Irish Neo Nazis meet in Dublin Mountains Watch

dave777
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#101
Report Thread starter 12 years ago
#101
(Original post by yawn)
What has football got to do with it? :confused:
They are Celtic fans
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Howard
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#102
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#102
(Original post by naivesincerity)
Left-footer is slang for a Catholic.
Why is that exactly?
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yawn
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#103
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#103
(Original post by dave777)
They are Celtic fans
Who are?
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naivesincerity
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#104
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#104
(Original post by Howard)
Why is that exactly?
No idea. What the Irish immigrants in Liverpool used to call them, apparently.
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naivesincerity
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#105
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#105
(Original post by yawn)
Who are?
He means the Celtic=catholic, Rangers=protestant thing, in Glasgow.
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Howard
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#106
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#106
(Original post by naivesincerity)
No idea. What the Irish immigrants in Liverpool used to call them, apparently.
Yes. I've heard in many times before; just never knew how the term originated.

Just found this on another forum.....sounds crap to me....

I've read in the past that the curious expression "left footer" for a Roman Catholic derives from peat digging in Ulster, when (for unexplained reasons) Catholic diggers would traditionally use a type of spade that needed the user to press down with the left foot whereas Protestants would tend to use a design that needed pressure from the right foot. It seems quite unlikely to be honest. Why would communities living right alongside each other use a different design?
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naivesincerity
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#107
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#107
(Original post by Howard)
Yes. I've heard in many times before; just never knew how the term originated.

Just found this on another forum.....sounds crap to me....

I've read in the past that the curious expression "left footer" for a Roman Catholic derives from peat digging in Ulster, when (for unexplained reasons) Catholic diggers would traditionally use a type of spade that needed the user to press down with the left foot whereas Protestants would tend to use a design that needed pressure from the right foot. It seems quite unlikely to be honest. Why would communities living right alongside each other use a different design?
Left footers are a minority, so maybe it originated somewhere where catholics were a minority. About all I can think of.
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dave777
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#108
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#108
(Original post by yawn)
uk.altermedia.info are perniciously racist themselves so they are doing a bit of 'projecting' there.

Scroll down this link and see for yourselves what they are like.

http://uk.altermedia.info/date/2005/12/09/

cockroaches in Chinese takeaway food, cctv film susposedly showing a 'black' rapist, gay Jamaicans flooding this country, Nigerian 'sham' marriages.

Is this the sort of rubbish you believe, dave777?
Nice taking stuff out-of-context from the web blog :yy:

Latest stories are:

UK travellers get bird flu advice, Inflation fears push up ECB rate, State opening for Welsh assembly

http://uk.altermedia.info/
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yawn
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#109
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#109
(Original post by dave777)
Nice taking stuff out-of-context from the web blog :yy:

Latest stories are:

UK travellers get bird flu advice, Inflation fears push up ECB rate, State opening for Welsh assembly

http://uk.altermedia.info/
I only came across that awful site when I typed in your headlines; "Sinn Fein thugs in race hate beating" on a search engine.

The 'headline relevant' page also displayed the other items I referred to.

Nothing was taken out of context - you provided the bullet, I followed up your lead - and look where it lead us to!! :rolleyes:
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an Siarach
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#110
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#110
(Original post by Howard)
I thought scotti was the Latin name for Gaelic speaking peoples that was later applied to one particular Gaels founded state; Scotland. I don't think Scotti is the name of a tribe that originated in NI.
Yes. According the the myth of origin the Scotti originated in NI. Archeological evidence disputes this and the traditionally accepted account of immigration about the 4th-5th century.
(Original post by Dj Nastie)
well it is.

i doubt the romans called scotland scotti, because at that time it wasn't inhabited by scots, but by picts, i always thought that area was called 'albion'.
The Scots were in Northern Britain at the time of the Romans. And as for 'Albion' youre almost right. Alba or Albann was initially the Gaelic name for the Island of Britain as a whole but later came to mean simply Scotland.
(Original post by LibertineNorth)
The Scotti did travel from Ireland to Scotland originally. Before that, it was simply Picts and Britons wandering about.
As pointed out previously this was the traditionally accepted view but it doesnt seem to have any valid historical/archeological basis. It seems more likely now that the Scotti were indigenous to the West of Scotland.
Notably also the Scotti weren't the only Gaelic-speaking tribe that the Romans encountered.
Hmm. Slippery slope here. 'Scotti' was the designated term for all speakers of Gaelic although as you say there were tribes other than the Scotti themselves. Perhpas one way to think of it is the way the name of the Angles came to dominate over those of the Saxons,Jutes etc to form the basis of the overall name 'English.'
Albion is the name for Great Britain which Roman sources cite as the native's name for the place. Quite whether this is accurate or not is another matter. However I believe you may be confusing it with Albany, which is a term generally applied to the northern half of Scotland.
Its pretty safe to assume that its correct.
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an Siarach
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#111
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#111
(Original post by Dj Nastie)
yes it is ***** features. The scots descend from a tribe called the scotti who originated from NI.
(Original post by naivesincerity)
My interpretation is that a great many of today's protestants in Northen Ireland are descended from a mass influx of Scots, the catholics being indegenous Irish, or at least Irish who were there longer.
You must bear in mind that while Northern Ireland was basically a colony for Scotland and that the majority of the population planted there came from Scotland that this does not in itself mean they were of Scottish ethnicity or race. You must consider the ethnic history and make of Scotland. The majority of those moved from Scotland to Ireland were from the south, primarily the troublesome Border familes ( the Border Reivers ) who were from the only part of Scotland to have always been English. Lothian and the Borders was, after all, "the land of the English in the Kingdom of Scots" to quote a 12th century historian and most of the 'Scots' planted in Ireland originated from here and thus were quite thoroughly anglo-saxon/english and so the oft repeated claim ( generally by partisan loyalist pseudo-historians) that the protestants of Ulster are the descendants of the native Ulster Scots who (allegedly) colonised Scotland have little basis in reality.
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yawn
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#112
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#112
(Original post by an Siarach)
You must bear in mind that while Northern Ireland was basically a colony for Scotland and that the majority of the population planted there came from Scotland that this does not in itself mean they were of Scottish ethnicity or race. You must consider the ethnic history and make of Scotland. The majority of those moved from Scotland to Ireland were from the south, primarily the troublesome Border familes ( the Border Reivers ) who were from the only part of Scotland to have always been English. Lothian and the Borders was, after all, "the land of the English in the Kingdom of Scots" to quote a 12th century historian and most of the 'Scots' planted in Ireland originated from here and thus were quite thoroughly anglo-saxon/english and so the oft repeated claim ( generally by partisan loyalist pseudo-historians) that the protestants of Ulster are the descendants of the native Ulster Scots who (allegedly) colonised Scotland have little basis in reality.
Thanks for that information, an Siarach. It makes interesting reading.
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Dr Pruss
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#113
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#113
(Original post by Strikeforce!)
No harm done. Being a neo-nazi is not a crime.
Exactly.

Tolerance sometimes goes out of the window if people opt to have views that are not namby pamby liberal marxist or otherwise leftwing.

I suggest that the "Irish neo nazis" are simply expressing their human right to have a free opinion and believe in whatever they want to believe.

Article 10 of the Declaration of Human Rights upholds the right of every European to hold an opinion - irrespective of whether it is neo-nazi or old-nazi or any other shade of national socialist opinion. Good luck to them.

Isnt that what the 'lefties' mean when they trumpet 'Diversity'?.
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Agent Smith
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#114
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#114
Oh, please. Heard it all before, you're just being daft.
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Dr Pruss
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#115
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#115
(Original post by Agent Smith)
Oh, please. Heard it all before, you're just being daft.
Thanks for the rep point .

So is Free Speech only ok as long as it fits into your left-wing world view?.
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