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nucdev
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#1381
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#1381
(Original post by SunDun111)
What Hindu Books have you read? have you read the Gita if so do you recommend reading it?
Yup, read the Gita and the Mukhya Upanishads (the 10 major Upanishads).

Yeah I would definitely recommend reading them, but make sure you get a good translation - I personally suggest getting the ones translated by Eknath Easwaran.
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moment of truth
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#1382
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#1382
(Original post by nucdev)
Thanks


That last bit of what you said is so true though, and was summed up well by Swami Vivekananda in this powerful quote; “Was there ever a more horrible blasphemy than the statement that all the knowledge of God is confined to this or that book?
How dare men call God infinite, and yet try to compress Him within the covers of a little book!"


and to add to that;
"Idols, or temples or churches or books are only the supports, the helps, of his [or her] spiritual childhood; but on and on he [or she] must progress."

This to me is important, it recognizes that the Absolute (or Brahman) cannot be limited to a particular religious book or a particular religion, and whilst they can be like guides pointing you in that direction, the ultimate person with authority and responsibility over making the journey of Self-realization is You yourself.


And I think that this is why we have sooooooo many books - our ancient saints and sages recognized that even the most voluminous book cannot hope to capture even 1% of the Absolute.
Never really thought about it like that, but it is true. If God is said to be infinite, then He shouldn't be confined to just a particular book.

A couple of years ago, I wanted to go to India on a spiritual journey to help me discover myself, but sadly I don't think I will be doing that for a while yet talking to a sage/swami can be so beneficial and you can learn so much from them, it's incredible.
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nucdev
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#1383
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#1383
(Original post by TheTruthTeller)
Hi guys, just wondering is it true you cannot convert into Hinduism?
Gonna sound more like a Facebook relationship status - "it's complicated" :laugh:

Apart from the Hare Krishna and Arya Samaj branches, Hinduism generally doesn't have the concept of proselytism or conversion so the question is a bit of a wrong 'un in the first place!

At the same time, there are also some Hindu communities (mostly in India) that would consider Hinduism to be intertwined with race and culture, so someone not born into it would not be considered to be a "proper" Hindu.

In western nations though, Hindus as a whole are generally more willing to accept "converts".

I doubt you would ever get a satisfactory reply to this question since there isn't a single answer and much of it depends on the sect/branch one wishes to subscribe to.

So yeah.............. it's complicated!
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TheTruthTeller
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#1384
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#1384
(Original post by nucdev)
Gonna sound more like a Facebook relationship status - "it's complicated" :laugh:

Apart from the Hare Krishna and Arya Samaj branches, Hinduism generally doesn't have the concept of proselytism or conversion so the question is a bit of a wrong 'un in the first place!

At the same time, there are also some Hindu communities (mostly in India) that would consider Hinduism to be intertwined with race and culture, so someone not born into it would not be considered to be a "proper" Hindu.

In western nations though, Hindus as a whole are generally more willing to accept "converts".

I doubt you would ever get a satisfactory reply to this question since there isn't a single answer and much of it depends on the sect/branch one wishes to subscribe to.

So yeah.............. it's complicated!
Really interesting. I would have never thought this.
Is there any Hindu scripture you could referrence to back up the conversion/ ethnoreligious aspect?
Also what about if you marry a non-hindu and you have a child- would the child be considered hindu if they indentified as it?
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nucdev
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#1385
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#1385
(Original post by moment of truth)
Never really thought about it like that, but it is true. If God is said to be infinite, then He shouldn't be confined to just a particular book.

A couple of years ago, I wanted to go to India on a spiritual journey to help me discover myself, but sadly I don't think I will be doing that for a while yet talking to a sage/swami can be so beneficial and you can learn so much from them, it's incredible.
Yup I definitely agree with that. *Most* branches of Hinduism aren't as simple as "believe in this and be saved", but it's a journey to be made by an individual towards self-realization where the books and the gurus/sages/swamis are but guides and pointers.

If you aren't able to actually talk to a living guru, sage or swami, the next best thing would be to read the stuff that they have written or even read the stuff that someone who is no longer alive has left behind.

I personally got my inspiration from the Complete Works of Swami Vivekananda - someone who literally revived Hinduism from a near certain death.

There's also another individual called Ramana Maharshi who was a little more recent - though I personally haven't read his stuff.

But beware though, because we're an incredibly open system without any central authority, lots of fraudsters also jump on the bandwagon!
For every genuine individual, you get hundreds of conmen (and women) - the only way to sift through who is genuine and who is a trickster is your yukti (reason) and viveka (judgement).
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nucdev
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#1386
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#1386
(Original post by TheTruthTeller)
Really interesting. I would have never thought this.
Is there any Hindu scripture you could referrence to back up the conversion/ ethnoreligious aspect?
Also what about if you marry a non-hindu and you have a child- would the child be considered hindu if they indentified as it?
That's the thing though - I don't think there is a scripture that would back up any assertion that being a Hindu depends on birth/race - especially since the word "Hindu" doesn't appear in our scriptures!

It's a bit of a contradiction, since the name given in the scriptures is "Sanatana Dharma" - "The Eternal Dharma" which cannot be eternal if its practice is limited by descent/ethnicity.

The reason we by-and-large don't seek converts is because we see other paths, religions and philosophies as leading to the same Absolute - just as the water in different streams comes together in one global ocean.
In that sense Hinduism is very pluralist in its outlook.

Part of the complication is the fact that in the medieval period, the word 'Hindu' was a geographical term given by the then Persians to refer to anybody who lived beyond the river Indus, regardless of religion.
Essentially, anyone who lived in that area would have been termed as Hindu and their land was called Hindustan (land of the Hindus). Mostly where the ethnic/descent definition for 'Hindu' comes in.

Then it evolved to mean anyone who practiced a religion native to India until, under British rule the definition was modified further - so anyone who practiced a religion native to India apart from Buddhism, Jainism and Sikhism, was called a Hindu.


Regarding the child, it really depends on the sect - some branches would say that anyone who identified with Hinduism and practiced its teachings could be a Hindu. Other branches would say it depends on the mother and yet other branches depend on the father :facepalm2:
Welcome to total confusion - but also freedom to choose what viewpoint you want to subscribe to! :lol:
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SunDun111
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#1387
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#1387
(Original post by nucdev)
Yup, read the Gita and the Mukhya Upanishads (the 10 major Upanishads).

Yeah I would definitely recommend reading them, but make sure you get a good translation - I personally suggest getting the ones translated by Eknath Easwaran.
I am tempted to read the Gita, I have been told how it has changed lives, also what do you believe about the avatar Kalki, Muslims have told me he is muhammed (as a plea to convert me I guess) and Sikhs have told me it is Guru Nanak. What do you believe about it?
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nucdev
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#1388
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#1388
(Original post by SunDun111)
I am tempted to read the Gita, I have been told how it has changed lives, also what do you believe about the avatar Kalki, Muslims have told me he is muhammed (as a plea to convert me I guess) and Sikhs have told me it is Guru Nanak. What do you believe about it?
You should read it definitely - I wouldn't go as far as to say it changed my life completely, but it certainly gave me a fresh perspective on life, if that makes sense.

It is perhaps one of the Hindu philosophical texts that is the most accessible to the average person, compared to say, the Upanishads, for which you may need a Guru to help you out or have some background in the philosophy.


Actually I have a good chuckle when people try and say that - on the one hand they (Muslims mostly) criticize Hinduism as some silly, heathen, pagan religion and yet it's like they're trying to get some validation for their prophet from Hindu scripture at the same time.

Tbh I've never heard Sikhs claiming that Kalki is supposed to be Guru Nanak - as far as I understand their Dasam Granth prophesizes Kalki to come much later.

If people accept the concept of Kalki avatar, then they also need to accept one other important thing - he's due to come at the end of Kalyug which is like 427,000 years away. This means it cannot be referring to any prophet of the past or the present.

And in any case, Kalki avatara is mostly a prophesy that comes from the Puranas which are NOT scriptures of authority.

On the whole I take them to be allegorical stories that are meant to convey deeper philosophies and ideas - remembering that the word Purana in Sanskrit translates to "make-up" or "mythology".
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moment of truth
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#1389
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#1389
(Original post by nucdev)
Yup I definitely agree with that. *Most* branches of Hinduism aren't as simple as "believe in this and be saved", but it's a journey to be made by an individual towards self-realization where the books and the gurus/sages/swamis are but guides and pointers.

If you aren't able to actually talk to a living guru, sage or swami, the next best thing would be to read the stuff that they have written or even read the stuff that someone who is no longer alive has left behind.

I personally got my inspiration from the Complete Works of Swami Vivekananda - someone who literally revived Hinduism from a near certain death.

There's also another individual called Ramana Maharshi who was a little more recent - though I personally haven't read his stuff.

But beware though, because we're an incredibly open system without any central authority, lots of fraudsters also jump on the bandwagon!
For every genuine individual, you get hundreds of conmen (and women) - the only way to sift through who is genuine and who is a trickster is your yukti (reason) and viveka (judgement).
Sorry about all the irregular replies

I think that is such a strong thing about Hinduism, the fact that it is all about your own spiritual journey and path.

I have read one book by an ISKCON swami. It is the autobiography by Radhanath Swami called 'My Journey Home' which illustrates his story from coming from a Jewish American family to travelling to India and finding Krishna in his spiritual journey. It is a fantastic book, which kept me entailed completely.

I have heard of both the swamis that you mentioned but haven't looked deeper into them. I can tell that you really admire Swami Vivekananda cause you use his quotes a lot. :lol:

That is very very true. Probably more so in India, though.
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nucdev
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#1390
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#1390
(Original post by moment of truth)
Sorry about all the irregular replies

I think that is such a strong thing about Hinduism, the fact that it is all about your own spiritual journey and path.

I have read one book by an ISKCON swami. It is the autobiography by Radhanath Swami called 'My Journey Home' which illustrates his story from coming from a Jewish American family to travelling to India and finding Krishna in his spiritual journey. It is a fantastic book, which kept me entailed completely.

I have heard of both the swamis that you mentioned but haven't looked deeper into them. I can tell that you really admire Swami Vivekananda cause you use his quotes a lot. :lol:

That is very very true. Probably more so in India, though.
Aah don't worry about it.

I agree - the more centralised a religion becomes, the more I think it stifles freedom of thought. Doesn't mean it doesn't happen amongst a minority of Hindu sects, but overall, freedom of approach is fundamental to Hinduism.

After all where else will you find a religion that incorporates atheism, agnosticism, deism, monotheism, pantheism, panentheism, dualism, qualified monism, pure monism and much more.
And that's just in its orthodox (astika) philosophies!

I've heard of that guy actually - I think his story is indicative of a growing trend in the West where people are now looking eastwards and taking the philosophies from the East a bit more seriously.
An example is the way Buddhism is gaining a lot of acceptance in the West as well as Dharmic concepts such as Yoga.

Yeah, Vivekananda is definitely my inspiration - he explains things with such clarity that it makes me feel as though I wish I had started reading his works much earlier!

I would definitely say he had a big part to play in bringing me back to Hinduism - and what's unique about him was that he didn't say anything like "come sit at my feet and I'll sort you out", but it was more "I've sorted myself out and now you do the same, I am merely your guide" - again going back to this freedom of approach angle.
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nucdev
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#1391
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#1391
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kandykissesxox
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#1392
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#1392
I feel better when I'm here.


Ok nucdev anyway

The last volt is said to contain enough gold to pay up to half of India's debt. http://www.amazingbharat.com/2014/02...r-of-shri.html
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nucdev
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#1393
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#1393
(Original post by kandykissesxox)
I feel better when I'm here.
:confused:
You feel better on this thread?


Ok nucdev anyway

The last volt is said to contain enough gold to pay up to half of India's debt. http://www.amazingbharat.com/2014/02...r-of-shri.html
Woah very interesting - haven't ever been to South India, so this place and Tirupati Balaji are two places I'd like to visit.
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kandykissesxox
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#1394
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#1394
(Original post by nucdev)
:confused:
You feel better on this thread?




Woah very interesting - haven't ever been to South India, so this place and Tirupati Balaji are two places I'd like to visit.
Yeah because this way we're not derailing threads and stuff

I didn't even know the bit about the cobras and how some people think that there are rivers waiting to flood India. Or the fact that when the vault is not successfully opened it could lead to a very dangerous supernatural outcome.
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.Iqra.
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#1395
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#1395
why do hindus put a red dot on their forehead
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nucdev
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#1396
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#1396
(Original post by kandykissesxox)
Yeah because this way we're not derailing threads and stuff

I didn't even know the bit about the cobras and how some people think that there are rivers waiting to flood India. Or the fact that when the vault is not successfully opened it could lead to a very dangerous supernatural outcome.
Yeah well you can blame me for that Lol - I end up derailing too many threads or at least contributing to their derailment.


Yeah Lol, it does seem quite out there, but the reason for the superstitions is just so people don't open it up and steal stuff (I assume).
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kandykissesxox
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#1397
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#1397
(Original post by nucdev)
Yeah well you can blame me for that Lol - I end up derailing too many threads or at least contributing to their derailment.


Yeah Lol, it does seem quite out there, but the reason for the superstitions is just so people don't open it up and steal stuff (I assume).
True. The indian authorities are basically keeping it on the low.
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nucdev
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#1398
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#1398
(Original post by iqra2159)
why do hindus put a red dot on their forehead
Females put a red round one to signify that they're married, but that's more of a cultural item rather than religious. Even girls who are not married sometimes wear a 'tika' on their foreheads when they dress up in Indian clothes.

But there are a lot of different symbols and styles that individuals put on their foreheads - symbolizing what sect they belong to and these are worn by both men and women.

The reason for marking the forehead is to show that they belong to this religion and also the belief that the region between the eyebrows is very special. If we are successful in meditating, then that part of our front of the brain seems to become very active.
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kandykissesxox
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#1399
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#1399
(Original post by nucdev)
Females put a red round one to signify that they're married, but that's more of a cultural item rather than religious. Even girls who are not married sometimes wear a 'tika' on their foreheads when they dress up in Indian clothes.

But there are a lot of different symbols and styles that individuals put on their foreheads - symbolizing what sect they belong to and these are worn by both men and women.

The reason for marking the forehead is to show that they belong to this religion and also the belief that the region between the eyebrows is very special. If we are successful in meditating, then that part of our front of the brain seems to become very active.
Also when white girls prance around with a bindi on their foreheads as a fashion statement is some next level offence imo.
Spoiler:
Show
I call bindi=changlo
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nucdev
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#1400
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#1400
(Original post by kandykissesxox)
Also when white girls prance around with a bindi on their foreheads as a fashion statement is some next level offence imo.

I call bindi=changlo
Is this your typical Surti mispronounciation? - it's Chandlo Lol


Really?

You will hate this place then :rofl::
(Ngl I really wanna go here for Holi)

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