Anyone ever applied to/studied at the Paris-Sorbonne University?

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Stéphane
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(Original post by Romanorum-Hellas)
I believe it is Strasbourg

Ah, did France change you?
France made me actually, seeing as I've always lived here

I'm going too far of course (hence the smiley) but if you make the most of your time in Paris and Strasbourg, your head will soon be filled with images that will last for a lifetime.
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Romanorum-Hellas
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(Original post by Stéphane)
France made me actually, seeing as I've always lived here

I'm going too far of course (hence the smiley) but if you make the most of your time in Paris and Strasbourg, your head will soon be filled with images that will last for a lifetime.
There is a deeply rooted sense of respect and admiration for French people and culture within the English consciousness. I certainly feel very excited about going to Paris More so than going to Shanghai and Beijing this summer! I'm just hoping that the French are generally not drunken fools like English folk haha
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Stéphane
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(Original post by Romanorum-Hellas)
There is a deeply rooted sense of respect and admiration for French people and culture within the English consciousness. I certainly feel very excited about going to Paris More so than going to Shanghai and Beijing this summer! I'm just hoping that the French are generally not drunken fools like English folk haha
Oh really ? Respect and admiration ? French people (or those who are my age) are fascinated by one thing : SKINS. They picture the typical young English as the one who drinks day and night and goes through dirty sh*t all the time. :rolleyes:

Don't worry though, binge drinking isn't part of our "Frenchness" if there's one.
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xmarilynx
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(Original post by Stéphane)
Oh really ? Respect and admiration ? French people (or those who are my age) are fascinated by one thing : SKINS. They picture the English youth as being all about trash and stuff. :rolleyes:

Don't worry though, binge drinking isn't part of our "Frenchness" if there's one.
Lol that's so true, I've lost count of the amount of times I've been asked about our legendary house parties :cool:

Shame real life is more like the inbetweeners though :p:
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Romanorum-Hellas
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(Original post by Stéphane)
Oh really ? Respect and admiration ? French people (or those who are my age) are fascinated by one thing : SKINS. They picture the typical young English as the one who drinks day and night and goes through dirty sh*t all the time. :rolleyes:

Don't worry though, binge drinking isn't part of our "Frenchness" if there's one.
Do French people really view us thus? I assure you that I am not a binge drinker haha I am quite socially conservative in my ways - like a traditional Englishman.

French was the international tongue until the 1950s and French art/culture has influenced England heavily. Indeed, it is still assumed by some traditional English people that learning French is crucial to becoming 'educated' haha. The upper classes have always spoken it.

I suppose the youth of England are able to exercise considerable freedom in their social lives. Although this is good, I personally believe that it makes us blind as to the consequences. Many English people my age don't know the true value of money or a hard day's work.
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facdroit
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(Original post by Romanorum-Hellas)
I've always wanted to study there because of its rich history, academic reputation and situation in the centre of Paris. I know that it is primarily an arts/humanities university and my current degree I am studying is History. If I got a 1st and managed to perfect my French, would applying there be as competitive as somewhere like, for example, Cambridge or UCL? I hear it is the best university in France and among the best in the world.


(Original post by Scout-)
I was accepted there for History when I was considering doing my Bachelors degree abroad. It did not really seem difficult to get into. I had a very ordinary score of 73% in Grade 12 and I am pretty sure that my personal statement was not exceptional since I did not put much effort into the application. I recall that I did not have to submit any references either. Perhaps the fact that I was fluent in French helped me get in. I even visited it before I decided to turn the offer down, and although the Sorbonne campus is good, the undergraduate one at Tolbiac is quite average. I knew someone who studied Economics there and she wasn't too happy either. I think it may be very good for Masters though but I can't say that it can come as close to Oxbridge or UCL as far as competitiveness for admissions is concerned.


(Original post by Romanorum-Hellas)
I suppose la Sorbonne has lost a considerable amount of prestige since its glory days in the Middle and Early Modern eras. How would I go about applying for an MA History? I would also like to apply to Cambridge as well.


(Original post by Stéphane)
Don't ever go to study in France, seriously. Even La Sorbonne won't lead you anywhere... As mentioned on the above, it's very easy to get in (a French person only needs to get his or her baccalauréat with minimum marks, and they're good to go) and you will end up with some random people that aren't passionate about anything.

Plus, the undergraduate studies take place in Tolbiac : ugly building, sad people, teachers that don't care about you understanding or not, constant blockades, the administration driving you nuts... a few of my friends do study there, but as most of the people I hanged out with in high school had at least a bit of ambition, most of them decided not to ruin their own lives - and for those who went there, wel... It's all about regrets and complaining. It's not specific to La Sorbonne though ; French universities are **** as they can't select their students and they have no money to invest in decent facilities.

I know how living in France can sound appealing, especially Paris which is indeed a great city to live in, but you would regret it, I swear. Stay in whatever country you live in right now, it must have a better higher education system. It kind of hurts to say this but... French universities are why I've decided to go in the UK, after two years of prépa (intensive and selective programme, still to avoid going to French uni) and people who want to do something with their lives are all flying away from here. Would be a huge mistake to go there.
SOme clarifications, french universities aren't ''easy'' to get into there just is a whole different concept. There is no application for first year undergrad just inscription which like Stephane said means whoever has a high school diploma and wants to join can join. Furthermore french universities are very cheap, most students who have no idea what they want to do with their lives sign up to some random l1(licence 1 which is 1st year of undergrad) until they can figure something else, the dropout/fail rate between 1st and 2nd year is amazingly huge. A class that can start with 1000 students will see 40 graduating for courses like law and medicine.
Every professional in france has a masters degree. In france unless you want to study political science/engineering or business you go to a university and then you specialise in the masters degree, here you will find similar levels of competitivness with the likes of Oxford and Cambridge. The ecole de magistrature in bordeaux accepts 80 students a year from a pool of about 10,000 for example.
French university are very highly regarded both in France and outside of france. One more thing to note french universities are not ''ranked'' all the teaching is the same across the board and people pick universities based on geographical location most of the time.
Graduates from french universities work and research in top institutions throughout the world.
The system is not ''weak'' it's just different.
Studying in a french uni requires a lot more independence, there are very little homeworks and not much contact hours with professors.
It's not for everyone but do your research first it's the country that hosts the 6th largest international student population.
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annasolange
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I have some questions concerning the undergrad courses at Paris 1 and Paris IV, more specifically the history of art.
3 weeks ago I went to Paris to apply sur place to both unis. Basically I fell in love with Paris a long time ago and had my heart set on studying there ever since. When I was in Paris I met a girl who rejected her offer from Oxford in favor of Paris 1 which was quite ridiculous in my opinion but right now I'm facing a similar decision since I got an offer from St Andrews for history of art. I spoke to some people who completed their studies in HoA in paris and they seemed satisfied with their time at the university.
What is appealing to me is the students' independence. On the other hand I was rather horrified by the orientation of the staff who wasn't even able to tell me where the office for international students was (the same building..) and some people who ran into me asking where some other room was (I assume those were some students).
Anyways, I'm thinking about taking either of two paths for my future education: 1. complete my licence at either of the unis in Paris and then try to go for a year to one of the US universities (from what I've learnt the Paris 1 uni has some study abroad program with Columbia) and if possible transfer to study there permanently for the master. the second option would be to go to St Andrews towards which I'm quite uncertain as the town itself is far less impressive than Paris.
Also if any of you could tell me where the career perspectives after history of art studies are better I would really appreciate any advice. I'm Polish so I have no insider view on any of the universities.
Another thing is which of the Paris universities is better, Paris 1 or IV?
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katiiiie
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#28
(Original post by annasolange)
I have some questions concerning the undergrad courses at Paris 1 and Paris IV, more specifically the history of art.
3 weeks ago I went to Paris to apply sur place to both unis. Basically I fell in love with Paris a long time ago and had my heart set on studying there ever since. When I was in Paris I met a girl who rejected her offer from Oxford in favor of Paris 1 which was quite ridiculous in my opinion but right now I'm facing a similar decision since I got an offer from St Andrews for history of art. I spoke to some people who completed their studies in HoA in paris and they seemed satisfied with their time at the university.
What is appealing to me is the students' independence. On the other hand I was rather horrified by the orientation of the staff who wasn't even able to tell me where the office for international students was (the same building..) and some people who ran into me asking where some other room was (I assume those were some students).
Anyways, I'm thinking about taking either of two paths for my future education: 1. complete my licence at either of the unis in Paris and then try to go for a year to one of the US universities (from what I've learnt the Paris 1 uni has some study abroad program with Columbia) and if possible transfer to study there permanently for the master. the second option would be to go to St Andrews towards which I'm quite uncertain as the town itself is far less impressive than Paris.
Also if any of you could tell me where the career perspectives after history of art studies are better I would really appreciate any advice. I'm Polish so I have no insider view on any of the universities.
Another thing is which of the Paris universities is better, Paris 1 or IV?
I've experienced both - I'm doing a degree in Modern Languages at St Andrews but am currently spending my year abroad at Paris IV Sorbonne.
Right. Yes I totally agree - in terms of the town, St Andrews doesn't even begin to compare to Paris - nowhere does. It's a fantastic city that I will never tire of. However, this year has been somewhat spoilt by the horrendous experience I've had at the Sorbonne - teachers are totally unhelpful, uncaring, and the resources are crap. If you want a thorough education where the grades are fair and where guidance is always available, go for St Andrews!
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misschatoyant
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(Original post by Scout-)
I was accepted there for History when I was considering doing my Bachelors degree abroad. It did not really seem difficult to get into. I had a very ordinary score of 73% in Grade 12 and I am pretty sure that my personal statement was not exceptional since I did not put much effort into the application. I recall that I did not have to submit any references either. Perhaps the fact that I was fluent in French helped me get in. I even visited it before I decided to turn the offer down, and although the Sorbonne campus is good, the undergraduate one at Tolbiac is quite average. I knew someone who studied Economics there and she wasn't too happy either. I think it may be very good for Masters though but I can't say that it can come as close to Oxbridge or UCL as far as competitiveness for admissions is concerned.
may I ask how you applied? The website doesn't exactly make it clear when deadlines are, and what documents they want to look at..:/
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kat.lev
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(Original post by misschatoyant)
may I ask how you applied? The website doesn't exactly make it clear when deadlines are, and what documents they want to look at..:/
Hi - I took this from the website. I applied way back in 2010/11 so it's a bit hazy but I think I just wrote to them and they sent me the list of documents to send.

The deadline is usually quite late - mid Summer I think, but the earlier the better of course!

Hope this helps



Pour une 1ère inscription :
Les étudiants arrivant à l’Université Paris-Sorbonne en dehors du cadre d’un programme d’échanges (Erasmus, Convention...) doivent accomplir les démarches auprès du Bureau des étudiants étrangers.
Galerie Richelieu,
Bureau C355bis (en bas à droite de l’escalier F)
01.40.46.34.08 Fax 01.40.46.26.08
[email protected]

Horaires et accueil :
Le Lundi de 9h-12h et 14h-17h
Les Mardi, Jeudi, Vendredi de 9h-12h
Fermé le Mercredi
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VariMcNeil
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Hi Katie,
I'm in 2nd year at Strathclyde and considering doing my Erasmus at the Sorbonne, any tips/advice?
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kat.lev
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(Original post by VariMcNeil)
Hi Katie,
I'm in 2nd year at Strathclyde and considering doing my Erasmus at the Sorbonne, any tips/advice?
Hi!

Not sure I'm the best person to ask, I study Hispanic Culture and Lit so all the Erasmus students coming to my dept were from Spain. I also think UK students aren't required to pass their modules, right? That would certainly make things easier as the courses are pretty hard.

You definitely get a bit of help, ie for a linguistics course that was taught in French, the Erasmus students were allowed to write their final exam in Spanish instead.

In terms of accommodation, I know there is something available for foreign studetns but that there isn't enough for everyone. See crous.fr for more information on that.. Otherwise I'd recommend you get here a month or so before terms starts as finding acc in Paris is a full-time job!

In terms of the city - I think Paris is better to visit than live in. It's also very expensive, much more so than London or any city in the UK.

This all sounds very off-putting! Haha! I don't mean it that way.. I just think people have a romantic idea of Paris and so I prefer to prepare them for the fact that it isn't a very nice city.. I do have a lot of great memories here.

Any people done Erasmus at Paris IV who can contribute?

- Kat
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Eleanor48
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I wonder if you can help, I have a daughter (21) who would like to do a fine art degree in Paris, she has a distinction for the Art foundation course from Oxford Brookes. She has taken a bit time out to work out what to do, and now knows she needs to progress. She has a french boyfriend and is currently doing AS french. Can you advise. it would be wonderful.
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xmarilynx
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(Original post by Eleanor48)
I wonder if you can help, I have a daughter (21) who would like to do a fine art degree in Paris, she has a distinction for the Art foundation course from Oxford Brookes. She has taken a bit time out to work out what to do, and now knows she needs to progress. She has a french boyfriend and is currently doing AS french. Can you advise. it would be wonderful.
I did my undergraduate degree in Paris (German and Politics at the University of Paris VIII) so if you have any specific questions regarding enrolment, finances etc get in touch, I'd be happy to advise you if I can
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kat.lev
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Hi,

The first thing is to choose a uni (or a few!) as they all have different application procedures - you apply direct to the institution in France. There are only a few state unis that would offer such a course in Paris so she'll probably only be applying to one or two anyway. I'm afraid I don't know about the private unis though..

Most unis require at least a B2 French certificate (which you can do through the AF or maybe it's worth asking her French teacher?) This is a little above the A-Level standard but far from fluent. When I applied to uni, I hadn't actually sat my C1 test yet, and they accepted me on the condition that I pass this and provide the cert before I started (and I did - yay!)


She will also need approved translations of her transcripts/certificates so that is something to look into as it's often cheaper if you don't have time pressure.

Kat


(Original post by Eleanor48)
I wonder if you can help, I have a daughter (21) who would like to do a fine art degree in Paris, she has a distinction for the Art foundation course from Oxford Brookes. She has taken a bit time out to work out what to do, and now knows she needs to progress. She has a french boyfriend and is currently doing AS french. Can you advise. it would be wonderful.
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Sonja77
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I got a Maitrise de Philosophie from Paris IV in the '80s, hence over a generation ago when it was open enrollment and tuition-free. It is a great place to study for a Master's, but do not consider it for a Bachelor's and be very cautious about where you do your doctorate. There are very few good reasons to do either of these degrees outside of the English-speaking world. But a Master's -- absolutely. It will broaden your education in ways that nothing else possibly can. I see the difference and appreciate it anew every day.

Also, of course, consider the amount of time needed for each. I spent a total of 5 years outside of the English-speaking world, and had immmigrant parents. This kind-of ruined me for living in the US. If you want to live in the US or UK, etc., best to limit your time to 2 to 3 years, maximum, outside of the English-speaking world. Three years is about perfect. Longer is risky. It would take too long to explain what becoming estranged from your own culture can be like. Although it does confer certain strengths, I cannot in good conscience recommend it.
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TOmzd1
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Could you help me. I really really love studying at Paris 4. However, I just have score of 50% in Grade 12. And I had finished my high school since 2007 , it is for 9 year, i am going to apply to paris sorbonne next year 2017 at LICENCE LLCER ANGLAIS. Do i need only good at English and French? I mean, Do you think I can get into that university? Exactly, i am studying French now, if I get French B2, is that enough?
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Bouilhet
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(Original post by Stéphane)
Is this town Colmar, Strasbourg or Nancy by any chance ? The three of those are beautiful places to visit anyway, Strasbourg and Colmar are a hundred percent German-like as one could expect.

Enjoy your time there, and in Paris ! You'll never be the same
Theoretical question for you: If my goal is to become a university professor of French literature, would it then be worth it for me to go to a French university, at least just for my doctorate? If so, which university would be the best for this? Or, at the end of the day, would a French degree be better from a top English/American university than anything in France?
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Socrates7
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(Original post by Bouilhet)
Theoretical question for you: If my goal is to become a university professor of French literature, would it then be worth it for me to go to a French university, at least just for my doctorate? If so, which university would be the best for this? Or, at the end of the day, would a French degree be better from a top English/American university than anything in France?
Of course it would be worth it!
Normally the classical royal path in French literature after the Bac would be:
1st and 2nd year of Preparatory classes in order to pass the entry exam of the École Normale Supérieure (ENS) and become a civil servant in training for the French government (you get a 1500 euros salary but you have to work for the French for 10 years).
1st year at the ENS and 3rd year of Licence at Université Paris-Sorbonne (Paris IV)
2nd year at the ENS and 1st year of Master's at Paris-Sorbonne
3rd year at the ENS and 2nd year of Master's at Paris-Sorbonne
4th year at the ENS and preparation for the 'Aggrégation' teaching exam
If you pass the 'Aggrégation' congratulations! you can teach now at high school and at some undergrads at certain universities. However, if you want to go further:
3 more years of Doctorate at Paris-Sorbonne

Now, since the ENS opened its admission process (not by altruism but because they needed a more diverse student body because of international rankings) you can also do:

Three years of Licence at a university in France (Paris-Sorbonne is recommended, but also Sorbonne-Nouvelle and Paris-Nanterre).
Admission to the ENS through "dossier": no exams, just the normal application you would expect at a UK university. The difference is that you won't be a training civil servant but you won't get paid either.
1st year at the ENS and 1st year of Master's at Paris-Sorbonne
2nd year at the ENS and 2nd year of Master's at Paris-Sorbonne
3rd year at the ENS and preparation for the 'Aggrégation' teaching exam if you want. If you pass the 'Aggrégation' congratulations! you can teach now at high school and at some undergrads at certain universities.
However, if you want to go further:
3 more years of Doctorate at Paris-Sorbonne

There also a path you can do if you earned your Bachelors outside of France, by gaining entrance to the ENS through the "Séléction internationale" program. You will have to send an application like to a UK university but also sit exams. The Good thing is that you would get a 1000 euros grant per month and no obligations for the French Government and then do:
1st year at the ENS and 1st year of Master's at Paris-Sorbonne
2nd year at the ENS and 2nd year of Master's at Paris-Sorbonne
3rd year at the ENS and you usually are not expected to prepare the Aggregation.
If you want to go further:
3 more years of Doctorate at Paris-Sorbonne

And finally, there is a third way to get into the ENS: through one of their joint-masters. The best in your case would be the one shared with Paris-Sorbonne and the EHESS (School for Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences): Master Lettres, Spécialité Théorie de la littérature.
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Sagnew28
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(Original post by Socrates7)
Of course it would be worth it!
Normally the classical royal path in French literature after the Bac would be:
1st and 2nd year of Preparatory classes in order to pass the entry exam of the École Normale Supérieure (ENS) and become a civil servant in training for the French government (you get a 1500 euros salary but you have to work for the French for 10 years).
1st year at the ENS and 3rd year of Licence at Université Paris-Sorbonne (Paris IV)
2nd year at the ENS and 1st year of Master's at Paris-Sorbonne
3rd year at the ENS and 2nd year of Master's at Paris-Sorbonne
4th year at the ENS and preparation for the 'Aggrégation' teaching exam
If you pass the 'Aggrégation' congratulations! you can teach now at high school and at some undergrads at certain universities. However, if you want to go further:
3 more years of Doctorate at Paris-Sorbonne

Now, since the ENS opened its admission process (not by altruism but because they needed a more diverse student body because of international rankings) you can also do:

Three years of Licence at a university in France (Paris-Sorbonne is recommended, but also Sorbonne-Nouvelle and Paris-Nanterre).
Admission to the ENS through "dossier": no exams, just the normal application you would expect at a UK university. The difference is that you won't be a training civil servant but you won't get paid either.
1st year at the ENS and 1st year of Master's at Paris-Sorbonne
2nd year at the ENS and 2nd year of Master's at Paris-Sorbonne
3rd year at the ENS and preparation for the 'Aggrégation' teaching exam if you want. If you pass the 'Aggrégation' congratulations! you can teach now at high school and at some undergrads at certain universities.
However, if you want to go further:
3 more years of Doctorate at Paris-Sorbonne

There also a path you can do if you earned your Bachelors outside of France, by gaining entrance to the ENS through the "Séléction internationale" program. You will have to send an application like to a UK university but also sit exams. The Good thing is that you would get a 1000 euros grant per month and no obligations for the French Government and then do:
1st year at the ENS and 1st year of Master's at Paris-Sorbonne
2nd year at the ENS and 2nd year of Master's at Paris-Sorbonne
3rd year at the ENS and you usually are not expected to prepare the Aggregation.
If you want to go further:
3 more years of Doctorate at Paris-Sorbonne

And finally, there is a third way to get into the ENS: through one of their joint-masters. The best in your case would be the one shared with Paris-Sorbonne and the EHESS (School for Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences): Master Lettres, Spécialité Théorie de la littérature.
Is it hard to get into that Sorbonne school in France and pairs?
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