Why is glucose a good energy source? Watch

spoinkytheduck
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#1
I tried looking this up with no success, but what is it about the structure of glucose that makes it ideal for respiration etc. ?

Thanks
0
reply
Chwirkytheappleboy
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#2
Report 7 years ago
#2
It is readily available as source of energy in many foods, either in its direct form, or as a derivative of most amino acids (if memory serves me correctly only Leucine and Lysine aren't gluconeogenic)

It's a polar molecule so is water soluble and can be carried around in the blood in an unbound form. The corollary of that is that it's not lipid soluble so can't pass through cell membranes by passive diffusion; it requires transporter proteins so its levels can be easily controlled according to tissue needs.

It can be easily polymerised and stored as glycogen for use as a fast energy source

Its metabolism can vary depending on substrate availability. In the absence of oxygen it can be used in anaerobic respiration to produce a small amount of ATP and lactate. Lactate can then later be converted back to pyruvate. In the presence of oxygen it enter the TCA cycle and produce much larger amounts of ATP (aerobic respiration). Acetyl-CoA (one of the products of glucose metabolism part way along the pathway) can be converted to fat for long term energy storage

There's a starter for ten... I'm sure other people will come up with some more
0
reply
thegodofgod
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#3
Report 7 years ago
#3
(Original post by spoinkytheduck)
I tried looking this up with no success, but what is it about the structure of glucose that makes it ideal for respiration etc. ?

Thanks
Glucose is the human body's key source of energy, through aerobic respiration, providing approximately 3.75 kCal (16 kJ) of food energy per gram. Breakdown of carbohydrates (e.g. starch) yields mono- and disaccharides, most of which is glucose. Through glycolysis and later in the reactions of the Krebs cycle, glucose is oxidized to eventually form CO2 and H2O in the electron transport chain, yielding energy sources, mostly in the form of ATP.

Fats and proteins are not good sources of immediate energy release, because they must undergo complicated digestive and metabolic processes prior to supplying the working body with energy.

Fructose is not very good; it enters the bloodstream much more slowly than glucose, and anywhere from 40% to 80% of people are unable to fully absorb fructose when supplied in a solution; some people can only absorb less than 15 g of fructose at a given time.

A cool fact: Absorption of glucose is so efficient, that the body may be able to absorb 20 lbs of glucose in a 24-hour period.

Have a look here:
http://www.gleukos.com/science/pdf/GlucoseScience.pdf
0
reply
spoinkytheduck
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#4
thank you!!
0
reply
Aamir Broh
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#5
Report 4 months ago
#5
Because it has carbon linked to oxygen.
0
reply
Aamir Broh
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#6
Report 4 months ago
#6
Because it has carbon linked to oxygen.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • Solent University
    Postgraduate and Professional Open Evenings Postgraduate
    Mon, 25 Mar '19
  • Cardiff University
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Wed, 27 Mar '19
  • University of Portsmouth
    Postgraduate and Part-Time Open Evenings Postgraduate
    Wed, 27 Mar '19

Where do you need more help?

Which Uni should I go to? (140)
18.16%
How successful will I become if I take my planned subjects? (78)
10.12%
How happy will I be if I take this career? (132)
17.12%
How do I achieve my dream Uni placement? (109)
14.14%
What should I study to achieve my dream career? (76)
9.86%
How can I be the best version of myself? (236)
30.61%

Watched Threads

View All