviour are more likely to be adopted. Some research suggests that individuals who do not form a primary attachment within the early sensitive period are unable to recover, however, in the study of romanian orphans, one third recovered well therefore privation alone cannot explain negative outcomes. Institutuionalised children such as these can develop attachment disorder; this is due to the effects of privated infants who've not had an attachment figure. There are two types of attachment disorder they are inhibited and disinhibited. Poor parenting can also be a result; Quinton showed that ex institutionalised women often had difficulties as parents. This research shows that children who lack early attachments are likely to experience permanent emotional and social difficulties later in life although these effects may be less severe if subsequent emotional care is given. AO2
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Saif95
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Anyone?
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Saif95
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bump
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Saif95
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mclovin123
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(Original post by Saif95)
Feedback wanted -- how many marks for A01 and A02 anD overall?
Thanks


Hodges and Tizard conducted a longitudal study following 65 GB children from early life to adolescence. They had been institutionalised when they were less that 4 months old. At this age children had not yet formed attachments. The children were assessed at regular intervals up to the age of 16. Some of the children remained at the institution while others had left and had to be either adopted or restored to their original families. Restored children were less likely to form attachments but adopted children were attached like normal children. However, both groups of ex institutionalised children had problems with peers. These findings suggest that early privation had a negative effect on the ability to form relationships even when given good emotional care. This supports Bowlby's theory of sensitive period. There was another study conducted by Stout, Stout conducted a study of Romanian orphans who had experienced severe conditions and found that they later suffered permanent psychological damage, including no ability to interact with people and increased aggression. AO1

Psychologists successfully showed the impacts of institutionalisation; a strength of Hodges and Tizards study was that it was longitudinal so the researchers were able to see how the institution affected the children over many years. However a weakness of this longitudinal method involves attrition, where many of the children may have left the study because they were well adjusted, therefore resulting in a biased remaining sample - children with pleasant behaviour are more likely to be adopted. Some research suggests that individuals who do not form a primary attachment within the early sensitive period are unable to recover, however, in the study of romanian orphans, one third recovered well therefore privation alone cannot explain negative outcomes. Institutuionalised children such as these can develop attachment disorder; this is due to the effects of privated infants who've not had an attachment figure. There are two types of attachment disorder they are inhibited and disinhibited. Poor parenting can also be a result; Quinton showed that ex institutionalised women often had difficulties as parents. This research shows that children who lack early attachments are likely to experience permanent emotional and social difficulties later in life although these effects may be less severe if subsequent emotional care is given. AO2
You need to write more, and also you MUST be a little more detailed. For example, mention they were checked by hodges and tizard first at 8 years then 16, mention their situation changed at 4 years old, and delve deeper and mention that 25 were restored to their biological parents, 33 were adopted, and 7 remained in care.

I would give you at best a D on this.
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Saif95
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U sure??
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Saif95
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bump..need better feedback and more accurate mark
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JustinTiller
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I'd give you at least 8 out of 12 because this is a hard 12 marker, it varies greatly to the other 12 markers I've been given as you're only provided with two studies for institutionalisation by the specification and there is no non-study related information about institutionalisation either. I'm not sure really as I've just done it myself, it's a hard one because I found little A02 to put down and padded it out with mainly detailed A01.
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Plmoknijbuhv
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Would the Skeels and Dye (1939) study into reversing the effects of deprivation also be relevant in a question asking for research into the effects of institutionalisation?
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MissResetti
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(Original post by Saif95)
Feedback wanted -- how many marks for A01 and A02 anD overall?
Thanks

Hodges and Tizard conducted a longitudal study following 65 GB children from early life to adolescence. They had been institutionalised when they were less that 4 months old. At this age children had not yet formed attachments. The children were assessed at regular intervals up to the age of 16. Some of the children remained at the institution while others had left and had to be either adopted or restored to their original families. Restored children were less likely to form attachments but adopted children were attached like normal children. However, both groups of ex institutionalised children had problems with peers. These findings suggest that early privation had a negative effect on the ability to form relationships even when given good emotional care. This supports Bowlby's theory of sensitive period. There was another study conducted by Stout, Stout conducted a study of Romanian orphans who had experienced severe conditions and found that they later suffered permanent psychological damage, including no ability to interact with people and increased aggression. AO1

Psychologists successfully showed the impacts of institutionalisation; a strength of Hodges and Tizards study was that it was longitudinal so the researchers were able to see how the institution affected the children over many years. However a weakness of this longitudinal method involves attrition, where many of the children may have left the study because they were well adjusted, therefore resulting in a biased remaining sample - children with pleasant behaviour are more likely to be adopted. Some research suggests that individuals who do not form a primary attachment within the early sensitive period are unable to recover, however, in the study of romanian orphans, one third recovered well therefore privation alone cannot explain negative outcomes. Institutuionalised children such as these can develop attachment disorder; this is due to the effects of privated infants who've not had an attachment figure. There are two types of attachment disorder they are inhibited and disinhibited. Poor parenting can also be a result; Quinton showed that ex institutionalised women often had difficulties as parents. This research shows that children who lack early attachments are likely to experience permanent emotional and social difficulties later in life although these effects may be less severe if subsequent emotional care is given. AO2
I would say this would get 12 marks - You have mentioned that it was a longitudal study following 65 British children - in A02 you could have mentioned that it was only a small sample - therefore cannot be generalised, additionally that it was only a British study. You mentioned Bowlbys study, and the sensitive period - you could elaberate on that, however you've also mentioned the Romanian orphan study. You mention a variety of studies, and all of them show you understand the studies, the answer is well written, I think you should get 12 marks over all.

Good luck in your exam, I'm sure you'll smash it
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Fenicoteri
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I would also say this is 12/12, good luck
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