Russia's Famous Turning Points Watch

Hazzabanana
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Just finished my coursework on the question the key turning points in Russia between 1855 - 1956. Really interesting question in my view. My argument followed the argument it was Stalin's Great Turn and the 1917 Revolutions which were the key ones, followed by the two World Wars, Alexander II's reforms and K.'s De-stalinisation policies (in descending order as importance as a turning point.

As many History students come to realise, your argument is based around what you read, are taught and the textbooks you are used (something I find fascinating if I'm honest to my inner-history geek). So I'm wondering, whether anyone has any majorly opposite views or arguments? And if you do, where did it come from or what textbooks you use?
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razorfin
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If you are doing until the end of 1956 you could include de-Stalinization, that was a major point, but when it started is debatable, Khrushchev came to power in 1953 and made his big anti Stalin speech in '56. Huge though, without doubt.
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SRaza94
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hi, i no i'm late but ...
i believe that it was ww1, if we look at before ww1 russia was growing at 6% and as we have seen in the arab spring the economic situation plays a major part in protest against regimes.. because of the strains of total war on russia people protested, arguably this wouldn't have happened without the war. the tsar's incompetence was also aggravated because of the war and the military that sided with him which kept him in power in 1905 opposed him because of the war and the PG failed because of the war.
I think none these would've happened without the war so for me ww1 was the major turning point.
and if you think about it the other turning points you mentioned wouldn't have happened if it had not been because of the war!
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JOR2010
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(Original post by Hazzabanana)
Just finished my coursework on the question the key turning points in Russia between 1855 - 1956. Really interesting question in my view. My argument followed the argument it was Stalin's Great Turn and the 1917 Revolutions which were the key ones, followed by the two World Wars, Alexander II's reforms and K.'s De-stalinisation policies (in descending order as importance as a turning point.

As many History students come to realise, your argument is based around what you read, are taught and the textbooks you are used (something I find fascinating if I'm honest to my inner-history geek). So I'm wondering, whether anyone has any majorly opposite views or arguments? And if you do, where did it come from or what textbooks you use?
I'd have to say the early 20th century, or around 1905, when the Tsar's grip on affairs seemed to slip a little. Mass protests, a failing war, an economy which could have been growing much faster, poor domestic conditions made for much public unhappiness. Then I'd say obviously the Communist ascension in 1917, and perhaps the winter of 1941, Russia's saving grace.
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K_12
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Hello everyone,

I am having some trouble structuring this essay and coming to a judgement:
How did the tsars improve the economy?

Any help?

Thank you
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SRaza94
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(Original post by K_12)
Hello everyone,

I am having some trouble structuring this essay and coming to a judgement:
Within the context of the period 1855-1964, to what extent did the economy significantly improve under Stalin 1928-1941?

Any help?

Thank you
im on the verge of writing that in my essay, you could mention the vast increase in industrial output, not sure on the actual figures but there was a five fold increase in coal output in a 5 year period. So during stalins rule russia went from an agricultural sate to and industrial sate which helped it survive the war which shows the improvement in the economy
But you argue that this was at the expense of the agricultural sector which was heavily neglected by stalin.
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K_12
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(Original post by SRaza94)
im on the verge of writing that in my essay, you could mention the vast increase in industrial output, not sure on the actual figures but there was a five fold increase in coal output in a 5 year period. So during stalins rule russia went from an agricultural sate to and industrial sate which helped it survive the war which shows the improvement in the economy
But you argue that this was at the expense of the agricultural sector which was heavily neglected by stalin.
thank you i was in the middle of writing a comparison about the crimean war and WW2 and how stalin wanted "revenge for past humiliation" i guess i can link that to your points thank you once again
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SRaza94
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hey guys,
i wondered if you could help me in understanding the significance of de-stalinisation of Russia as a turning point?!
quite confused on this bit, i understand what happened but not how it can be viewed as a turning point politically, economically or socially
thanks
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Nicholas Brakespear
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1911 - Prime Minister Stolypin's marginalisation and assassination.

Very important. The last man that could have saved the monarchy beyond 1917. He was trying to allow for some flexibility in terms of wealth creation and land ownership within the social order to maintain the survival of the order itself. A revolution from above (some similarities to Bismarck?), but what Russia got was revolution from below.

The aristocracy and the Tsar himself were too conservative to reach for the opportunity.

Other than that, well, 1942 - for the final defeat of German ambitions in the East, and the start of a long retreat.
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guardian
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There are many famous turning points from that era which helped to change the way in which Russia worked. Here's a few examples:

Emancipaton of the Serfs [1864] - Highlighted Tsar Alex II's liberating perspective and gave peasants a slightly easier life with less opression

Revolution/Bloody Sunday [1905] - Pivotal in bringing some sort of democracy to the political system

February/October Revolution [1917] - 1917 was a huge turning point in Russian history as it symbolised the iconic change from autocracy to dictatorship

Stalin's Five Year Plans [1928 ownwards] - Collectivisation and stalin's five year plans showed his opressive style and genocide-like image and turned russia into a deadly communist state
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Theguy234
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Hello I was wondering if anyone could help me on a turning point of Russia, I'm doing Peter the great.
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daisypatten
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(Original post by guardian)
There are many famous turning points from that era which helped to change the way in which Russia worked. Here's a few examples:

Emancipaton of the Serfs [1864] - Highlighted Tsar Alex II's liberating perspective and gave peasants a slightly easier life with less opression

Revolution/Bloody Sunday [1905] - Pivotal in bringing some sort of democracy to the political system

February/October Revolution [1917] - 1917 was a huge turning point in Russian history as it symbolised the iconic change from autocracy to dictatorship

Stalin's Five Year Plans [1928 ownwards] - Collectivisation and stalin's five year plans showed his opressive style and genocide-like image and turned russia into a deadly communist state
You could argue that there was a continuity in the nature of government and that the Bolshevik dictatorship had its similarities to tsarist autocracy. Although they exercised their authority in different ways, you could counter it by saying that Bolshevik repression of democratic institutions, of the population etc. bears resemblance to the Tsars, particularly Aiii/Nii, and arguably that any reforms made weren't implemented with the intention of ever relinquishing any authority.

I'd probably argue that Stalin's policies were the most decisive turning point, e.g collectivisation meaning the Russian economy was no longer based on individual peasant farmers, intensified repression of opposition meaning Stalin is classed as one of the biggest mass murderers in history, etc. I haven't yet studied Khrushchev and only have basic knowledge about destalinisation from GCSE lol.
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Driftingdreamer
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I did the question 'To what extent did Russia swap one authoritarian regime for another in 1917' or something to that effect. Also, we could only discuss up to the end of Lenin's rule.

Essentially, I argued that Lenin's regime was far more authoritarian than the tsars of old. And went on to say that it was essentially a despotism.

If you're interested in Russian political theory I would very much encourage you to read Richard Pipes' 'Russian Conservatism and Its Critics: A Study in Political Culture'

It goes all the way back to the days of the Mongol-Tatar Khanate Horde and explains essentially why in Russia, Conservatism always triumphs. Even the 1917 revolution was deeply conservative (in the Russian sense of the word) behind the thin veil of the Communist ideology.

Getting on to the point, I'm not sure I'd actually have 1917 as a major turning point. Instead I would probably examine how with the rise of nihilism in the late 19th century and other such events, it became increasingly fated. But there's the good chance my answer would end up being very wishy-washy indeed. I'm sure yours was great.
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helpcoursework
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Hi, what historians/textbooks did you use to form your argument? Im thinking of doing a very similar question
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