I want to learn C++ ...

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    But what do I download? XD


    There's Visual C++, Borlander C++

    Is C++ even free? XD

    I'm really not sure where I should be looking so advice from your experiences would be greatly appreciated.

    Thank you
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    Whilst I cannot use c++, I do know that C++ is free, as it is a programming language, and therefore asking if it is free is like asking whether the Chinese language is free.

    Have a look online for tutorials, or there are plenty of books on amazon
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    You need to download a C++ compiler.
    The only free ones I know of are gcc, CLang/LLVM and Microsoft Visual C++ 2010 Express. The last one is probably your easiest way to get started if you are running Windows.

    However: Why do you want to learn C++ in particular?
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    You might be better starting off with an easier language to learn, such as C# or Java, and learn the basics behind programming techniques and methodologies.
    That would be my suggestion anyway - finding a beginners guide to Object Oriented programming in, say, Java.

    Anyway, good luck!
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    I have worked with C#/C++ for the past three years. And even I still rely on Google to tell me how to do things.

    I would recommend starting with something a tad easier, like C#. The two are "similar", in that some things carry over and the context of most things is similar. But I guess comparing the two is like comparing an orange to an apple. The two are both fruit but taste completely different.
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    (Original post by TheGrinningSkull)
    But what do I download? XD


    There's Visual C++, Borlander C++

    Is C++ even free? XD

    I'm really not sure where I should be looking so advice from your experiences would be greatly appreciated.

    Thank you
    I think the important question is 'Why?'
    Any reason you want C++ in particular? Or do you just want to learn programming in general? What is your previous experience with computers like?
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    There are two things that one needs in order to begin development in C/C++. The first is a text editor, which is used to write and edit the source code. The other is a compiler, which translates C/C++ code into an executable computer program. However, most developers use an integrated development environment which encapsulates the process of editing, compiling, building and debugging programs.

    Suitable for beginners

    Quincy 2005 is a rather old but stable C/C++ IDE. It is based around the mingw gcc compiler and is still used by some universities today to teach programming.

    Code::Blocks is a more feature-complete mingw based IDE.

    Microsoft Visual C++ Express is a free version of Microsoft's commercial compiler and IDE. However, it only implements the original (outdated) version of C, not the new C99 standard, and for that reason it is not recommended.

    XCode is Apple's IDE for Macs, iPhones and iPads. It utilises their own CLang/LVLM compiler.

    More advanced options


    Netbeans fully featured IDE with support for multiple languages and operating systems. It is, however, quick tricky to configure for C/C++ on Windows.

    Eclipse is an industry standard development environment.

    Recommendations

    These are my subjective recommendations:

    Coding on Windows
    Quincy is a good starting point for learning the basics and once you have outgrown it there is a fairly straightforward path to Code::Blocks.

    Coding on Mac
    XCode should be the default starting point. It offers a great native user interface with a good compiler and all the tools you will need.

    Netbeans and Eclipse both offer more features and plugins than the above but can be more complicated to set-up and overwhelming for newcomers.
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    (Original post by Y__)
    You need to download a C++ compiler.
    The only free ones I know of are gcc, CLang/LLVM and Microsoft Visual C++ 2010 Express. The last one is probably your easiest way to get started if you are running Windows.

    However: Why do you want to learn C++ in particular?
    (Original post by HazzaBui)
    You might be better starting off with an easier language to learn, such as C# or Java, and learn the basics behind programming techniques and methodologies.
    That would be my suggestion anyway - finding a beginners guide to Object Oriented programming in, say, Java.

    Anyway, good luck!
    (Original post by Chrosson)
    I think the important question is 'Why?'
    Any reason you want C++ in particular? Or do you just want to learn programming in general? What is your previous experience with computers like?
    Thanks, I have experience with BBC Basic, using that for A level coursework and I thought I may as well move on to other things that may have more applications. I'm starting an engineering course come September and I thought learning C++ might be useful, even then, just for fun because it is object orientated
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    (Original post by BigLampshade)
    I have worked with C#/C++ for the past three years. And even I still rely on Google to tell me how to do things.

    I would recommend starting with something a tad easier, like C#. The two are "similar", in that some things carry over and the context of most things is similar. But I guess comparing the two is like comparing an orange to an apple. The two are both fruit but taste completely different.
    (Original post by maturestudy)
    There are two things that one needs in order to begin development in C/C++. The first is a text editor, which is used to write and edit the source code. The other is a compiler, which translates C/C++ code into an executable computer program. However, most developers use an integrated development environment which encapsulates the process of editing, compiling, building and debugging programs.

    Suitable for beginners

    Quincy 2005 is a rather old but stable C/C++ IDE. It is based around the mingw gcc compiler and is still used by some universities today to teach programming.

    Code::Blocks is a more feature-complete mingw based IDE.

    Microsoft Visual C++ Express is a free version of Microsoft's commercial compiler and IDE. However, it only implements the original (outdated) version of C, not the new C99 standard, and for that reason it is not recommended.

    XCode is Apple's IDE for Macs, iPhones and iPads. It utilises their own CLang/LVLM compiler.

    More advanced options


    Netbeans fully featured IDE with support for multiple languages and operating systems. It is, however, quick tricky to configure for C/C++ on Windows.

    Eclipse is an industry standard development environment.

    Recommendations

    These are my subjective recommendations:

    Coding on Windows
    Quincy is a good starting point for learning the basics and once you have outgrown it there is a fairly straightforward path to Code::Blocks.

    Coding on Mac
    XCode should be the default starting point. It offers a great native user interface with a good compiler and all the tools you will need.

    Netbeans and Eclipse both offer more features and plugins than the above but can be more complicated to set-up and overwhelming for newcomers.
    Thank you both very much for the advice and detailed answer. I'll go with your recommendation and start off with code::blocks and see where I go from there, thanks
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    Download an IDE. I'd recommend Eclipse
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    Code::Blocks is amazing.
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    I'd recommend the book Accelerated C++ if you have already had some experience with programming
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    And when you find a good compiler, you should grind through the basic tutorials at cplusplus.com
 
 
 
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