The NHS kills an elderly lady; when will it be scrapped? Watch

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Otkem
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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-s...wales-16533134

And this is in a part of the UK with more socialised medicine than England. In my opinion, the word 'incompetence' is etched across the NHS. These kind of stories are becoming too much of a common occurence. I mean how the ****ing hell do you take out the wrong organ?

What would you do to remedy the situation? My solution would be to privatise the whole thing, as when a hospital is more concerned about attracting patients as a method of funding rather than relying on taxpayer handouts, they won't so half-soaked as to take out your liver instead of your kidney.
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Bishy786
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(Original post by Otkem)
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-s...wales-16533134

And this is in a part of the UK with more socialised medicine than England. In my opinion, the word 'incompetence' is etched across the NHS. These kind of stories are becoming too much of a common occurence? I mean how the ****ing hell do you take out the wrong organ?

What would you do to remedy the situation? My solution would be to privatise the whole thing, as when a hospital is more concerned about attracting patients as a method of funding rather than relying on taxpayer handouts, they won't so half-soaked as to take out your liver instead of your kidney.
What about all the other patients that they have cured or made their passing easier?

or All those that have passed away who had no family and came to rely on the NHS for support?

One terrible thing does not mean you scrap the whole thing although I do concede that it would be more efficient.
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Classical Liberal
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There does seem to be a serious problem of accoutability in the NHS. The Stafford hospital deparcle is a prime example.
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Architecture-er
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If the internet reported on every person the NHS helped / saved - we'd be inundated with the mass of it.

Nothing is perfect, but the infrequent bad events always stand out and make people break out the pitchforks :rolleyes:
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moonkatt
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Yeah it's the NHS's fault the patient had abnormal anatomy that caused a consultant surgeon to struggle with a procedure he's familiar with. :rolleyes:

At least our surgeons don't go round carving their initials into patients:

http://www.nytimes.com/2000/02/12/ny...t-in-skin.html
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Besakt
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(Original post by Otkem)
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-s...wales-16533134

And this is in a part of the UK with more socialised medicine than England. In my opinion, the word 'incompetence' is etched across the NHS. These kind of stories are becoming too much of a common occurence. I mean how the ****ing hell do you take out the wrong organ?

What would you do to remedy the situation? My solution would be to privatise the whole thing, as when a hospital is more concerned about attracting patients as a method of funding rather than relying on taxpayer handouts, they won't so half-soaked as to take out your liver instead of your kidney.
Do you really think mistakes by surgeons wouldn't happen in a free market?
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S_Azizi
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The pros of the NHS outweigh the cons of the NHS 10 to 1...easily.
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Otkem
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(Original post by moonkatt)
Yeah it's the NHS's fault the patient had abnormal anatomy that caused a consultant surgeon to struggle with a procedure he's familiar with. :rolleyes:

At least our surgeons don't go round carving their initials into patients:

http://www.nytimes.com/2000/02/12/ny...t-in-skin.html
No, our doctors are too busy murdering them. Was it 300 that Harold Shipman killed?
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Mr Dangermouse
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Look one accident happened. Tragic and lessons must be learned but one of these lessons isn't removing healthcare from millions of Britons.
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Mr Dangermouse
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(Original post by Otkem)
No, our doctors are too busy murdering them. Was it 300 that Harold Shipman killed?
One incident. You know how many doctors the NHS employs?
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Silkielemon
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(Original post by Otkem)
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-s...wales-16533134

And this is in a part of the UK with more socialised medicine than England. In my opinion, the word 'incompetence' is etched across the NHS. These kind of stories are becoming too much of a common occurence. I mean how the ****ing hell do you take out the wrong organ?

What would you do to remedy the situation? My solution would be to privatise the whole thing, as when a hospital is more concerned about attracting patients as a method of funding rather than relying on taxpayer handouts, they won't so half-soaked as to take out your liver instead of your kidney.
Because, humans are not laid out nicely inside. It's messy, it's all red and even experienced members of staff can make mistakes.

Honestly, WHY do you think this wouldn't happen in a private system? What makes it better? Being more expensive and inhumane to the poorer members of society?

You regularly make threads picking a choosing cases, do you want me to find the equivalent from America (privatised)? Do you want me to a make a thread EVERY SINGLE TIME someone is treated with no problems?

**** happens, they will be held accountable, it's ruddy unfortunate and I'm sure everyone involved in it feels bloody awful. Why would them having more money affect the outcome?
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moonkatt
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(Original post by Otkem)
No, our doctors are too busy murdering them. Was it 300 that Harold Shipman killed?

:yawn: yeah, because that was the fault of the NHS too wasn't it.

Tell you what, with all your wisdom about the NHS explain to me exactly how socialised medicine was the cause of Harold Shipman being a murderer.
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modini
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So let's say a person really badly needs a kidney, but is too poor to pay for the treatment. That person will die without even an attempt at having his life saved. Would you rather that system was adopted?

And wait, how is this the NHS's fault? It's the surgeon's mistake. How would that have been avoided under private care?
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withas
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(Original post by Otkem)
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-s...wales-16533134

And this is in a part of the UK with more socialised medicine than England. In my opinion, the word 'incompetence' is etched across the NHS. These kind of stories are becoming too much of a common occurence. I mean how the ****ing hell do you take out the wrong organ?

What would you do to remedy the situation? My solution would be to privatise the whole thing, as when a hospital is more concerned about attracting patients as a method of funding rather than relying on taxpayer handouts, they won't so half-soaked as to take out your liver instead of your kidney.
Scrap the NHS? You must be mad.
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Ayshizzle
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(Original post by Otkem)
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-s...wales-16533134

And this is in a part of the UK with more socialised medicine than England. In my opinion, the word 'incompetence' is etched across the NHS. These kind of stories are becoming too much of a common occurence. I mean how the ****ing hell do you take out the wrong organ?

What would you do to remedy the situation? My solution would be to privatise the whole thing, as when a hospital is more concerned about attracting patients as a method of funding rather than relying on taxpayer handouts, they won't so half-soaked as to take out your liver instead of your kidney.
Whilst this was stupid, they do tonnes of nephrectomy's everyday that don't go wrong. Not that I'm excusing what happened here but privatisation probably wouldn't make the situation any better.
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BeanofJelly
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The NHS didn't do anything. The surgeon has not been found to be incompetent or negligent. Apparently this is a mistake which could be made by any reasonable surgeon - otherwise he certainly wouldn't continue to practise. The hospital has been upfront and now surgical guidelines have been changed.

Honestly what more do you want? And how could privatisation have prevented this from happening? Many private practice doctors also work for the NHS, it's not as though they are a separate elite group. It's not as though it isn't in NHS doctors interests to keep their patients alive. Sheesh.
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Otkem
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(Original post by modini)
So let's say a person really badly needs a kidney, but is too poor to pay for the treatment. That person will die without even an attempt at having his life saved. Would you rather that system was adopted?
At least I wouldn't be paying for other peoples' healthcare.
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ashtoreth
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the NHS is one of the cornerstones of the welfare state! be grateful that there IS such a thing.

u suggest privatising it. that makes it better how, exactly? and presume that if u think the NHS that rubbish u have private healthcare. what makes u think human error cannot happen there, just as readily?
Besakt
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(Original post by Otkem)
At least I wouldn't be paying for other peoples' healthcare.
I'm pretty sure you would change your attitude if you were in need of surgery but couldn't afford it.
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electriic_ink
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Troll is successful.
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