Turn on thread page Beta

TSR Hindu Society watch

Announcements
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    These videos are so amazing! Watch this instead of some crappy tv show for 30 minutes, you will learn so much!
    http://www.gitaclass.org/Chapter_1.html
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    http://www.islamawareness.net/Asia/I..._in_india.html

    So I decided to read this for a laugh, the start anyway.

    Lost for words lol. Is it just made up on the spot?
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    (Original post by Ggmu!)
    http://www.islamawareness.net/Asia/I..._in_india.html

    So I decided to read this for a laugh, the start anyway.

    Lost for words lol. Is it just made up on the spot?
    This guy is a nutter. Obvious muslim brainwashing and propaganda at its best.

    How dare they say before Muslim rulers Hindus had no history. What they fail to realise that events like Mahabharat happened hundreds of years before their so called Mohammed was born. really infuriates me reading all this b***s***
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    On another topic, some radical sikhs are complaining that their corrupt gurudwaras are allowing mixed faith marriages to perform Anand Karaj( obviously hinting at the hindus). Their point is that the ceremony can only be done by a couple who are both sikh. Fair enough if that is the case but obv they do not realise the practical issues here. For example if the girl is sikh although she would partake in the hindu ceremony, she would request an Anand Karaj in the gurudwara as well to keep her side of the family happy. Now how is that the boy's fault. just because his other half his requesting him he is doing this ceremony.

    Tbh it is only hindus who will respect the gurudwara and bow down to the Granth sahib even though it is not our religion because we have been taught to respect every religion. Im pretty sure a muslim or a christian will not to the same thing. So instead of them getting agitated that a person of the hindu faith is bowing down but is not a sikh at the same time. What about regular punjabi devotees who arent sikh, do they have to convert every time they pay respects at gurudwaras coz theyre not sikh? :confused:
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sachinisgod)
    On another topic, some radical sikhs are complaining that their corrupt gurudwaras are allowing mixed faith marriages to perform Anand Karaj( obviously hinting at the hindus). Their point is that the ceremony can only be done by a couple who are both sikh. Fair enough if that is the case but obv they do not realise the practical issues here. For example if the girl is sikh although she would partake in the hindu ceremony, she would request an Anand Karaj in the gurudwara as well to keep her side of the family happy. Now how is that the boy's fault. just because his other half his requesting him he is doing this ceremony.

    Tbh it is only hindus who will respect the gurudwara and bow down to the Granth sahib even though it is not our religion because we have been taught to respect every religion. Im pretty sure a muslim or a christian will not to the same thing. So instead of them getting agitated that a person of the hindu faith is bowing down but is not a sikh at the same time. What about regular punjabi devotees who arent sikh, do they have to convert every time they pay respects at gurudwaras coz theyre not sikh? :confused:
    99% of the time it's Hindus who respect and partake in other religious processes. But it's hardly reciprocated.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ggmu!)
    99% of the time it's Hindus who respect and partake in other religious processes. But it's hardly reciprocated.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    With christianity and islam converting most people, how long before hinduism becomes so small that very few people believe in it?
    Is this when Krishna will come?
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    (Original post by Ggmu!)
    99% of the time it's Hindus who respect and partake in other religious processes. But it's hardly reciprocated.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    it never is cause we are seen as the weak ones.

    (Original post by Guren)
    With christianity and islam converting most people, how long before hinduism becomes so small that very few people believe in it?
    Is this when Krishna will come?
    It is the kalyug. Undharmic things are happening. But we have stood firm over the centuries despite invasions and conversions. I think we wont go away that easy lol
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Guren)
    With christianity and islam converting most people, how long before hinduism becomes so small that very few people believe in it?
    Is this when Krishna will come?
    Never.

    Hindus are NOT weak. There is a reason why Muslim armies destroyed the culture and replaced it with the Arab culture in many places, but it failed in India. Christian missionaries have made little gains and generally bribe people into Christianity.

    There will always be a Shivaji or Maharana Pratap to defend our honour.

    (Original post by sachinisgod)
    it never is cause we are seen as the weak ones.


    It is the kalyug. Undharmic things are happening. But we have stood firm over the centuries despite invasions and conversions. I think we wont go away that easy lol
    We're passive and respectful. Not aggressive and 'tolerant'.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    http://www.hinduhumanrights.info/the...son-encounter/

    Interesting read. Brings a tear to my eye at how simple people can be, and how simple they think life can be.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Shruti21)
    Read few posts, saying a Hindu can eat beef.."cow is worshipped as god" I guess this is known by every single person born in a Hindu family..Use your brain and your heart if you have one, how can you eat something which you worship?? There should be no second thoughts.. You dont have tto read all the religious books to prove your point whether beef should be eaten or not...And on a humanitarian ground, like we humans even animals have every single right to live. Don't take away their rights just because you are on dominating side... :\
    One of the greatest reformers of Hinduism in recent times Swami Vivekananda said that when something within you tells you that you don't want to eat meat then you are truly ready to give up meat, but don't force it upon yourself or others.

    This Hindu religion says that it is not what you eat, but the way you lead your life which truly shows whether you are religious or not. Do not reduce religion purely down to your diet.

    Therefore my advice is become a better human and don't reduce the religion and your religious beliefs down to the menu in your kitchen

    some of my family are vegetarians and some aren't. Not all Hindus are vegetarians.

    The rationale about not killing the animal doesn't really make any sense to me. You are still eating the result of killing.

    why would"god" allow humans to make so many different religions, if one religion says its a sin to eat pork or beef does that mean everyone else who does not believe that religion are going to have a punished after life,I don' think....

    I'm Hindu and most of my family eat beef,same with the Hindus in Mauritius/Sri Lanka/Singapore etc... all of them eat beef!

    I don't do drugs/alcohol or pre marital sex but I eat beef I do not see the cow as my mother.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    It's incredible how embarrassing it is when a Hindu wants to post about their religion on here. It's like they took the Church class on Hinduism.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    Hey everyone, I'm just wondering what it is that Hindus actually believe? As with all religions I've heard all kinds of things and when trying to find out the beliefs of Hinduism online it all seems rather confusing. I heard that Hinduism is like an umbrella term for loads of different belief systems too. Would anyone be able to clarify for me - just out of pure interest - what Hindus actually believe in? Thanks in advance for any replies
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    (Original post by cjmro)
    Hey everyone, I'm just wondering what it is that Hindus actually believe? As with all religions I've heard all kinds of things and when trying to find out the beliefs of Hinduism online it all seems rather confusing. I heard that Hinduism is like an umbrella term for loads of different belief systems too. Would anyone be able to clarify for me - just out of pure interest - what Hindus actually believe in? Thanks in advance for any replies
    Hi, thats realy good that you are curious

    However you need to be a bit specific as to what aspect's beliefs you want to know.

    Generally the view that we are a polytheistic religion which is millions of Gods is incorrect. We have ONE God but he has numerous forms each representing a certain aspect in life.Also the worship of statues/murtis is not required, we merely use it to channel our devotion in the direction of God but one can pray to God without having these statues.

    We believe in karma and reincarnation(which is linked) Good deeds will make you achieve moksha (salvation) and that is the good karma but bad deeds will lead you being reincarnated as undesirable things for a few lives to remind you of your sins. We also believe in non violence and vegetarianism is linked to that.

    Also the caste system is not a religious aspect but a cultural one as a man wrote down these rules. Its because of the backward mentality in India that this practice is continuing to happen but in reality its the most abhorrent practice.

    In reality you can say it is not a religion, more like a way of life. There are no RULES and every individual is free to do what they like, obv these are there to make sure you lead your life as a good person but its all down to personal choice. We have no conversions or apostasy issues, You are free to marry who you want and pray how you want

    Hope that helped
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sachinisgod)
    Hi, thats realy good that you are curious

    However you need to be a bit specific as to what aspect's beliefs you want to know.

    Generally the view that we are a polytheistic religion which is millions of Gods is incorrect. We have ONE God but he has numerous forms each representing a certain aspect in life.Also the worship of statues/murtis is not required, we merely use it to channel our devotion in the direction of God but one can pray to God without having these statues.

    We believe in karma and reincarnation(which is linked) Good deeds will make you achieve moksha (salvation) and that is the good karma but bad deeds will lead you being reincarnated as undesirable things for a few lives to remind you of your sins. We also believe in non violence and vegetarianism is linked to that.

    Also the caste system is not a religious aspect but a cultural one as a man wrote down these rules. Its because of the backward mentality in India that this practice is continuing to happen but in reality its the most abhorrent practice.

    In reality you can say it is not a religion, more like a way of life. There are no RULES and every individual is free to do what they like, obv these are there to make sure you lead your life as a good person but its all down to personal choice. We have no conversions or apostasy issues, You are free to marry who you want and pray how you want

    Hope that helped
    Wowww thank you! That was so informative! I like how you described it as a way of life rather than a religion and how there seems to be a lot of freedom in terms of to what extent you follow the teachings - quite different from the impression I get from other religions. Interesting stuff. Would you say the idea of moksha is similar to that of heaven in other religions or do you mean salvation in a different sense?

    Also, may anyone follow Hinduism regardless of their colour? And what is the holy book of this way of life?

    Thanks so much!! So interesting. And thanks too for clearing up misconceptions! Very beneficial
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by cjmro)

    Also, may anyone follow Hinduism regardless of their colour? And what is the holy book of this way of life?
    Of course! Like all other religions it is just a belief system and not tied to any race. I might be wrong but I think Steve Jobs embraced Hinduism.

    We don't really have one holy book although there are a few well known texts such as the Bhagavad-Gita. I suppose if you had to pick one set it would be the Vedas which are used as a sort of guide to daily life.



    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by cjmro)
    Wowww thank you! That was so informative! I like how you described it as a way of life rather than a religion and how there seems to be a lot of freedom in terms of to what extent you follow the teachings - quite different from the impression I get from other religions. Interesting stuff. Would you say the idea of moksha is similar to that of heaven in other religions or do you mean salvation in a different sense?

    Also, may anyone follow Hinduism regardless of their colour? And what is the holy book of this way of life?

    Thanks so much!! So interesting. And thanks too for clearing up misconceptions! Very beneficial
    In my opinion, Moksha and Heaven are different. The idea of Moksha itself is so abstract that we can't really compare it to something. My idea of Moksha isn't like heaven where you inhabit your body and almost 'live'. As Hindus mostly believe you are the soul and not the body, your soul will be reunited with the highest reality/God/Supersoul/your personal deity. But as beyond that, I personally I can't say anyone has a concrete belief.

    Hinduism is devoid of colour or race/etc. The fundamental reality is that we all have a soul. Nobody has a more 'capable' soul than you. We are all equal when it comes to it. Circumstances of birth and opportunity, in my opinion, aren't a part of any divine plan. If one wishes to believe, it is simply karma working.

    We don't have one holy book. The book which most Hindus go to today is the Bhagavad Gita. In my opinion it's the most sophisticated and eternal 'religious' scripture produced by mankind. Classically the highest scripture are the Vedas which consist of four individual Ved's. Their origins may go back thousands of years. The Upanishads were scriptures written slightly later with a more philosophical context, these are also full of invaluable knowledge.

    The two famous epics, the Ramayan and Mahabharata have been the most famous stories of India about two God's, Ram and Krishna, respectively. I highly, highly suggest you read them too, you'd find them enjoyable to read above all.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    (Original post by cjmro)
    Wowww thank you! That was so informative! I like how you described it as a way of life rather than a religion and how there seems to be a lot of freedom in terms of to what extent you follow the teachings - quite different from the impression I get from other religions. Interesting stuff. Would you say the idea of moksha is similar to that of heaven in other religions or do you mean salvation in a different sense?

    Also, may anyone follow Hinduism regardless of their colour? And what is the holy book of this way of life?

    Thanks so much!! So interesting. And thanks too for clearing up misconceptions! Very beneficial
    Yes you can say Mokhsa is basically attainment of Swarg i.e Heaven. The result of good karma as you can say.

    Yes ofcourse, there are no restrictions on who can practice the hindu dharma. There is a temple in Wales called Skanda Vale which are run entirely by white priests who are much more strict and devout and simple compared to normal asian hindus. As i had said before because there is no concept of conversion, a person cannot simply become a hindu just like that. for example if you convert to Islam then youre a muslim. However it is slightly different in Hinduism in that your dad has to be a Hindu for you to be Hindu by birth. however if someone choses to lead the life and practice the hindu dharma then yes they can call themselves hindu but not in the strictest sense ( that does not mean that their devotion will be any less if I may add)

    Yes there a few like the Vedas, Upnishads and epics like Mahabharat and Ramayan plus the Bhagwad Gita. All these books give a simple message on how to lead life as a good human being.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SleepingStag)
    Of course! Like all other religions it is just a belief system and not tied to any race. I might be wrong but I think Steve Jobs embraced Hinduism.

    We don't really have one holy book although there are a few well known texts such as the Bhagavad-Gita. I suppose if you had to pick one set it would be the Vedas which are used as a sort of guide to daily life.



    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Thank you! I will definitely look into these. & Yes I'm sure Julia Roberts and I think Russell Brand also follow the path too really interesting
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ggmu!)
    In my opinion, Moksha and Heaven are different. The idea of Moksha itself is so abstract that we can't really compare it to something. My idea of Moksha isn't like heaven where you inhabit your body and almost 'live'. As Hindus mostly believe you are the soul and not the body, your soul will be reunited with the highest reality/God/Supersoul/your personal deity. But as beyond that, I personally I can't say anyone has a concrete belief.

    Hinduism is devoid of colour or race/etc. The fundamental reality is that we all have a soul. Nobody has a more 'capable' soul than you. We are all equal when it comes to it. Circumstances of birth and opportunity, in my opinion, aren't a part of any divine plan. If one wishes to believe, it is simply karma working.

    We don't have one holy book. The book which most Hindus go to today is the Bhagavad Gita. In my opinion it's the most sophisticated and eternal 'religious' scripture produced by mankind. Classically the highest scripture are the Vedas which consist of four individual Ved's. Their origins may go back thousands of years. The Upanishads were scriptures written slightly later with a more philosophical context, these are also full of invaluable knowledge.

    The two famous epics, the Ramayan and Mahabharata have been the most famous stories of India about two God's, Ram and Krishna, respectively. I highly, highly suggest you read them too, you'd find them enjoyable to read above all.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Thank you for such a detailed answer! How does the belief in reincarnation work? Is it if you build up more good karma than bad karma then you break the cycle of rebirth and that is when you will be reunited with God? Is there a concept of hell in Hinduism or is the kind of 'punishment' the bad karma we must face either in this life or the ones to come?

    Also, what parts do yoga and meditation play in the Hindu belief?

    Sorry for so many questions I'm just really curious haha

    Thanks for your help!
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sachinisgod)
    Yes you can say Mokhsa is basically attainment of Swarg i.e Heaven. The result of good karma as you can say.

    Yes ofcourse, there are no restrictions on who can practice the hindu dharma. There is a temple in Wales called Skanda Vale which are run entirely by white priests who are much more strict and devout and simple compared to normal asian hindus. As i had said before because there is no concept of conversion, a person cannot simply become a hindu just like that. for example if you convert to Islam then youre a muslim. However it is slightly different in Hinduism in that your dad has to be a Hindu for you to be Hindu by birth. however if someone choses to lead the life and practice the hindu dharma then yes they can call themselves hindu but not in the strictest sense ( that does not mean that their devotion will be any less if I may add)

    Yes there a few like the Vedas, Upnishads and epics like Mahabharat and Ramayan plus the Bhagwad Gita. All these books give a simple message on how to lead life as a good human being.
    Interesting stuff! I know so much more about Hinduism already when I knew literally nothing yesterday, thanks for your contribution! There are so many interesting concepts. I've read online that Hinduism comprises of branches including Shaivism, Vaishnavism and Shaktism and I've also heard of Hare Krishna - are these traditions similar to how in Christianity there are denominations like Church of England, Roman Catholic, Adventist etc? Do they differ much?
 
 
 
Poll
Brexit: Given the chance now, would you vote leave or remain?
Useful resources

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.