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    (Original post by Dr. Bassman)
    The judo was fine for it. Kickboxing made it a lot worse though. I've stopped doing martial arts (except some boxing) until I've recovered from surgery. Judo started becoming a problem when my legs would split if someone went for a throw.

    Anyway, the surgery should sort it out and I'll be able to do a lot of stuff I physically couldn't do before which should be sweet.

    EDIT:

    Everyone be really passive aggressive laawl.

    Id never make fun of a disability. fair enough, you could just go with muay thai without throwing any knees i suppose.
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    (Original post by Indo-Chinese Food)
    Id never make fun of a disability. fair enough, you could just go with muay thai without throwing any knees i suppose.
    It's not exactly a disability. It's just a bone structure problem which surgery ought to fix. It's not particularly rare. Muay thai is no good either, anything that requires kicks is no good at the moment.

    http://www.noc.nhs.uk/hipandknee/inf...mpingement.gif

    Mine is a sort of mixed one with muscle damage as well.

    The problem comes whenever I need to split my legs so roundhouse kicks, side kicks are actually impossible, let alone painful. Knees are actually fine on my right leg (the problem is on my left hip) but I have problems on both legs when I do any legs that require me splitting my legs. I also have problems doing front kicks and axe kicks, I can't do them on my left leg but i've reached a point of flexibility where the hip is blocking movement in my right leg too.

    It got pretty bad around december when I started training almost everyday and started damaging the muscle. I started noticing it when stepping over things etc. Took me four whole months to get a date for surgery (well technically I don't have an exact date but i've agreed with the surgeon on the general time, just has to be confirmed now).
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    (Original post by Dr. Bassman)
    It's not exactly a disability. It's just a bone structure problem which surgery ought to fix. It's not particularly rare. Muay thai is no good either, anything that requires kicks is no good at the moment.

    http://www.noc.nhs.uk/hipandknee/inf...mpingement.gif

    Mine is a sort of mixed one with muscle damage as well.

    The problem comes whenever I need to split my legs so roundhouse kicks, side kicks are actually impossible, let alone painful. Knees are actually fine on my right leg (the problem is on my left hip) but I have problems on both legs when I do any legs that require me splitting my legs. I also have problems doing front kicks and axe kicks, I can't do them on my left leg but i've reached a point of flexibility where the hip is blocking movement in my right leg too.

    It got pretty bad around december when I started training almost everyday and started damaging the muscle. I started noticing it when stepping over things etc. Took me four whole months to get a date for surgery (well technically I don't have an exact date but i've agreed with the surgeon on the general time, just has to be confirmed now).
    No disrespect but are you sure martial arts are for you?


    Anyway if this fight happens I want to be there to record it lol
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    (Original post by Busby_Babe)
    No disrespect but are you sure martial arts are for you?
    Lol, none taken

    The problem is a bit odd. It's just a bone structure deformation... it's not like there's weakness in the joints or muscles, it's simply that the bone has formed incorrectly and so blocks certain movements. Once the surgery is done I should be just as capable as anyone with a normal hip. Unless surgery goes wrong there shouldn't be any recurring effects.

    Even if I couldn't fix the problems I would still fight. It's not an injury so as long as I don't try and push it I could still fight with the problem. I'd be able to box with no problems whatsoever and some BJJ/judo would be fine too. The problem with it is that I'm more of a kickboxer and I've had kickboxing fights with the problem and performed well despite not being able to do certain moves. Unless the surgery goes horrifically badly i'll be able to fight with a greater variety of attacks.
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    (Original post by Dr. Bassman)
    Lol, none taken

    The problem is a bit odd. It's just a bone structure deformation... it's not like there's weakness in the joints or muscles, it's simply that the bone has formed incorrectly and so blocks certain movements. Once the surgery is done I should be just as capable as anyone with a normal hip. Unless surgery goes wrong there shouldn't be any recurring effects.

    Even if I couldn't fix the problems I would still fight. It's not an injury so as long as I don't try and push it I could still fight with the problem. I'd be able to box with no problems whatsoever and some BJJ/judo would be fine too. The problem with it is that I'm more of a kickboxer and I've had kickboxing fights with the problem and performed well despite not being able to do certain moves. Unless the surgery goes horrifically badly i'll be able to fight with a greater variety of attacks.
    Ahh I think I understand so basically it's not an injury it just restricts movement?

    Most martial arts instructors would be very understanding of something like that. I had knee surgery a while ago and every know and then it flares up. I just ask people to avoid it in training and it's not a problem. You get people who are naturally very inflexible so are limited yet they still enjoy training. These type of things are common.

    Probably best to ask a doctor though. Maybe watch some beginner BJJ videos and see how much of it you would be able to do. If it's only one or two things then okay but if you can't do say 50% of the techniques then there probably isn't much point investing your time and money.
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    (Original post by Busby_Babe)
    Ahh I think I understand so basically it's not an injury it just restricts movement?

    Most martial arts instructors would be very understanding of something like that. I had knee surgery a while ago and every know and then it flares up. I just ask people to avoid it in training and it's not a problem. You get people who are naturally very inflexible so are limited yet they still enjoy training. These type of things are common.

    Probably best to ask a doctor though. Maybe watch some beginner BJJ videos and see how much of it you would be able to do. If it's only one or two things then okay but if you can't do say 50% of the techniques then there probably isn't much point investing your time and money.
    Yeah, but it's very painful when I try to push my limits haha. That's how I did the muscle damage because I pushed it when I started training hard everyday.

    My coach is very understanding of it. Back before I put a hold on kickboxing I did like four months only using techniques I could do instead of what was being practised (so i'd just do leg kicks while people did high kicks etc.) but eventually when the muscle became too damaged I had to stop because those became painful. I can fight with it (and have) as long as I don't try certain attacks... if someone hips me in the area there's no pain whatsoever, that's why it's not really an injury.

    I have asked a doctor lol, I'm having surgery on it in late June. Basically I've just stopped all martial arts except boxing. I do judo so I know my limits in grappling. There aren't that many at intermediate level that are problematic, getting my hooks in can sometimes be awkward on my hip if I have to do it quickly but it's only advanced stuff like rubber guards that I wouldn't be able to do. One thing I'm looking forward to after surgery is being able to snap on triangle chokes and armbars more quickly. Normally I have to awkward move my legs and hips around, quite slowly and methodically, but after surgery i'll be able to split them quickly to get triangles and armbars from the guard and transitioning from back mount to armbars which is one of my favourite techniques.

    I am really excited about the surgery to be honest. It's going to open up a ton of new possibilities for me in both striking and grappling haha.
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    (Original post by Busby_Babe)

    Anyway if this fight happens I want to be there to record it lol
    He didnt turn up
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    (Original post by Einheri)
    What did you quote me for? I never said I was gonna fly out from frickin' Iceland to watch you get metaphorically buttraped. Stop trying to rustle my jimmies.

    SEHughes, are you really going to puss out now? He's a bloody Chunner; what's he going to do slap you to death? Drown you in his own blood? :rolleyes:
    Ha! What juvenile bull crap. Do you know why wing chun is practiced open-hand? its to avoid breaking the other guys jaw during chi sao training, which develops speed and accuracy - ie the principle of centre line, penetrating guard and first strike. if they can get through with an open palm, they can get through with a closed fist. It takes jsut 450-500 pounds of force for someone to deliver a concussion ( knock out to you) by punch, most highly trained wing chun martial artists punch much more than that. many can free-punch through inch-thick timber boards without a problem - more than enough to shatter your jaw in many places and put a ****wit like you to sleep.
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    (Original post by I-Am-A-Tripod)
    Ha! What juvenile bull crap. Do you know why wing chun is practiced open-hand? its to avoid breaking the other guys jaw during chi sao training, which develops speed and accuracy - ie the principle of centre line, penetrating guard and first strike. if they can get through with an open palm, they can get through with a closed fist. It takes jsut 450-500 pounds of force for someone to deliver a concussion ( knock out to you) by punch, most highly trained wing chun martial artists punch much more than that. many can free-punch through inch-thick timber boards without a problem - more than enough to shatter your jaw in many places and put a ****wit like you to sleep.
    I dont think you need to know wing chun to be able to punch that hard .
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    (Original post by Z-Ninja)
    I dont think you need to know wing chun to be able to punch that hard .
    Here did i say you did? I just made the point to the ignorants who think wt is all open hand slaps etc that have F all in terms of experience of said martial arts that theres more than enough stopping power. Plus speed of strike is faster than most stand up techniques (wing chun was the inspiration of bruce lees one inch punch theory) If you masrer the art of knock out power at close range and can land quicker than an attacker , well you can go figure out the rest.
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    (Original post by I-Am-A-Tripod)
    Here did i say you did? I just made the point to the ignorants who think wt is all open hand slaps etc that have F all in terms of experience of said martial arts that theres more than enough stopping power. Plus speed of strike is faster than most stand up techniques (wing chun was the inspiration of bruce lees one inch punch theory) If you masrer the art of knock out power at close range and can land quicker than an attacker , well you can go figure out the rest.
    lol, wing chun consists of punches, open hand palm strikes, elbows, slaps, etc etc.. Wing chun punches are known for they'r explosiveness and speed which makes them quite deadly. Like chain punching the center line. The quickest distance between you and the opponent is a straightline and thats what wing chun focus's on.

    Lets look at this in a modern day street prospective. Firstly for a wing chun punch to be delivered with such force and accuracy you need to be in quite a close range which can be very difficult as the other guy (lets assume un experienced) is going to bombard you with hooks and would most likely go for a headlock or another grab. To maintain the wing chun stance without being thrown around is quite hard lol. Secondly the most obvious non-experienced street fight move would be to swing right or left, if you know how to fight getting to your opponent first wouldn't be a problem as your punch would be alot more faster.

    Well all this im generalising as anything can happen in a streetfight, it also depends on the person not the style, but you can see where im coming from lol.
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    Hi everyone, i practiced shotokan karate for a year and then stopped, i was just wondering why it isn't seen as effective or good in "real" fights.
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    Hi there,

    Basically I am posting on here to ask people's opinion of traditional ju jitsu?

    I just to train in Tang Soo Do and had achieved 2nd dan status. I'm starting university in september (Leicester if anyone wants to know) and they have three martial arts clubs - karate, ju jitsu and tae kwon do. I looked at ju jitsu and I thought it might be nice to try an art with more grappling and groundwork as opposed to predominantly striking techniques. I also like the sound of training with swords and bo. What do you guys think?

    Thanks
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    (Original post by TCalderbank)
    Hi there,

    Basically I am posting on here to ask people's opinion of traditional ju jitsu?

    I just to train in Tang Soo Do and had achieved 2nd dan status. I'm starting university in september (Leicester if anyone wants to know) and they have three martial arts clubs - karate, ju jitsu and tae kwon do. I looked at ju jitsu and I thought it might be nice to try an art with more grappling and groundwork as opposed to predominantly striking techniques. I also like the sound of training with swords and bo. What do you guys think?

    Thanks
    It's good if its trained good, i.e very alive with lots of randori. Otherwise you're just...fighting air and dancing in your pyjamas.
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    (Original post by TCalderbank)
    Hi there,

    Basically I am posting on here to ask people's opinion of traditional ju jitsu?

    I just to train in Tang Soo Do and had achieved 2nd dan status. I'm starting university in september (Leicester if anyone wants to know) and they have three martial arts clubs - karate, ju jitsu and tae kwon do. I looked at ju jitsu and I thought it might be nice to try an art with more grappling and groundwork as opposed to predominantly striking techniques. I also like the sound of training with swords and bo. What do you guys think?

    Thanks

    Depends on which ryu of jj you settle on, there are literally hundreds. also depends on what you what to achieve out of it, if its for combat self defence use, there are school that describe themselves as 'combat ju jitsu' which are used to train police officers and personal protection professionals.
    If its simply ground grappling and sub-ing you are looking for, brazilian ju jtsu is currently the flavour of the month , but id suggest to train it properly not in a watered down cage-fighting class.
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    (Original post by Z-Ninja)
    lol, wing chun consists of punches, open hand palm strikes, elbows, slaps, etc etc.. Wing chun punches are known for they'r explosiveness and speed which makes them quite deadly. Like chain punching the center line. The quickest distance between you and the opponent is a straightline and thats what wing chun focus's on.

    Lets look at this in a modern day street prospective. Firstly for a wing chun punch to be delivered with such force and accuracy you need to be in quite a close range which can be very difficult as the other guy (lets assume un experienced) is going to bombard you with hooks and would most likely go for a headlock or another grab. To maintain the wing chun stance without being thrown around is quite hard lol. Secondly the most obvious non-experienced street fight move would be to swing right or left, if you know how to fight getting to your opponent first wouldn't be a problem as your punch would be alot more faster.

    Well all this im generalising as anything can happen in a streetfight, it also depends on the person not the style, but you can see where im coming from lol.
    Not really, cant really make sense of what point youre trying to make :dontknow:. Your first paragraph just repeated what i first said, the second is a lot of random muttering and smiley faces . If in 'street fight' someone is swingin hooks, hes going to get knocked the **** out with a straight or inside shot that is going to land much sooner dummy.
    If you followed the post i had made, it was about being able to throw a the power of a knockout punch, which isnt difficult- the skill in 1on1 is developing their reactions, speed and accuracy to land when needed. proper boxers throw at well over 1000 pounds of which only athird is needed bare knuckle, but they train speed and accuracy and throwing combinations which is far more important
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    (Original post by I-Am-A-Tripod)
    Not really, cant really make sense of what point youre trying to make :dontknow:. Your first paragraph just repeated what i first said, the second is a lot of random muttering and smiley faces . If in 'street fight' someone is swingin hooks, hes going to get knocked the **** out with a straight or inside shot that is going to land much sooner dummy.
    If you followed the post i had made, it was about being able to throw a the power of a knockout punch, which isnt difficult- the skill in 1on1 is developing their reactions, speed and accuracy to land when needed. proper boxers throw at well over 1000 pounds of which only athird is needed bare knuckle, but they train speed and accuracy and throwing combinations which is far more important


    And also that wing tsun is all about punching from a centre line, using largely the triceps and hip, as oppossed to boxers who use the whole shoulder and body weight, principle being that holding the centre line lands the punch before taking the outside line ( all things remaining equal). Knowing the history of it, the idea is to land first, not land hardest, in terms of body mechanics the guys that strikes from the centre line always lands first, hence why they practice chi sau daily. SO power isnt that important, wing tsun is like a chess amtch trinaing to spot a hole inthe opponenets gaurd then attacking it, with multiple flurry of shots, and ending a fight there and then, which is why it isnt suited to organised cage or competition tournments, but very suited for facing a na attacker and knocking their teeth back into their throat in less than a quarter of a second.
    ignore comments of einheris lot btw, you have to accept on a student internet martial arts forum you will get dimwits with more opinions that braincells about this sort of stuff - its a shame they dont choose to create and stick to a wrestling or cage forum
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    (Original post by Indo-Chinese Food)
    And also that wing tsun is all about punching from a centre line, using largely the triceps and hip, as oppossed to boxers who use the whole shoulder and body weight, principle being that holding the centre line lands the punch before taking the outside line ( all things remaining equal). Knowing the history of it, the idea is to land first, not land hardest, in terms of body mechanics the guys that strikes from the centre line always lands first, hence why they practice chi sau daily. SO power isnt that important, wing tsun is like a chess amtch trinaing to spot a hole inthe opponenets gaurd then attacking it, with multiple flurry of shots, and ending a fight there and then, which is why it isnt suited to organised cage or competition tournments, but very suited for facing a na attacker and knocking their teeth back into their throat in less than a quarter of a second.
    ignore comments of einheris lot btw, you have to accept on a student internet martial arts forum you will get dimwits with more opinions that braincells about this sort of stuff - its a shame they dont choose to create and stick to a wrestling or cage forum
    Power is not unimportant, there plenty of demos showing a small wing chun guy throwing much larger lads accross the room using one-inch punch technique. that is largely for show and the point is it is less important, than speed, number of hits and accuracy. Teh point of wing chun always was that anyon could use it to defend themselves, given it was invented by a 5 ft tall woman. its designed to apply scientific princples to puching/striking, so the minimum amount of force needed to KO someone can be delivered faster than- you didnt need to be in the gym getting yourslef to 100 kg size to deliver knockout blows. Better to land a flurry of 5 short sharp shots to the bridge of the nose than one huge haymaker than anyone can see coming - good quality wing chun fighter has learnt the basic well and keeps it simple, so that he finds an ealry opening through your guard then attacks with multiple punches rather than the typical martial art trait of one spectacualr 'stand and admire move' ie this sort of level of speed.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v2xr1Gyt5vE
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    (Original post by I-Am-A-Tripod)
    Power is not unimportant, there plenty of demos showing a small wing chun guy throwing much larger lads accross the room using one-inch punch technique. that is largely for show and the point is it is less important, than speed, number of hits and accuracy. Teh point of wing chun always was that anyon could use it to defend themselves, given it was invented by a 5 ft tall woman. its designed to apply scientific princples to puching/striking, so the minimum amount of force needed to KO someone can be delivered faster than- you didnt need to be in the gym getting yourslef to 100 kg size to deliver knockout blows. Better to land a flurry of 5 short sharp shots to the bridge of the nose than one huge haymaker than anyone can see coming - good quality wing chun fighter has learnt the basic well and keeps it simple, so that he finds an ealry opening through your guard then attacks with multiple punches rather than the typical martial art trait of one spectacualr 'stand and admire move' ie this sort of level of speed.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v2xr1Gyt5vE


    Whebnever i have seen wing tusn guys go at it, the principle is basically wait for the other to make a mistake, ie moves off balance, so the other then breaks through his guard or bridge, and then yes he can land then 3-5 good shots at close range, the fight is over. WHat i was always interested in is the point that they leanr to react to the opponent and predict what they will do, so when a punch is thrown , you pre-empt his block or evasive maneover, and are allready folowing up with the next strike. It can be very useful in just that sudden explosvie situations where someone jsut looks at you the wrong way and you know that a punch, kick etc is on its way. I do prefer though the modern schools , that since maybe the 90s like in london have taught a more 'street smart' ssytem of wing tusn, with a bettr focus on feet movement and mobility, as opossed to jsut standing there and trading. It makes sense that you are ready to counter someone diving for your legs and initially taking your fists out the equation, with a fast sprawl or knee to the incoming head.
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    (Original post by Indo-Chinese Food)
    Whebnever i have seen wing tusn guys go at it, the principle is basically wait for the other to make a mistake, ie moves off balance, so the other then breaks through his guard or bridge, and then yes he can land then 3-5 good shots at close range, the fight is over. WHat i was always interested in is the point that they leanr to react to the opponent and predict what they will do, so when a punch is thrown , you pre-empt his block or evasive maneover, and are allready folowing up with the next strike. It can be very useful in just that sudden explosvie situations where someone jsut looks at you the wrong way and you know that a punch, kick etc is on its way. I do prefer though the modern schools , that since maybe the 90s like in london have taught a more 'street smart' ssytem of wing tusn, with a bettr focus on feet movement and mobility, as opossed to jsut standing there and trading. It makes sense that you are ready to counter someone diving for your legs and initially taking your fists out the equation, with a fast sprawl or knee to the incoming head.
    The basics in WC are that you are able to attack and defend at the same time, so you have to train response time and also learn to react to what you opponent is doing the idea is to hit and not be hit, ,rather than just cover up and eat some punches, like say a cornered boxer might do.
    Which is why training chi sau is so important, becuas thats where you learn reaction speed. . Obviously in practicing generally you do so with open hand rather than fist, but each time guard is penetrated, and a 'slap' landed, that translates to a sucessful strike, - obviously with the real good guys each translates to effectively a jaw-breaker. the better you get, the less gets through and the more you land in counter so much so the top guys do chi sau eyes closed, and jsut rely on the force they are feeling from their opponent to know when to strike.

    It looks precarious, but the science is sound, the reason they stand they way the do and punch only from the centre is that when they do and dont allow the shoulder to follow through with the punch, it gives protection form opponents punch form reaching your own head

    Boztepe explains it better in demonstration than i can - here from 1.25


 
 
 
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