Fuzzpig
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Hopefully there will be a few people here who have managed to get onto a doctorate in Clinical Psychology. I wondered what your route/story was?

The same goes for anyone currently planning their route into clinical psychology.

My own route might be a bit different but I'm told it will work, - BSc Psychology at Kent (final year), work experience in a prison during the summer (Psychology department, completed), MSc Forensic Psychology, two years out as an assistant psychologist (in a centre that specialises in both clinical and forensic, I have access to this so fingers crossed a position becomes available), then start applying for the Doctorate.


I hope to apply to Exeter University as my boyfriend will be (hopefully) employed at the hospital there as a Biomedical Scientist by this point. But I realise that I'll probably just have to go wherever will take me!

By the time I qualify, if all goes to plan, I'll be 27!

Looking forward to any replies
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Lord Asriel
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My route into clinical psychology was

3 years (BSc) Psychology.
1 Year Research Assistant Psychologist.
3.5 Years PhD Experimental Psychology
3 Years as a Trainee Clinical Psychologist
3 Years working as a Qualified Clinical Psychologist

Please note that this is not the only route, but it was the one I took. I wasn't an assistant psychologist or anything like that. Happy to answer any questions you have about it and best of luck.

For the record, Exeter is a really well run course with some really good supervisors and course staff. Good choice.
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Fuzzpig
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(Original post by Lord Asriel)
My route into clinical psychology was

3 years (BSc) Psychology.
1 Year Research Assistant Psychologist.
3.5 Years PhD Experimental Psychology
3 Years as a Trainee Clinical Psychologist
3 Years working as a Qualified Clinical Psychologist

Please note that this is not the only route, but it was the one I took. I wasn't an assistant psychologist or anything like that. Happy to answer any questions you have about it and best of luck.

For the record, Exeter is a really well run course with some really good supervisors and course staff. Good choice.
Wow, that's a lot of post-grad. :eek:

I've looked into it a bit and asked a few people, it seems standard now that you have to have at least one year of experience working with a clinical population. I think I'll start applying halfway through the 2 years I've allocated for the assistant positions.

Did you go to Exeter for the doctorate? What was the course actually like? Day to day? Stress/workload and so on? And are you actually enjoying this as a career choice?

I'm from Devon so Exeter would be perfect for me. And as I've said, hopefully my boyfriend will be at the RD&H hospital once he's qualified, he's got a trainee position there as a biomed at the moment. Fingers crossed on all counts!
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Student44
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I've been lucky enough to talk to a couple of Clinical Psychologists in the NHS, to gain an idea about their roles etc for my personal statement. Anyway I spoke to one trainee clinical psychologist who had just completed:

4 years BSc Psychology (Scottish Uni)
3 Years PhD (Scottish Uni)

Then secured her place on the doctorate.

Hope this helps
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cberry
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I'm doing a PhD and probably thinking not clinical for me, but I have lots of friends training in different places at the minute (although not exeter) and from what I can remember for the ones I know about:

1 did some forensic experience as a support worker, then did the IAPT training, then did 6 months as a research assistant
1 did forensic experience with young people as a support worker, then worked for an assertive outreach community team as a support worker, then one year as a research assistant
1 was a support worker with a community team, did a forensic masters, then 6 months as a therapy/research assistant on a computerised therapy trial
1 came from working as a CBT therapist in an IAPT service
My own supervisor did a neuroscience PhD then the clinical doctorate
My old manager worked as a mental health nurse and then did the doctorate

I think most of them might have done a little extra voluntary work as well but not sure.
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Tay594
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(Original post by Lord Asriel)
My route into clinical psychology was

3 years (BSc) Psychology.
1 Year Research Assistant Psychologist.
3.5 Years PhD Experimental Psychology
3 Years as a Trainee Clinical Psychologist
3 Years working as a Qualified Clinical Psychologist

Please note that this is not the only route, but it was the one I took. I wasn't an assistant psychologist or anything like that. Happy to answer any questions you have about it and best of luck.

For the record, Exeter is a really well run course with some really good supervisors and course staff. Good choice.
Do you think that it is different now from when you applied for the doctorate in terms of experience needed? Also, how old were you when you qualified? And what was your timetable like when you were doing the doctorate?

I hope that you are enjoying the career
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*Elizabeth*
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(Original post by aliluvschoc)
Hopefully there will be a few people here who have managed to get onto a doctorate in Clinical Psychology. I wondered what your route/story was?

The same goes for anyone currently planning their route into clinical psychology.

My own route might be a bit different but I'm told it will work, - BSc Psychology at Kent (final year), work experience in a prison during the summer (Psychology department, completed), MSc Forensic Psychology, two years out as an assistant psychologist (in a centre that specialises in both clinical and forensic, I have access to this so fingers crossed a position becomes available), then start applying for the Doctorate.


I hope to apply to Exeter University as my boyfriend will be (hopefully) employed at the hospital there as a Biomedical Scientist by this point. But I realise that I'll probably just have to go wherever will take me!

By the time I qualify, if all goes to plan, I'll be 27!

Looking forward to any replies
Friends of mine got onto clinical training after completing an MSc in Health Psychology or an MSc in Research Methods in Psychology followed by 2-5 years of relevant experience (Assistant Psychologist, Research Psychologist, Research Assistant). Others got on after completing a PhD in a clinically relevant area. All of my friends were in the late 20s (27-29) and early thirties (30-31) when they started clinical training. Average age for starting clinical training seems to be around 27/28, although some people start in their early 20s, although this seems to be rather rare these days!

Have a look at this link which shows applicants backgrounds which led to a place on the doctorate in clinical psychology.

http://www.clinpsy.org.uk/forum/view...php?f=32&t=145
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Lord Asriel
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Do you think that it is different now from when you applied for the doctorate in terms of experience needed? Also, how old were you when you qualified? And what was your timetable like when you were doing the doctorate?

I hope that you are enjoying the career
I really enjoy my work thanks, and really appreciate the options this career path has given me.

I was 30 when I qualified (27 when I got on clinical training), but I made the choice to do clinical psych quite late on, so it never felt that I was marking time during my 20s at any stage. My timetable was very busy. It was a 37.5 hour a week job, with two full days of lectures a week (16 hours across 2 days) and 3 days on placement (9am-5pm). I got a day a fortnight to do my research, and the odd teaching block (5 days teaching) or research week when placement ended. It was very busy, and I would have to do research projects and essays on some of the weekends and evenings.

There has always been high calibre candidates that get on training, but I think what is different now is that there is less room to bounce back from early mistakes in your career. If you have a dodgy reference, or have a lack in any particular area, it seems far less forgiving than it used to be. However, there is far more information around online than when I was at school or undergrad, so you are in the luckier position of being forwarned and able to avoid some of the pitfalls.
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~ Purple Rose ~
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I am considering counselling/clinical psychology.

So far:

BA Religious Studies with Psychology
Level 3 Certificate in Counselling Skills
Currently MSc Counselling

Also completed 120 credits towards the OU's BSc Psychology.

I have two year's experience as a support worker, have also worked in a hostel/day centre/college all involving people with mental health issues.

I have have done some not-particularly-relevant voluntary work, but am in the process of arranging some with Mind and with a dementia organisation.

I will be starting a counselling placement in residential mental health soon.

I'm 28 and after I finish my masters have another two years of the OU to go, so I will be an oldie by the time I get round to applying
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Fuzzpig
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Thanks for all of the replies! It's interesting to see that people have chosen such different paths.

I only hope that I can gain enough experience. I wanted to work with young adults as part of my self-allocated 2-years experience (my dad's company), but it seems I might be too young. You're meant to be at least four years older than the oldest client (19 in this case), yet I'll only be 22 when I graduate from my MSc, a bit worrying! I was really relying on this place to form my first 'real' block of experience.
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becca_bee
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Do you have to have a PhD to become a clinical psychologist? I'm sure i've read other places that it isn't essential?
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*Elizabeth*
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(Original post by becca_bee)
Do you have to have a PhD to become a clinical psychologist? I'm sure i've read other places that it isn't essential?
Nope definitely not essential, but I think a completed PhD helps when applying for more academic/research focused unis.

Have a look at this website and this link which shows the range of experiences and qualifications people have before getting onto the clinical psychology doctorate.
http://www.clinpsy.org.uk/forum/view...php?f=32&t=145
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becca_bee
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(Original post by *Elizabeth*)
Nope definitely not essential, but I think a completed PhD definitely helps when applying for more academic/research focused unis.

Have a look at this website and this link which shows the range of experiences and qualifications people have before getting onto the clinical psychology doctorate.
http://www.clinpsy.org.uk/forum/view...php?f=32&t=145
Thank you very much
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Drizzy12
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(Original post by Lord Asriel)
My route into clinical psychology was

3 years (BSc) Psychology.
1 Year Research Assistant Psychologist.
3.5 Years PhD Experimental Psychology
3 Years as a Trainee Clinical Psychologist
3 Years working as a Qualified Clinical Psychologist

Please note that this is not the only route, but it was the one I took. I wasn't an assistant psychologist or anything like that. Happy to answer any questions you have about it and best of luck.

For the record, Exeter is a really well run course with some really good supervisors and course staff. Good choice.
hey i'm planning my route into clinical psychology..

3 years (BSc) Psychology.
1 Year Research Assistant Psychologist/ assistant psychologist
including voluntry work experience and paid job during degree and before degree.

- shadowing clinical psychologist, working in a care home, health care assistant etc...
3 Years as a Trainee Clinical Psychologist

i just wanted to ask is it necessary to take masters or a phd course before you start clinical psychology training?
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~ Purple Rose ~
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(Original post by Drizzy12)
hey i'm planning my route into clinical psychology..

3 years (BSc) Psychology.
1 Year Research Assistant Psychologist/ assistant psychologist
including voluntry work experience and paid job during degree and before degree.

- shadowing clinical psychologist, working in a care home, health care assistant etc...
3 Years as a Trainee Clinical Psychologist

i just wanted to ask is it necessary to take masters or a phd course before you start clinical psychology training?
Getting a clinical psychologist to let you shadow them isn't very likely because of confidentiality, you are better off trying to get a job as a HCA on a psychiatric ward, or a job where you work directly with psychologists.

A masters or a PhD isn't necessary (although a masters is if you get a 2:2, although most courses won't even accept that).
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*Elizabeth*
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I managed to get 2 voluntary assistant psychologist shadowing clinical psychologists jobs shortly after undergraduate graduation. It is possible! I juggled these voluntary positions with relevant paid posts. This was back in 2003-2005, so things may have changed since then.

I'm currently a bank support worker in a care home to build up my clinical skills loving it so far

Yep, don't need postgraduate qualifications to get onto clinical [although I think it helps, especially as I know some clinical courses award applicants with 'points' for postgrad qualifications (AND work experience) and the applicants with highest points are selected for interview!] Consider that some clinical courses select applicants for interview via performance in a research methods exam after passing through the initial admission tutors. In this instance, postgrad qualifications don't count and if applicants don't make the top % of scoring applicants then it means no interview!
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Ellie247
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Hey guys.. I just spent the last summer working in Sri Lanka and got some great experience working in clinical psych. I basically worked in a psychiatric hospital and with children with disabilities. We also went to a conference which was a really good insight into clinical psychology.. it was with SL Volunteers btw
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cassia112
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Hi Ellie247
I am thinking of doing this as well would you be able to tell me some more about it, are you now on the Clinical psychologist course
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MoonShadowWolf
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Super handy seeing all the options available. I'm graduating this year but dont know how best to get the assistant psych posts. Where are the voluntary ones advertised? And what relevant graduate jobs are available in the nhs other than working as hca?

Posted from TSR Mobile
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Aivicore
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Not me, but my eldest sister's contribution:

- 3 years BA Psychology at Bangor university.
- 1 year as a research assistant.
- 5 year doctorate at Sheffield university.
- 1 year as trainee clinical psychologist.

(Off-topic, but OP, my eyes are glued to your avatar...)
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