Journalism Watch

Cessie
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#21
Report 12 years ago
#21
(Original post by Casey)
That's certainly not true . In fact, the large majority of the journalists I've met have done some other degree (from English Lit. to Chemistry) and then moved into journalism. I've always assumed that this is the preferred method of entry into journalism by employers.
If you read what I put you'll see I wasn't talking about a Journalism undergraduate degree. I was talking about a postgraduate diploma after a degree in a 'traditional' subject. The postgraduate courses at the likes of City and Cardiff are established and have been established for a few decades. They're highly regarded courses in the industry. I've read loads of articles such as this:
http://education.guardian.co.uk/stud...546139,00.html so I'm aware that an undergrad degree isn't the best way into Journalism, and certainly wasn't suggesting this.

It goes without saying that you need experience on student papers/radio/tv and work experienceto get on one of the these courses.

The courses themselves are important because of the contacts you make as well as the skills. The postgraduare diploma's are very hands on with most of the time spent out looking for stories, writing them or in the studio. It's all about the experience and the contacts you make! That's why I suggested it would be hard to go 'straight in' from uni to a newspaper.

Miles -- obviously you know people who have managed to get in with the papers through student journalism, so I stand corrected in that respect. However I just wanted to clear up the confusion on the postgrad diploma - they're certainly not a 'media studies' type thing learning about the role of the media etc etc and are very much about being hands on and making contacts. You do learn about stuff like media law etc which is of course essential.
0
quote
reply
ChrisTheRockGod
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#22
Report 11 years ago
#22
ATTENTION!
if you want to be a journalist, it doesn't mean you have to take a degree course in journalism!
i want to be a journalist, and i was warned against taking a journalism degree by a number of reporters. i emailed around and asked people what they thought about it.
The general idea i got was 1. do a degree, and 2. do it in whatever field you want to. oh, and 3. get as much experience as you can!

you have to undergo NCTJ training to become a journalist AFTER uni. Yes, some courses are accredited by the NCTJ, and that's fair enough.
I spoke to the chief reporter of the Northern Echo (local paper in Teesside) who told me someone applied for a job there, who had a degree in journalism, and was TURNED AWAY because they had no formal NCTJ qualifications.

Just a word of warning...
I've done my research haha
0
quote
reply
Ell.Oh.Kay
Badges: 0
#23
Report 11 years ago
#23
I think a joint honours degree in English and Media is better to become a journalist.
0
quote
reply
cutcopy
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#24
Report Thread starter 11 years ago
#24
(Original post by Ell.Oh.Kay)
I think a joint honours degree in English and Media is better to become a journalist.
An incredibly informed and backed up post..

Seriously though, all of you people saying 'it's better not to do a journalism course to become a journalist' appear to be trying to convince yourselves you've made the right choice. Better chance of being accepted by a newspaper because you've done english over journalism? Erm.. what? Slightly skewered logic there.

It is true you don't have to do a journalism course to become a journalist (because of postgrad courses, as people have already said) but to say that doing an NCTJ approved journalism degree would hinder your chances of becoming a journalist is simply ludicrous.

And ChrisTheRockGod - anybody who undertakes a journalism degree course these days who hasn't checked to see if it's approved by the NCTJ deserves to be turned away. It's basic research to find out that you should only bother going on a journalism BA course if it's been approved, on the NCTJ site itself it tells you what courses have been approved.
0
quote
reply
tom_pinnock54
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#25
Report 11 years ago
#25
i don't know who thinks english and media are a better way into journalism than journalism, because i couldn't be arsed to read through the whole thing, but they are a fool.
0
quote
reply
TimeLady
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#26
Report 11 years ago
#26
(Original post by tom_pinnock54)
i don't know who thinks english and media are a better way into journalism than journalism, because i couldn't be arsed to read through the whole thing, is a fool.
If you want to do a degree in Journalism, just make sure it is NCTJ accredited, or be prepared to do a masters which is. Bournemouth and Portsmouth both offer them. It is that acceditation that employers look for. Whether it is from a Postgrad or undergrad doesn't matter.

Also, bare in mind if you do Undergrad Journalism you stand a good chance of having opportunities to do Work Placements. Some include them as part of the course (Like Kingston, i think), others offer them in holidays, as extras. If you do Postgrad, you wont have so many opportunities, as it will only be for 1 year, rather than 3/4. Work Experience is vital in Journalism. I plan on doing BA Journalism, with a minor field in something else, because i want the emphasis on practical experience, rather than just the theory (Which you get mainly in MA). As long as its NCTJ accredited, though, it doesn't make too much of a difference.

Plus, a Journalism BA is good for other careers anyway. Like PR, for example. Its not like it is useless if you dont do a NCTJ one, it just means you have to be a Postgrad, or not go onto Journalism directly
0
quote
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Were you ever put in isolation at school?

Yes (213)
27.92%
No (550)
72.08%

Watched Threads

View All