Explain the difference between a progressive wave and stationary wave in phase, amp? Watch

username854791
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please explain the diff between a progressive and transverse waves in terms of phase of wave and amplitude?
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MJBishop
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Which question do you want answered? The one in the subject, or the one in the message?

please explain the diff between a progressive and transverse waves in terms of phase of wave and amplitude:
There is never a comparison between transverse and progressive waves in exams, usually it's between progressive and standing waves, or between transverse and longitudinal waves..

A couple of definitions..
"A progressive wave has amplitude equal over all points, has net energy flow"
"A transverse wave has vibrations at right angles to the direction of wave motion".
There's no real way of comparing/contrasting them, since a progressive wave is a statement about how the wave flows - whether it has an energy transferral etc, whereas "a transverse wave" describes the motion of the oscillations.

Explain the difference between a progressive wave and stationary wave in phase, amp?
This question makes more sense.
"A progressive wave has amplitude equal over all points, has net energy flow"
"A standing wave is formed when two identical waves travelling in opposite directions meet and superimpose on each other. This usually happens when one wave is the reflection of the other. It has no net flow of energy"

As shown in the definitions, a progressive wave has equal amplitude over all points - there is no particular position/point in the wave where amplitude drops. On a stationary wave however, when the two waves combine/superimpose on each other, they form nodes and anti-nodes based on the wavelength/frequency of the wave.

In terms of phase, a progressive wave can be thought as a single wave, so there can be no phase difference because it does not involve two or more waves. If there were more waves, you could say that there would be phase difference between the waves, but since it's only one, it's phase is constant throughout.
On a stationary wave, phase of the reflected wave must be half the phase of the first wave. As the wave gets reflected, if its phase exactly matches, it will follow the same path as the incident wave, which would just superimpose and combine constructively to create a wave with larger amplitude. However, when the reflection is half the phase of the incident wave, it does the opposite to what the incident wave does. When the incident wave gains amplitude, the reflected wave at the same point is losing amplitude. Where the two waves meet at 0, they combine destructively and create a node (point of zero amplitude at that point), but between nodes are anti-nodes which is a point of max amplitude.
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Nerd_Alevels
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One thing i dont understand is how does a progressive wave have equal amplitude at all points,doesnt the displacement of individual particle vary
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1lyke1africa
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(Original post by Nerd_Alevels)
One thing i dont understand is how does a progressive wave have equal amplitude at all points,doesnt the displacement of individual particle vary
Also this please.
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awong0610
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Displacement- Distance of a vibrating particle from its equilibrium position at a given time

Amplitude- Maximum displacement of a vibrating particle from its equilibrium position

At a given time, yes, the displacement of a vibrating particle will vary compared to other particles. However, as the wave progresses, any particle will eventually reach its maximum displacement (or amplitude). Each particle is able to reach the same amplitude, just not at the same time.
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Virusg
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amplitude is maximum displacement
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