Impact of the First World War on Russia? Watch

fizz113
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Hey guys, I need some help here.

What were the domestic/social effects of the First World War on Russia? If possible, can you provide some stastics and sources to prove your point?

Thanks
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nerimon18
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Morale was low after the Russians were defeated greatly by the Germans. The Tsar was on the brink of collapse before he abdicated in February 1917 before the Provisional Government took over. I can't really think of stats off the top of my head but Russia faced more deaths and injuries than the Germans did. The First World War was deeoly unpopular within Russia and the Bolsheviks got their support in the October Revolution because Lenin promised to end the War.

Hope this helped.
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EloiseStar
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*Mass loss of lives as the Russians were not ready to fight (equipment wise). The generals were uncertain of how to act and were pushed by the Tsar who was a weak leader, this caused them to take massive risks which few gains. Soldiers were actually said to have been fighting boot-less and often didn't have rifles- found themselves using dead comrade's weapons.

*The peasants (remember that the troops were 80% peasants) back home didn't receive the state funding which was supposedly granted to those who had lost a family member and therefore were living on a reduced income > rioting in the countryside > peasants take land.

*Surge of workers to the main cities (Petrograd and Moscow) due to the increased demand for ammunitions meant lower unemployment and the Tsar reaped from the profits. Very few received increased wages and they were left disgruntled once more. To add to their problems, the tsar and his government still hadn't sorted out the living and working conditions which they had issues with since before 1905!!

*The railways were incomplete, in some places only being single track so that one train could travel in one direction at a time. This was the reason that guns/food/general supplies were not reaching the front line.


Quote me for a reply- I'll try and help!
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Nistar
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Hi there,

Initially, there was a lot of patriotism when Russia went to war alongside Britain and France against German and Austria-Hungary.
However, after the war the impacts really hit Russia. There were heavy military defeats, the Russian army was poorly equipped and a third of the soldiers didn't have rifles. There were awful tactics, one of these was to 'charge at the enemy and capture a gun', which obviously got a lot killed!

Around 1917, the discipline of the army broke down. Soldiers refused to obey orders and many merely deserted. Officers were just drawn from nobility (ie their 'status' and birth) rather than their military abililty. Military leaders used radio with NO CODE to co-ordinate troop movements which meant Germans could just listen in and track their movements.

Effects on the cities were major food and fuel shortages There was a priority in getting food to the army and the Trans Siberian Railway was used for this, but as you may know this was a very inefficient railway and there was starvation in towns.

Peasants were conscripted into the army which meant there weren't enough farming the land which also contributed to food shortages.

Mainly, WW1 highligted the underlying weaknesses of the Tsar's government and the war created resentment of the goverment among Russians.

It also led to the growth of the Bolsheviks, but I don't know if that's particularly relevant to you. Hope this has helped.

You can just PM me if you need any more info!
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fizz113
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(Original post by EloiseStar)
*Mass loss of lives as the Russians were not ready to fight (equipment wise). The generals were uncertain of how to act and were pushed by the Tsar who was a weak leader, this caused them to take massive risks which few gains. Soldiers were actually said to have been fighting boot-less and often didn't have rifles- found themselves using dead comrade's weapons.

*The peasants (remember that the troops were 80% peasants) back home didn't receive the state funding which was supposedly granted to those who had lost a family member and therefore were living on a reduced income > rioting in the countryside > peasants take land.

*Surge of workers to the main cities (Petrograd and Moscow) due to the increased demand for ammunitions meant lower unemployment and the Tsar reaped from the profits. Very few received increased wages and they were left disgruntled once more. To add to their problems, the tsar and his government still hadn't sorted out the living and working conditions which they had issues with since before 1905!!

*The railways were incomplete, in some places only being single track so that one train could travel in one direction at a time. This was the reason that guns/food/general supplies were not reaching the front line.


Quote me for a reply- I'll try and help!
Were there any postwar domestic issues? All of these seem to be midwar?



Thanks for the help everyone.
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fizz113
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Quick question to everyone, were they related to war or the poor leadership
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EloiseStar
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(Original post by fizz113)
Were there any postwar domestic issues? All of these seem to be midwar?



Thanks for the help everyone.
Of course the majority of these problems continued.

Many troops lost faith in their leaders and over half the Petrograd garrison, (I am so angry at myself for forgetting an actual figure) left the army and sympathised with the peasants.

It's depending on what time period you're talking about. Circa 1918 or 1917 after the Tsars abdication.... which?
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fizz113
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Also, do you have any points relating to the quality of life of the Russian people?
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EloiseStar
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(Original post by fizz113)
Also, do you have any points relating to the quality of life of the Russian people?
Peasants: lower wages, seizures of land increased dramatically (infer as you like).

Workers: bad conditions (living and working).

Circa late 1916-17 the peasants began to hoard the grains as they were not being paid enough to export to the cities (if they were willing to, the chances of it getting to where it was needed was very slim as of the rail network being so poor- 30% of food supplies ended up in Petrograd). This meant that the standard of living for the workers in the cities dropped dramatically as they couldn't even provide essentials such as bread for their families.

On a side note, the Tsar lost support from the Aristocracy due to the fiasco with the Tsarina (German Princess) and Rasputin (Dirty Monk).
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pink pineapple
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(Original post by fizz113)
Also, do you have any points relating to the quality of life of the Russian people?
pretty low, although reforms had been promised for years, nothing ever really happened. A majority of the population were peasants (around 80% peasants and 10% poor workers in factories) and there was a stark contrast between the upper and lower classes. During the winter of 1917, there were many strikes in the cties, some were not even political, some were because of reasons as simple as there was not enough food. Obviously that's a very short summary but I hope it helps. Feel free to PM me for any more info
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