Salmaa!
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Is it 4+ or 4-, and why?

Thank you!
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thegodofgod
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#2
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(Original post by Salmaa!)
Is it 4+ or 4-, and why?

Thank you!
It depends on what it's bonded to

Just like carbon, it can have +4 or -4, as it can either lose 4 electrons (+4) or gain 4 electrons (-4) (They are both in group 4, C is period 2, Si is period 3).

If you have Carbon tetrachloride (a.k.a. Tetrachloromethane), the Carbon would be +4, as Chlorine is more electronegative, so it would be -1 each.

If you have Methane, however, the Carbon would be -4, as Hydrogen pretty much always has an oxidation state of +1.

You can just apply those principles to Silicon
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Salmaa!
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#3
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(Original post by thegodofgod)
It depends on what it's bonded to

Just like carbon, it can have +4 or -4, as it can either lose 4 electrons (+4) or gain 4 electrons (-4) (They are both in group 4, C is period 2, Si is period 3).

If you have Carbon tetrachloride (a.k.a. Tetrachloromethane), the Carbon would be +4, as Chlorine is more electronegative, so it would be -1 each.

If you have Methane, however, the Carbon would be -4, as Hydrogen pretty much always has an oxidation state of +1.

You can just apply those principles to Silicon

Aah I see, thank you very much +rep
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illusionz
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#4
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(Original post by thegodofgod)
It depends on what it's bonded to

Just like carbon, it can have +4 or -4, as it can either lose 4 electrons (+4) or gain 4 electrons (-4) (They are both in group 4, C is period 2, Si is period 3).

If you have Carbon tetrachloride (a.k.a. Tetrachloromethane), the Carbon would be +4, as Chlorine is more electronegative, so it would be -1 each.

If you have Methane, however, the Carbon would be -4, as Hydrogen pretty much always has an oxidation state of +1.

You can just apply those principles to Silicon

(Original post by Salmaa!)
Aah I see, thank you very much +rep
I just feel I should point out there is a big, big difference between oxidation state and the charge of the ion. You will never, I repeat, never, come across a silicon 4+ or 4- ion, the same goes for carbon.

They are fundamentally different things - don't write the wrong thing in an exam!
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05sykesd
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(Original post by illusionz)
I just feel I should point out there is a big, big difference between oxidation state and the charge of the ion. You will never, I repeat, never, come across a silicon 4+ or 4- ion, the same goes for carbon.

They are fundamentally different things - don't write the wrong thing in an exam!
This.
They are very different things indeed
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thegodofgod
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(Original post by illusionz)
I just feel I should point out there is a big, big difference between oxidation state and the charge of the ion. You will never, I repeat, never, come across a silicon 4+ or 4- ion, the same goes for carbon.

They are fundamentally different things - don't write the wrong thing in an exam!
:eek:

I presumed OP meant oxidation state

Anyway, what about carbides, like tungsten carbide?
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illusionz
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(Original post by thegodofgod)
:eek:

I presumed OP meant oxidation state

Anyway, what about carbides, like tungsten carbide?
Ok, perhaps not never. I was thinking in the realms of organic chemistry/ions in solution.

Should have known there would be an exception. There always is in chemistry! Even supposedly quantum mechanically forbitten processes can take place

And I would assume the OP did mean oxidation state.
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Salmaa!
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#8
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(Original post by thegodofgod)
:eek:

I presumed OP meant oxidation state

Anyway, what about carbides, like tungsten carbide?

(Original post by illusionz)
Ok, perhaps not never. I was thinking in the realms of organic chemistry/ions in solution.

Should have known there would be an exception. There always is in chemistry! Even supposedly quantum mechanically forbitten processes can take place

And I would assume the OP did mean oxidation state.
I did, my bad thanks for the correction
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CabdiRaxy
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#9
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Guys, what about Silicon Carbide. Can someone tell me what the individual charges for both would be? Thanks.
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Pigster
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#10
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(Original post by CabdiRaxy)
Guys, what about Silicon Carbide. Can someone tell me what the individual charges for both would be? Thanks.
I'll bet that after five years, you're unlikely to get a reply off any of the guys who originally were involved.

Why do you think the atoms in silicon carbide should be charged?
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Nad18
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#11
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#11
What is stable ion for silicon
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_bik
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#12
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What happens to elemental Si in a spectrometer ionisation chamber?
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