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Should I pray the price for my GCSE results and attend an average Uni? watch

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    Hey,
    You see I am predicted grades AAAAa in English Literature, History, Psychology, Sociology and Critical Thinking, respectively, grades which I presume are good under any standard. However, during my GCSE's there was considerable family turmoil and I achieved terrible GCSE results, and when I mean terrible I don't mean it in the pathetic sense like some idiots in this forum do (Mr or Ms X - 'oh I have terrible GCSE's 5 A*, 4 A's and 2B's). My GCSE results are really terrible - 8 passes, almost all C. I applied for law, but so far the prestigious universities have declined (Cambridge and LSE), I am waiting for Kings and UCL, though I am not hopeful.

    I have talked to the admissions people at LSE but they very rudely said that they did not believe that I could ever achieve those A level predictions and that my AS grades AAAB were because AS is about memory and not intelligence and that I had a good memory (lol). I have been accepted to Queen Mary which I guess is decent but they require AA's. Now, if i am going to achieve 540 points, is it really just for me to go to a university which wants 240 points, or should I pay the price for my GCSE results with an almost certailyn less prosperous life and attend Queen Mary?. What do you guys think, shall I take a gap year, improve myself and comeback with the results (hopefully the predicted AAAAa) and re-apply (and not to god damn LSE or Cambridge, maybe SOAS and Oxford this time).
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    Considering your circumstances, I would advocate withdrawing from UCAS and taking a year out before reapplying, if you are confident of achieving these grades that is. Under those circumstances you could go back to LSE.etc., and say - look, I obviously do have the intelligence, and you will have a chance of getting a place more befitting your calibre.

    Saying that though, university is what you make of it, so if you went to UCL or Kings and worked to the best of your ability, you would leave with a degree of a very high quality, denoted you could have perhaps attended somewhere better.

    But, Obviously I do not know if there is much institution-based snobbery for law.

    Good luck anyway
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    Heya. Personally I would never attend a place where I would have a feeling that I should be somewhere better. My gcses were not great either (4Bs 6Cs), however my A-Levels are considerably higher, and Ive managed to get offers from some very good universities. This is also after an extra year as after I achieved certain grades last year I decided to wait another year to get into a better uni. UCL and KCL are both amazing unis and if you get a place at either then jump on it. However, I would personally gap year if you are not attending an institution you deserve to do so.

    Good luck!
    Dan
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    I'm convinced it was my GCSE grades that in the end crippled my application, so if you have the chance to reapply do so, I didn't.
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    You can always accept, then turn them down after you get your results if they're good enough and reapply elsewhere next year, right?
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    Thanks everyone, I guess re-applying is the best option. But does ones activity during gap year affect their application, i presume they do but I am not sure.
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    I think you should definitely withdraw and apply post A-level - that way you'll hopefully have got the As and then they'll be forced to acknowledge that your GCSEs were an aberration and that you're capable of doing better when there aren't circumstances that get in the way. And you could very well do something in your gap year that helps, maybe try and get some kind of internship thing in a law firm if possible (though I don't know how easy that is), or at least do something related to show that you're dedicated and capable of doing well despite previous poor results. You might also want to take the opportunity to learn a foreign language if you don't already have one (or if you do, learn another one!) - as far as I can tell that will be a plus point anywhere, even if you're applying for law, plus it's something academic so you won't forget how to work during your year off.
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    I think if a university is going to reject you just because you didn't get A's at GCSE, then it's their loss, not yours.

    There's no harm in applying to more 'prestigious' universities if you want to Also, being rejected only makes you stronger... Or so I've heard...
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    Maybe get your school to send them a letter saying that you had issues at the time you took your GCSE's? Im in a similarish position, although my GCSEs arent that bad (just not gd enough for top places)- and I also had some family issues at the time
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    (Original post by guitargirl03)
    I think if a university is going to reject you just because you didn't get A's at GCSE, then it's their loss, not yours.
    Thats crap though, isn't it - because its his loss too. He is the one who doesn't get the best possible place he deserves and He is the one who could suffer as a result in the future.
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    Get your A level results, then apply. Or get a letter to the admissions officers from your college explaining your application.
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    Correct forum please.
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    you made me laugh with your impression of "Mr or Ms X - 'oh I have terrible GCSE's 5 A*, 4 A's and 2B's"! god, there's so many people on here that act like that. and it really winds me up!
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    I have talked to the admissions people at LSE but they very rudely said that they did not believe that I could ever achieve those A level predictions and that my AS grades AAAB were because AS is about memory and not intelligence and that I had a good memory (lol)
    Well thats a bit silly... if as level is all about memory then gcse's are more so.
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    (Original post by notsoperfect)
    you made me laugh with your impression of "Mr or Ms X - 'oh I have terrible GCSE's 5 A*, 4 A's and 2B's"! god, there's so many people on here that act like that. and it really winds me up!
    lol i was thinking the same, people are a bit obessed with such matters
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    And A levels are no less all about memory.
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    (Original post by bikerx23)
    Thats crap though, isn't it - because its his loss too. He is the one who doesn't get the best possible place he deserves and He is the one who could suffer as a result in the future.
    What do you mean by "He is the one who doesn't get the best possible place he deserves?" A university is going to teach basically the same subject, wherever you go.
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    Why don't you go for another subject? After all you don't need a degree in law to be lawyer.
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    (Original post by guitargirl03)
    What do you mean by "He is the one who doesn't get the best possible place he deserves?" A university is going to teach basically the same subject, wherever you go.
    Certainly the top 20 are going to be similar. I've heard that UEA offer a very good law course.
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    take a gap year and re-apply (as others said). Don't settle for anything less that you deserve!!!!
 
 
 
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