cdjones
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 8 years ago
#1
Hello,

Can anyone please help me resolve an issue of MSc choice?

I have received 2 conditional offers; one from LSE in MSc International Health Policy (Health Economics), the other from York MSc Health Economics.

My careers advisor advised the selection of York all along through the Autumn, but I applied to LSE and I guess was fortunate enough to secure that offer.

The York MSc department has an excellent RAE performance and is considered world leading by many it seems. The LSE MSc is less sung about (except from LSE department professors), but my question is (if put bluntly); if money is no object (partially true), would only a fool opt to decline an MSc offer from LSE?

Any assistance on this would be hugely appreciated!

Calum Jones.
0
reply
cdjones
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#2
Report Thread starter 8 years ago
#2
Additionally, perhaps someone has already undertaken/ is currently undertaking one of these MSc courses?

Any information as to the qualities of the respective courses, employment prospects and international reputation would be of extraordinary help to me.

Would be very grateful.

C Jones.
0
reply
Ghost6
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#3
Report 8 years ago
#3
I am afraid I know nothing about health economics, but I can comment on my perception of the schools. In terms of employment prospects LSE wins; I have heard stories of people being hired by financial institutions with degrees completely unrelated to finance just because it was from LSE (or Oxbridge). Also, the sole fact of being in London seems to help employment prospects. If you intend to do a PhD however, academics know which are the strong programs in their field so the general reputation of the school should be less important in that context.
1
reply
totitois
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#4
Report 6 years ago
#4
I am a graduate from the LSE course and I have friends and colleagues who graduated from York's program in health econ.

Clearly LSE is a brand and being in London matters when you need to sort out interviews during your study - either for an internship to undertake your Thesis (highly recommended) or for permanent employment after the completion of the course.

My understanding is that the course at York is quite technical. The main reason behind this is that its faculty are among the ones who have developed and advanced economic modelling HTA methods in healthcare. If you are not excited about HTA and in particular about the more technical aspects of it then I would go to the LSE and have a concentration on health policy and management. Clearly this is where the LSE wins, not only York but any other school worldwide. Pharmaceutical pricing is also another area where LSE is very strong, with its faculty advising governments, NGOs, and the industry.
1
reply
studentHE
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#5
Report 6 years ago
#5
Hello there,

I am an international student facing the same situation as the original poster. I have an offer for the MSc Health Economics from York and MSc International Health Policy (Health Economics) from LSE.


Would anyone be able to advise on the content and prospects of studying both courses. I do hope to be able to work post-masters in a role within pharmaceutical companies or consulting, on strategies for reimbursements from governments. I do hope to work in London as that's the financial capital so I assume it would be more vibrant / have more opportunities job-wise. (Is the pharmaceutical business centre of UK's pharma companies in London?)

Thank you
0
reply
Eve-T
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#6
Report 4 years ago
#6
Hi,
I don't have offers, but I have thoroughly researched both institutions as I am doing this degree as a post-graduate.
If you don't have work experience under your belt, and you're not working in Healthcare markets, then I would choose the LSE: their brand is internationally recognised, and you will have an amazing network that comes with studying at the LSE. Additionally getting a job in London with a degree by the LSE is much easier!
If, however, you are already working, or are not so fussed about working in the "big smoke" , then York offers a more "pure" teaching of health economics. Additionally, if you want to learn how to build amazing models in healthcare markets ( no matter how complex), York is for you.
0
reply
999tigger
Badges: 19
#7
Report 4 years ago
#7
Just pointing out the thread is four years old, so its likely the OP finished some time ago. Good advice though on differences between the two courses.
0
reply
Peter20a
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#8
Report 2 years ago
#8
I recommend LSE. They are the world leading institution in health policy and teach policy relevant modules in addition to very technical health economics and health econometrics modules.
0
reply
Caprice15
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#9
Report 2 years ago
#9
I realise this is an old thread, however, I have recently received offers for both York (MSc Health Economics) and LSE (MSc International Health Policy (Health Economics)) and would greatly appreciate any advice from current students on either of these courses, or other applicants Thanks!
0
reply
Jim3000
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#10
Report 1 year ago
#10
What's the view on the MSc. Course in Applied Health Economics offered by University of South Wales, is it marketable in UK/EU. Is it accredited ? is it competitive/popular ?
Last edited by Jim3000; 1 year ago
0
reply
Pricecap
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#11
Report 10 months ago
#11
Hey there!What about the comparison between Sheffield ,LSE,YORK and UCL in this field in term of job opportunities in pharma or consulting firms ?Thanks
1
reply
Hisham haq
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#12
Report 7 months ago
#12
Did you solve this riddle. I’m in the same position. How can we reconcile this?
0
reply
No-Account-thx
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#13
Report 6 months ago
#13
Currently at LSE doing the MSc Health Econ. I had offers from LSE and York. I know less about UCL and Sheffield.First, before I talk about the universities, the degree specification should play a significant role in the decision process, since it will be the degree and modules studied which will determine the skills and knowledge that is developed. However, having said that:York is great and from my understanding is known for focusing more deeply on the empirical aspects. Whilst the name 'York' is not necessarily 'world-renowned'; in the field of Health Economics, they are very highly regarded, being responsible for many published works and for progressing the empirical procedures and methodologies utilised in Health Economics. They are very likely to get you a job in healthcare economic consulting and empirical roles in pharma (Real World Evidence, HTA proposals etc). The degree may also have wider applications in economic consulting and healthcareLSE from my experience offers insight to both empirical Health Economics but also wider health policy and the pharmaceutical industry (the module called Pharmaceutical Economics is fantastic, look-up Dr. Panos Kanavos and Dr. Olivier Wouters). They have the name and the international reputation which will help with employment prospects for both sectors mentioned. What sets LSE apart, in my opinion, is they offer work placements for the dissertation in major corporations (Pfizer, Merck, Amgen, McKinsey, IQVIA, NHS England to name a few) and also hold talks where reps from similar organisations talk about the recruitment process for their respective firms. The work placements give you relevant contacts and, having spoken to previous students, many of the placements lead to full-time roles. UCL is naturally highly respected internationally and in both the pharma and consulting industries given the reputation behind the university. I don't know enough about the university to comment much more than this, but I did meet one master's student currently enrolled who recommended the course (can't remember the exact name but its equivalent MSc Health Econ course for UCL). To summarise, you won't struggle to get through the initial screening stage for either pharma or consulting job applications with a Merit or Distinction from UCL.I know the least about Sheffield, but having spoken to friends who have studied there they say it's a fantastic university and I know it has a great reputation. I know nothing about the healthcare-related course they offer, but I spoke to an employee at Janssen Pharmaceuticals UK (a subsidiary of JandJ) and he mentioned that the majority of UK university degrees they accepted for jobs were LSE, York, Sheffield, and City of London.I think on a more general note for employability, whilst the university plays a role in getting the dream job; my experience has shown me that there are many other factors that influence the outcome of a job application. The university acts as an indicator of your ability and will help to get you in the door, what follows, however, requires other skills/information/achievements. The grade you achieve is crucial, and the knowledge you have of the job role you are applying for is even more important. Being well-read and having an understanding and appreciation of the organisation and sector the job is within will differentiate yourself in interviews. By extension, contacts in the firm are seriously useful and, in some cases, can allow you to skip certain stages of recruitment. Finally, both the consulting and pharmaceutical sectors are vast and job roles vary considerably within each sector. Graduates of some degrees/unis will be more sort after in certain roles, and other uni/degrees for different roles. Perhaps narrowing down an idea of the jobs you might be interested in moving forward could help shape a decision of which university or course is best for achieving the goal of getting that job. I appreciate this is long-winded but hope it helps.
1
reply
Buttmuffin
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#14
Report 6 months ago
#14
Realise this is an old thread, but for new people who are trying to decide the same thing:

"but my question is (if put bluntly); if money is no object (partially true), would only a fool opt to decline an MSc offer from LSE?"

Yes
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Should there be a new university admissions system that ditches predicted grades?

No, I think predicted grades should still be used to make offers (685)
33.86%
Yes, I like the idea of applying to uni after I received my grades (PQA) (860)
42.51%
Yes, I like the idea of receiving offers only after I receive my grades (PQO) (387)
19.13%
I think there is a better option than the ones suggested (let us know in the thread!) (91)
4.5%

Watched Threads

View All