Do we confront our true feelings about race? Watch

naivesincerity
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Do we, and particularly those who see themselves as forward thinking liberals, not confront our true feelings about race, instead claiming that it's only culture that matters and race is superficial? To people with this view we could ask; If the population of Britian was, however unrealistic this is, replaced by those of entriely African, Indian, and Far-Eastern descent, would there not be anything, emotionally or spiritually, that they'd miss? Do we all have minor racist tendencies, and might there be a rational explanation for such tendencies? Is racism instinctive and natural or an unnatural, non-sensical construct?
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Mr_H
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(Original post by naivesincerity)
Do we, and particularly those who see themselves as forward thinking liberals, not confront our true feelings about race, instead claiming that it's only culture that matters and race is superficial? To people with this view we could ask; If the population of Britian was, however unrealistic this is, replaced by those of entriely African, Indian, and Far-Eastern descent, would there not be anything, emotionally or spiritually, that they'd miss? Do we all have minor racist tendencies, and might there be a rational explanation for such tendencies? Is racism instinctive and natural or an unnatural, non-sensical construct?
are you saying that appreciating that different races and ethnicities may have different emotional/spiritual/moral positions could be considered as racist, even if your respect for the different views is the same for each?
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Dougie
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(Original post by naivesincerity)
Do we all have minor racist tendencies?
Try one of the tests on this website: https://implicit.harvard.edu/implicit/
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naivesincerity
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I did it. Not a very scientific test IMO.
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oink
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however unrealistic this is
You think it's unrealistic? Are you in denial?
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psychic_satori
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(Original post by naivesincerity)
I did it. Not a very scientific test IMO.
The problem with the test is that they purposefully start the test with the minority group being paired with "bad." People are going to be more likely to pair minority groups with "bad things" accidentally later in the test than they might have been if they weren't exposed to the initial section of the test.

It's so manipulative and insulting. They could easily have made their test better by varying the order that the sections of the test are presented, but they chose not to, probably because of their own agenda.
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ArthurOliver
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When I was a "forward thinking liberal" I had inconsistent and fundamentally racist views, lots of truths I wouldn't face and moral calls I'd fudge or avoid.

BUT - I was with the herd, and with the people who supposedly matter -- our govt, academic, media, and business elites, who were all seemingly true-believers. Nowadays I know that they are phoneys, and I know that it's actually very easy and morally right to treat Whites like you would Blacks or Asians and to be honest about very plain differences between ethnic groups.

I think you are right about self-censorship among good-willed people NSincerity, but I see a fresh race-realist under-current in the conservative and even liberal media. I assume it has something to do with the HgenomeP and the expectations many psychologists and behavioral geneticists have that the "social" differences which have proved impossible to eradicate have at least some genetic basis.

A thought I had today: given the emphasis always on somehow having Black academic achievement and behaviour reach White standards, do our self-censorers assume that White norms are superior to Black. Why shouldn't they try to have Whites adopt Black attitudes to education, pimping, misogyny, crime, stupidity, violence, parenthood etc...? Are the equalitarians the real White Supremacists?

http://www.nydailynews.com/front/sto...p-334913c.html
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naivesincerity
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I'm not necessarily saying that I think racism is rational or based on anything more than people's conditioned liking for their own race. There may or may not be a scientific explanation for racism..
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Greyhound02
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I had a brief go at the nationalism test. However, I love the UK and the US (partly because I'm very right wing, but also because I've been there a few times and quite like it) so I'm not sure what it was trying to do. For lefties with an irrational dislike of the US it might have made a big difference.

It would have been better to have a country that most people in the UK strongly dislike like France or Germany
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Ferrus
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Cultural sumpremacy, or for that matter religious sumpremacy is not concomitant with racial sumpremacy. They may both be as arrogant and nefarious as each other, but that does not entail them as being synonymous.
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shinytoy
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(Original post by psychic_satori)
The problem with the test is that they purposefully start the test with the minority group being paired with "bad." People are going to be more likely to pair minority groups with "bad things" accidentally later in the test than they might have been if they weren't exposed to the initial section of the test.

It's so manipulative and insulting. They could easily have made their test better by varying the order that the sections of the test are presented, but they chose not to, probably because of their own agenda.
agreed. i found that i associated e with the word 'good' and i with 'bad'. then when these became coloured people i associated black with the same 'i' as 'bad'. so when they were switched, my result wasnt because i associate blacks with bad, but becuase i associated the 'i' key with the word 'black' and 'bad'. this test is racist and biased. in fact im latin so am partly black myself
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Higgy
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No we dont confront our true feelings as people are too scared of being politically inncorrect
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leannan
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(Original post by naivesincerity)
Do we all have minor racist tendencies, and might there be a rational explanation for such tendencies? Is racism instinctive and natural or an unnatural, non-sensical construct?
I believe that prejudice is learned in childhood. Even if your parents were not at all racist, it is learned within our enviornment, starting with something as innocent as cartoons. If you happen to catch an episode of "Tom and Jerry" you will see prejudice and stereotypes. This is true with many other old school cartoons that still play on satelite T.V. today.

Along with this, prejudice sneeks in through inappropriate offhand jokes, and several other types of everyday occurences. When this happens, I think it is the adults responsibility to explain to the child that this is a prejudiced view, and use the opportunity to give them a well rounded view of a culture or race they may not have known before.
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preparationH
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(Original post by leannan)
I believe that prejudice is learned in childhood. Even if your parents were not at all racist, it is learned within our enviornment, starting with something as innocent as cartoons. If you happen to catch an episode of "Tom and Jerry" you will see prejudice and stereotypes. This is true with many other old school cartoons that still play on satelite T.V. today.

Along with this, prejudice sneeks in through inappropriate offhand jokes, and several other types of everyday occurences. When this happens, I think it is the adults responsibility to explain to the child that this is a prejudiced view, and use the opportunity to give them a well rounded view of a culture or race they may not have known before.
Actually I was very anti-racist as a child, it was only when I started an inner city secondary school with a high black population when I learned a few prejudices
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yawn
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(Original post by preparationH)
Actually I was very anti-racist as a child, it was only when I started an inner city secondary school with a high black population when I learned a few prejudices
When I lived in Lewisham, I witnessed very little racism.

It was only when I came to live in a predominantly white neighbourhood that I realised just how deep-seated it could be.

Quite a revelation. :rolleyes:
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BlackpoolCraig
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I just think that the whole way we treat race is silly. I hate filling out forms where you have to declare your "race/ethnicity". I'm what many would call white but I'm tempted to just but "black" on the next one, and if questioned about it, I'll just say "i've converted."

To me, the key word is "culture". The whole idea of "race", to me, just concerns who has or hasn't got a suntan, and to what extent.

Now "culture" is that thing that separates the north of england from the south, an scotland and wales from england, as well as that thing that makes the english so xenophobic and proud of it.
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leannan
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(Original post by preparationH)
Actually I was very anti-racist as a child, it was only when I started an inner city secondary school with a high black population when I learned a few prejudices
That is interesting. Do you feel you learned these prejudices from other white students or teachers, or from your own experience?

Growing up, I lived in a mostly white community (I am white also) and thought I had not grown up with prejudice views. But now looking back, I can see how I was exposed to them by society, which has a way of sneeking it in there without being overtly obvious.
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Higgy
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I live in a 98% white suburb, there was a coloured person in my primary school class until the last 2 terms of year 6. I never really thought about race until i started secondary school where there were a few kids from an inner city school that came here, mainly asian, there was hardly any mixing whatsoever between races and there were many occasions where pretty nasty racial figths broke out as the attitude by the white pupils was 'this a a white area we dont like those types in it', was sad to see but you learnt predjudice from your peers.

My suburb is very much middle class and most people vote conservative, if a black person is walking down the road the looks they get from the locals is a sight to be seen!
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Arminius
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Most people don't, because the pc police tell them is bad, the media tell them its bad. people don't tend to think about the issue.

Personally i think racism is a deeply ingrained human trait.

I can get along with people of other races, but if you were put in a room and asked to select who to kill and you had to choose who would it be?

If my family, freinds, black person, asian person for example. It would be an easy decision to make. I would first choose either the asian or black person. Then the white freind. And finall my own family.

I think most people would do the same, its a gut human reaction. We favour those who are genetically similar to ourselves. Hence strong family loyalty and to a lesser extend the foundation of race loyalty.

Its the main factor of all human allegiance, we generally prioritise people in order of genetic similarity. If all other things are roughly equal.
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Higgy
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Amen to that post
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