Differences between Computing and Computer Science Courses? Watch

Dalendless Shid
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My assumption was that Computer Science was more mathematically/Theory based.. Whereas Computing in it's own right, was more applied and practical.

Can anyone clarify on this? Are they just 2 names for the same thing? Modules can appear very similiar, but, many Uni's run them both, so They cannot be the same thing.

Any thoughts? :yy:
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james101
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I also would like to know the answer to this.
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nikki
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From other posts which have asked the same thing, I've gathered that between universities, the name is just a name, one university's idea of computing may well be more technical than another's idea of computer science, you'd have to look at the actual module content to decide.

Although, when looking at courses I noticed a trend similar to your assumption, when both were offered, the computing course generally wasn't as technical and usually had a lower maths requirement.
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Navajo
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Be warned, Computer Science is very different to Computing.

Computer Science is very theory based and involves a lot of the fundamental principals of computers, such as discrete mathematics like sets, functions matricies etc... It also involves usually Java, C, and prolog programming.

Computing is the use of computers the hardware and software. Like network systems, programming at high level, entity diagrams and business management.

Be sure to choose the right course. Computer Science is definatly a degree for mathematically minded people who have an interest in computers, Computing on the other hand is for people who have an interest in computers but not at a low level.
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Mike Z
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I'm not really sure whether that is true regarding the amount of Maths. As you may have noticed Imperial College only run Computing and not Computer Science and I'm sure their course is mathematically based. So I think you've really got to be careful of where you are looking, and really need to look more carefully at the content of the courses and modules.
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Navajo
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The amount of maths is true?? Are you a CS student?
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Mike Z
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When I say maths, I mean the amount of maths on computing courses rather than on CS courses. As I said it's best to look at the syllabus for the content of the courses/modeules as some may be misleading.
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ZigZag
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(Original post by Navajo)
Be warned, Computer Science is very different to Computing.

Computer Science is very theory based and involves a lot of the fundamental principals of computers, such as discrete mathematics like sets, functions matricies etc... It also involves usually Java, C, and prolog programming.

Computing is the use of computers the hardware and software. Like network systems, programming at high level, entity diagrams and business management.

Be sure to choose the right course. Computer Science is definatly a degree for mathematically minded people who have an interest in computers, Computing on the other hand is for people who have an interest in computers but not at a low level.
Untrue.

The material covered by a CS degree at one university may share more with a Computing degree at another than a CS degree at the same place. For example, my CS degree at Manchester shares a lot of material with a Computing degree at Imperial. However, to further contradict what you said, one of the differences is that the Imperial degree contains more maths than mine.

My advice would be just to consider the courses on individual merit.
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Dalendless Shid
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I've applied for Computing/Computing Studies, I sure hope the Maths element is minimal in contrast to the CS degrees.

Otherwise stress levels will vastly increase. :p:
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dragons_circle
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Bah, you should have gone for ICT :p:
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stoney
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I think imperial is the exception to the rule here though. Navajo's general rule in most cases you will find will apply. (although i may be biased as i'm lookin forward to doin some hefty maths in my CS degree)
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20083
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Why do people not just read the course descriptions, lists of modules and module descriptions? You need an insight into the course that you are applying for specific to the university that you are doing it at. A general description between the two is only good for someone that has no intention doing either.

Computing science in Aberdeen...
http://www.csd.abdn.ac.uk/teaching/c...l=2&active=yes
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