D-Box
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I'm currently in year 12 and want to do Computer Science at uni, but I'm considering dropping maths. I'm looking at ABB for A2 results next year (with the A in Computing) along with a CCNA qualification. I wanted to know how many of the top universities I could apply to would be unable to make me offers due to not having maths for at least AS level.

Please consider it's ABB unis, and I'd be grateful for any advise. Thanks.
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Jedicake
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NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!

If you don't take maths, you're screwed.
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michaelhaych
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If you don't enjoy Maths then you won't enjoy a degree (and a career) that is very heavily based on Maths. Are you sure that's what you want to do?

And to answer your question; not many. Unless you apply for a foundation year.
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D-Box
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It's not that I don't enjoy it, I just can't remember lots of the equations and formulas and how to apply them for the exams - I can do the work fine with notes in front of me. Whereas I can do programming relatively easily and generally find Computing easier. Are they many universities that offer a 'Computing' course (like the one at Bournemouth)?
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olg207
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Hello I am a year 13 student and I am going to be applying for computing at Bournemouth. I was in your exact same position this time last year, and thought I had made a huge mistake by not taking maths, and thought my options were limited. I dont really enjoy maths, and found it incredibly tedious at GCSE, especially algebra -_- but after already recieving a conditional offer from bournemouth I know I want to go there.

Doing a computing course is not going to limit your chances of employment in the future, if anything it will give you a wider chance in the IT industry, because computing focuses on the majority of the IT industry, whereas computer science, is heavily focused on the science behind it (including maths). The computing course is more for people who like to get stuck in the nitty gritty, for me I like to do penetration testing and security, and in the final year of the computing course I can focus into that after building my experience in years 1 and 2. Have a look at their prospectus.

If you want to go to a russel group uni, I would recommend going to Leeds and seeing their Information Technology course, doesnt need maths at A-level either, and its an AAB, but i have been given an interview so I wonder if they will drop it to an ABB, which is what I am predicted too.

I hope I have helped, olg207
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Wahrheit
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Computer Science is unfortunately, in essence, an applied form of Maths. Depending on how you define 'top universities', I would rule out Russell Group and beyond that individually check the university websites of places you're interested in. I would consider asking yourself whether you would really enjoy a course with is so Mathematical if find Maths tedious.
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Mulder
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You don't need a maths A level to get into 'good' universities. I've had offers from Birmingham, Lancaster and Nottingham with a BTEC and no A levels (albeit with a good grade in GCSE maths).

I suppose it depends on what you mean by a 'good' uni. I doubt you'd get into Oxbridge without one, but it's not a necessity everywhere.

However if you don't like maths or aren't good at it then I think computer science is probably not a good choice!
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D-Box
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Thanks for the help everybody. I still have the rest of the year before I need to start seriously thinking about the options. Computer Science has loads of different sections inside the content of the courses, so I'll try and look for a good opportunity; avoiding the maths intensive ones (animation, robotics, etc.). I really appreciate hearing from people who were in a similar position or are doing a CS related course at the moment.
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Jam'
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Employers of computer scientists want candidates with both strong computing (programming etc.) skills as well as mathematical skills.

Computer science is essentially application of mathematics to technology. Without maths, you'll suffer.

It's also a requirement (to A2) by the 'top' universities.
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spyka
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(Original post by D-Box)
Thanks for the help everybody. I still have the rest of the year before I need to start seriously thinking about the options. Computer Science has loads of different sections inside the content of the courses, so I'll try and look for a good opportunity; avoiding the maths intensive ones (animation, robotics, etc.). I really appreciate hearing from people who were in a similar position or are doing a CS related course at the moment.
Maths pops up in CS is almost every aspect (or at least in my degree), not just the obvious choices.

One of my modules was called E-Business techniques, looking at online businesses, revenue models, etc. You'd think it'd be pretty much all theory (and not really CS), and yet there was quite a bit of strong maths involved - a lot of statistics, infact - looking at similarity metrics and whatnot (Pearson's correlation coefficient, etc). with regards to algorithms

You'll also find that a lot of Unis will first teach you the theory behind programming before programming itself (or do it in parallel, at least). This also involves a lot of maths, although more discrete this time. Things like time complexity and whatnot.

There's also a lot of proof, for example another module I do is Critical Systems, which deals a lot in proving that a program will work and won't fail.

Another key CS/Maths area is Automata theory, which the Wikipedia page will give a very nice introduction to if you want to see the type of "maths" you'll be doing. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Automata_theory

NB. 3rd year CS at Soton
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gingergirl1993
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Hey everyone, I was in this position, I did IT, Psychology and French and applied to Kings College, UCL and City for various types of Computer science, all of them saying that maths was a requirement, when actually I called them up and they counted IT as computing, which meant I did not need maths. So actually, the top universities DO take students without maths. xxx
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tooosh
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(Original post by gingergirl1993)
Hey everyone, I was in this position, I did IT, Psychology and French and applied to Kings College, UCL and City for various types of Computer science, all of them saying that maths was a requirement, when actually I called them up and they counted IT as computing, which meant I did not need maths. So actually, the top universities DO take students without maths. xxx
Sorry but you did not get into UCL for CS without Maths. Whatever you applied for at UCL was not CS.
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Jam'
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(Original post by tooosh)
Sorry but you did not get into UCL for CS without Maths. Whatever you applied for at UCL was not CS.
She won't get an offer ^_^
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Harry-Potter
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I did maths, bio and psych for a-level.
Studying CS at uni atm.

In our course, logic is the only thing you need, not maths. However, maths requires logic, so people who are gd at maths tend to be gd at CS.
But you can be gd as long as you have a logical mind.
Psychology has been useful for requirements engineeing, ui and ux design,usability inspection etc.
bio was a waste of time, although it gave me a lot of knowledge outside my field of study/
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ScruffyQuaver
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Screw half of these people. I didn't do maths. I am going to one of the best compsci unis in the UK (birmingham) this year. Its true computer science has maths elements but you learn these at degree level!
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khal_
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Universities definitely expect you to have a good grounding in Maths. I really struggled with the maths courses at school, I just didn't enjoy trigonometry. I managed to fudge it a bit, got admitted to Information Systems at Heriot-Watt originally and then worked hard in my first semester to pester them into letting me switch. First semesters were the same so this was relatively easy to do at the time, but I might just have been lucky, this might be different for different departments. In terms of actual maths content anything relevant was covered again, the most important mathematical concepts really were logic and discrete maths which we had courses on. Don't get me wrong maths skills will definitely help you, and I definitely regret not taking it more seriously, but at least at my university they wouldn't necessarily throw you straight at the deep end.

Of the universities I applied to pretty much all asked for Maths I think Strathclyde might possibly have not but I don't remember now. But if you're aiming for a top university they'll definitely be more stringent.
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BlueWolf16
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I was wondering, is it a big deal if you have a B in maths, but the unis want an A? I'm talking about the ones in around top 20, maybe higher.. I'm from Ireland so we have to do 7 subjects in total for our exams - juggling between Maths, French, then Biology, in a period of 3 days is quite tough, but I wouldn't say I'm bad at maths, and I certainly don't hate it.
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KarMa611
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A-Level Maths is an entry requirement for a lot of unis for CS but there are an odd few good unis that accept you without it.

Ultimately, the most important thing is deciding if CS appeals to you more than any other degree. If you'd rather do CS than anything else, then the choice suddenly becomes really obvious.

Go do CS. Don't get scared out of doing a degree because 'Maths is too hard'. Work hard and get your hands dirty. I will guarantee that if you are prepared to actually put the work in and seek out support when you need it then you will end up doing a lot better than some A-Level Maths prodigy who is lazy when he gets to uni.
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Joe Pearson
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(Original post by KarMa611)
A-Level Maths is an entry requirement for a lot of unis for CS but there are an odd few good unis that accept you without it.

Ultimately, the most important thing is deciding if CS appeals to you more than any other degree. If you'd rather do CS than anything else, then the choice suddenly becomes really obvious.

Go do CS. Don't get scared out of doing a degree because 'Maths is too hard'. Work hard and get your hands dirty. I will guarantee that if you are prepared to actually put the work in and seek out support when you need it then you will end up doing a lot better than some A-Level Maths prodigy who is lazy when he gets to uni.
I know this question is a bit old now... but is CompSci maths hard for someone who didn't take A-Level maths or is it 'easy' if you put the work in?
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username738914
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(Original post by Joe Pearson)
I know this question is a bit old now... but is CompSci maths hard for someone who didn't take A-Level maths or is it 'easy' if you put the work in?
Latter, maths is like any other skill. Put the effort in to improve it and it'll pay off.

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