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moment of truth
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#1621
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#1621
(Original post by nucdev)
It's a Mystery



Aaah well, you could just read the translations I guess.
I used to keep getting these e-mails from SHYAM (Satkarma Humanitarian Youth Awakening Mission) about Bhagavad Gita classes and they used to have some videos uploaded on to YouTube - you could try them.
I guess lol.

Yeah, possibly. I struggle to sit through it if I don't find the presenter engaging enough, though. :lol: That's something that the swamis are amazing at. The amount of talks I have sat through and not been bored because of their style of talking and presenting is mad!
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SunDun111
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#1622
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#1622
(Original post by Hirsty97)
I'm White and non-Hindu so I'm not sure if I'm welcome,but either way I find Hinduism a fascinating religion, but I know comparatively little compared to what I know about Christianity & Islam, and am always interested in learning more.

My understanding so far it that it is less of an organised religion as such, like the Abrahamic faiths, but more of a synthesis of lots of Indian philosophies, with lots of influence from the tales in the Mahabharata and Ramayna
It is not an organised religion, you could say its a religion of religions but the vast majority of Hindu's believe in certain aspects. One of these is reincarnation of the soul after the death. The Goal of life is to attain moksha (basically heaven but a lot different to Islam and Christianity). The way this is done is through feeling the bliss of God.

Hinduism generally actually only worship one god but in many different forms e.g. through statues. If you have any questions let us know
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nucdev
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#1623
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#1623
(Original post by Hirsty97)
I'm White and non-Hindu so I'm not sure if I'm welcome,but either way I find Hinduism a fascinating religion, but I know comparatively little compared to what I know about Christianity & Islam, and am always interested in learning more.

My understanding so far it that it is less of an organised religion as such, like the Abrahamic faiths, but more of a synthesis of lots of Indian philosophies, with lots of influence from the tales in the Mahabharata and Ramayna
Of course you're welcome Lol

But yeah - it's not organized in the Abrahamic sense like with one book, one primary prophet, a set of doctrines that all sects agree on with some variation etc.
I would say a term that could describe Hinduism is that it's a pluralistic tradition - it has a tremendous variety of different philosophies (ranging from atheism to monotheism) and practices (from someone religiously going to the temple every day to not bothering at all). As such, there is a tremendous amount of freedom for you to take your own spiritual pathway as long as it doesn't infringe on another's right to do the same.

(Original post by SunDun111)
It is not an organised religion, you could say its a religion of religions but the vast majority of Hindu's believe in certain aspects. One of these is reincarnation of the soul after the death. The Goal of life is to attain moksha (basically heaven but a lot different to Islam and Christianity). The way this is done is through feeling the bliss of God.


Hinduism generally actually only worship one god but in many different forms e.g. through statues. If you have any questions let us know
Hate to do it lol, but just some exceptions (since we can't always generalize when it comes to Hindu beliefs):

Moksha is not really heaven. Yes, there's a temporary one between lives, but Moksha is different to that - it's liberation from the cycle of life and death and is described as being Sat-Chit-Ananda = "Existence-Conciousness-Bliss".
Not all sects and philosophies would agree that Moksha is attained through feeling the bliss of God - particularly the atheist branches.

The worship of one God would be true mostly in Vedanta philosophy, but as I say, there are atheist branches too.
And Arya Samaj, though strictly monotheist, wouldn't even use murtis (statues) - they mostly worship through Havans/Homas (fire ceremonies)
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SunDun111
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#1624
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#1624
(Original post by nucdev)
Of course you're welcome Lol

But yeah - it's not organized in the Abrahamic sense like with one book, one primary prophet, a set of doctrines that all sects agree on with some variation etc.
I would say a term that could describe Hinduism is that it's a pluralistic tradition - it has a tremendous variety of different philosophies (ranging from atheism to monotheism) and practices (from someone religiously going to the temple every day to not bothering at all). As such, there is a tremendous amount of freedom for you to take your own spiritual pathway as long as it doesn't infringe on another's right to do the same.



Hate to do it lol, but just some exceptions (since we can't always generalize when it comes to Hindu beliefs):

Moksha is not really heaven. Yes, there's a temporary one between lives, but Moksha is different to that - it's liberation from the cycle of life and death and is described as being Sat-Chit-Ananda = "Existence-Conciousness-Bliss".
Not all sects and philosophies would agree that Moksha is attained through feeling the bliss of God - particularly the atheist branches.

The worship of one God would be true mostly in Vedanta philosophy, but as I say, there are atheist branches too.
And Arya Samaj, though strictly monotheist, wouldn't even use murtis (statues) - they mostly worship through Havans/Homas (fire ceremonies)
oh man haha, the way I have been taught is meditation and feeling the bliss of god is the way foward haha, your right though hindu's have different beliefs, but how are we supposed to explain to a non-hindu when what we say, is not what another Hindu believes haha
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nucdev
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#1625
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#1625
(Original post by SunDun111)
oh man haha, the way I have been taught is meditation and feeling the bliss of god is the way foward haha, your right though hindu's have different beliefs, but how are we supposed to explain to a non-hindu when what we say, is not what another Hindu believes haha
Haha welcome to the headache that is explaining Hinduism :rofl:
Forget about to non-Hindus, most Hindus themselves are pretty uninformed about our variety and diversity.

Whenever, I'm explaining something, I have to be so careful and try to reconcile the different systems and traditions or introduce caveats like "but this is one system of philosophy, others may disagree"
They don't call it the world's most complex religion for nothing. (Type "world's most complex religion" into Google :toofunny:)
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nucdev
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#1626
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#1626
(Original post by BrokenLife)
Okay, so this is probably going to sound very stupid of me but I'm still going to ask since I have very little info on Hinduism.

Does Hinduism play monopoly of truth? That is to say whether it believes that it is the ONLY real and true religion.

And I've heard a few times how some people marry dogs for some reasons in India etc ...I'm sorry if this sounds offensive but I'm not trying to be rude, genuinely have no idea whether its a religious or cultural practice?
Do you mean "claim", in that case it doesn't. It accepts all other religions and pathways as being equally valid: "Ekam Sat Vipraha Bahudha Vedanti" = "Truth is One, the wise call it by different names". (Rig Veda 1.164.46).

There's an old Hindu saying;
There are hundreds of paths up the mountain, all leading to the same destination, so it doesn't matter which path you take.
The only one wasting time is the one who runs around and around the mountain, telling everyone else that their path is wrong.
And similarly there's a prayer that millions of Hindus recite everyday which says:
The many paths based on the different philosophies are but alternative ways (to reach the Greatest Truth) and people, on account of their different aptitudes, choose from them whatever they think best and deserved to be accepted.
But just as the sea is the final resting place for all types of streams, You alone are the only destination for all people whichever path, straight or zigzag, they may accept.
I personally love this quote from Swami Vivekananda:
We Hindus do not merely tolerate, we unite ourselves with every religion, praying in the mosque of the Mohammedan, worshipping before the fire of the Zoroastrian, and kneeling to the cross of the Christian. We know that all religions alike, from the lowest fetishism to the highest absolutism, are but so many attempts of the human soul to grasp and realise the Infinite. So we gather all these flowers, and, binding them together with the cord of love, make them into a wonderful bouquet of worship.


As to the second part of your question: :lolwut:
I have never heard of that lmao. Have occasionally heard of people marrying trees, but never dogs. I assume it's mostly cultural. Although, as the poster below you said, there's a lot of other cultural/non-religious things have become part of Hinduism.

Spoiler:
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No idea if you'll see my answer, but hey, I tried!
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SunDun111
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#1627
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#1627
(Original post by nucdev)
Haha welcome to the headache that is explaining Hinduism :rofl:
Forget about to non-Hindus, most Hindus themselves are pretty uninformed about our variety and diversity.

Whenever, I'm explaining something, I have to be so careful and try to reconcile the different systems and traditions or introduce caveats like "but this is one system of philosophy, others may disagree"
They don't call it the world's most complex religion for nothing. (Type "world's most complex religion" into Google :toofunny:)
Tbh even though its diverse and that is a positive thing, its kinda hard if you have a hindu friend, yet you have completley different beliefs to relate to him? Is they any parts of the whole belief system which unites us all together do you think?
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Suave
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#1628
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#1628
(Original post by SunDun111)
Tbh even though its diverse and that is a positive thing, its kinda hard if you have a hindu friend, yet you have completley different beliefs to relate to him? Is they any parts of the whole belief system which unites us all together do you think?
All paths lead to advaita vedanta.
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SunDun111
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#1629
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#1629
(Original post by Suave)
All paths lead to advaita vedanta.
Can you elaborate on that point pls?
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spv
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#1630
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#1630
(Original post by SunDun111)
Tbh even though its diverse and that is a positive thing, its kinda hard if you have a hindu friend, yet you have completley different beliefs to relate to him? Is they any parts of the whole belief system which unites us all together do you think?
Although, there are multiple paths, the general theme is the same.
Like think of all the motorways coming to London. London is the "main theme" and there's multiple ways of getting there depending on which path you find best.
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spv
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#1631
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#1631
(Original post by SunDun111)
Can you elaborate on that point pls?
Essentially what I said below. Everyone is on their own "quest" or path, but looking for the same thing.


(Original post by spv)
Although, there are multiple paths, the general theme is the same.
Like think of all the motorways coming to London. London is the "main theme" and there's multiple ways of getting there depending on which path you find best.
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Carnigiecbd
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#1632
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#1632
I think a lot of the pro-pakistani and pro-muslim racism running around is racist to South Indians. The pro-muslim racism is also very pakistani-centric, which in turn feels anti-south-indian.

I also think that the pro-muslim lobby is overlooking anti-hindu elements, eventhough we're a minority, when they should be defending Muslims against Christians.

Most of the "Islamaphobia" isn't even Islamaphobia but simply racism.
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nucdev
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#1633
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#1633
Happy Holi, everyone!

Enjoy:


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raman_17
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#1634
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#1634
(Original post by nucdev)
Happy Holi, everyone!

Enjoy:


I've seen it now!! brilliant
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nucdev
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#1635
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#1635
(Original post by raman_17)
I've seen it now!! brilliant
Excellent haha
Aaah man I so wanna go there :lol:

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raman_17
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#1636
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#1636
(Original post by nucdev)
Excellent haha
Aaah man I so wanna go there :lol:

WOW that looks soooooooooooo fun woooooooooooow
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SunDun111
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#1637
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#1637
anyone else think the way Star wars is portrayed is similar to some ways of Hinduism?
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nucdev
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#1638
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#1638
(Original post by SunDun111)
anyone else think the way Star wars is portrayed is similar to some ways of Hinduism?
Can't really answer from a personal point of view since I've only seen like one Star Wars film, but remember that Jay Lakhani video I posted sometime back (page 76)? - he said that the makers of Star Wars and Avatar borrowed a lot of stuff from Hinduism. I'll take his word for it Lmao
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SunDun111
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#1639
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#1639
(Original post by nucdev)
Can't really answer from a personal point of view since I've only seen like one Star Wars film, but remember that Jay Lakhani video I posted sometime back (page 76)? - he said that the makers of Star Wars and Avatar borrowed a lot of stuff from Hinduism. I'll take his word for it Lmao
I swear they have haha, some of the concepts reminds me of Hinduism,
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TheALevelStudent
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#1640
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#1640
(Original post by SunDun111)
anyone else think the way Star wars is portrayed is similar to some ways of Hinduism?
George Lucas (the author) said in the prolog of the orginal book that it was based on a religon in the north of India lol. So one would presume it's sikhi. However as sikhi and Hinduism are both dharmic, yes you could definatley say that Star Wars is very similar to our religions lol.

• Jedi’s don’t believe in Material Attachment (Moh), Greed (Lobh), Lust (Kaam), Krodh (Anger), (Hankaar)Egotism or false pride. Jedi’s believe in control of these basic carnal emotions and so do Sikhs.• Always are armed with their lightsaber (Sikhs with their Kirpan), and never parted.• Sikh’s believe in a code of conduct and a code of dress, as do the Jedi’s;• Sikh’s believe in protecting the weak and poor and always standing up for Justice. So do the Jedi’s;• Jedi’s have women warrior’s , who are equals of men. So do Sikhs (Mai Bhago etc)• Sikh’s have a Council of the wise. Sikhs have a “Panchayat” and the Panj Pyarey• Sikh’s concept of God is formless, and is around us and within us. The idea of the “Force” is essentially the same.


P.s. Which film is your favourite?
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