Near-native fluency? Watch

mauritius
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#21
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#21
(Original post by greeniev)
I'm now in my second year in England (now in the upper 6th) - I'm German. THe funny thing was that last year when the new school year began I'd already been a year in England, and I swear nobody suspected that I was non-English I can even imitate the chav-English sometimes... But anyway, people do ask me whether I'm foreign, but that's only cause I'm half-Asian and look like it. But generally people would think I'm English, or if they knew me better that I'd gone to an international school beforehand. Which is so not true, but hey!
It clearly depends on the motivation and desire to master the language. I know quite a lot of German people in my school who've been to international schools before, but still haven't quite gotten rid off their German accent (which I find hilarious at some point - no offence :p:). I really badly wanted to acquire the British accent and learn English - so I guess that also helped me with everything!
But maybe this is because you are considered Asian British. I have foudn this several times that Asian or African British considered their English perfect English, whereas for me itends up sounding still like English spoken by an African or Indian and I would hear this accent out even if I did not see the person.
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mauritius
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#22
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#22
One of my lecturers is originally German and she can not pronounce th but pronounces it as in typicall German accent "s", which is so fun because she furtherore does something we call "lispeln" in German, which means she can not pronounce certain combinations of "s" with other sounds similar to "s" or words with two "s" in them. It is really really sweet to listen to her and I would never want her to change this.
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greeniev
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#23
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#23
No, I'm actually not kidding, but people tell me that. I guess I'm pretty talented with languages... *tries not to sound too arrogant but fails* :p:
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gringalet
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#24
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#24
(Original post by ZanyZanny)
i think you can become fluent but native fluency is slightly harder as the majority of people who are taught a language lear it textbook this means that when you do go to the country slang words you often do not understand and so you are no completely fluent. for example in my year there is someone who is from south africa and engligh is there second language she speaks engligh perfectly well but we will use words such as rate or other terms and they lose what we are on about as they were never taught the words
That's just slang though. Slang has more to do with sociolects (language of a group) and idiolects (language of an individual) than with being fluent or not.
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gringalet
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#25
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#25
(Original post by mauritius)
But maybe this is because you are considered Asian British. I have foudn this several times that Asian or African British considered their English perfect English, whereas for me itends up sounding still like English spoken by an African or Indian and I would hear this accent out even if I did not see the person.
And there's no such thing as 'perfect' English, or any language...but that's just me getting on my linguistic high horse
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mauritius
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#26
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#26
(Original post by gringalet)
And there's no such thing as 'perfect' English, or any language...but that's just me getting on my linguistic high horse
Well, I meant with this English as it is spoken by native speakers - without foreign accent. Whether British always speak gramatically correct is a different question...:flutter:
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paddy
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#27
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#27
(Original post by mauritius)
Well, I meant with this English as it is spoken by native speakers - without foreign accent. Whether British always speak gramatically correct is a different question...:flutter:
You would not believe some of the stuff that comes out of peoples' mouths! I go to a private school and some people there sound as if they've come from straight from inner-city London, nevermind that their parents own the local stables:rolleyes:
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mauritius
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#28
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(Original post by paddy357)
nevermind that there parents own the local stables:rolleyes:
I can imagine...
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paddy
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#29
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#29
(Original post by mauritius)
I can imagine...
Whoops
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Gael
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#30
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talk about it...theres this one girl in my class who talks like she's from the ghetto...and shes a rich middleupper class white kid going to public school...it's just embarassing lol. (not because i'm snobby, just because she's kidding herself...dont get me wrong)
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Mr. Jim
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#31
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#31
(Original post by mauritius)
Quote:
Originally Posted by paddy357
nevermind that there parents own the local stables

------------
I can imagine...
omg i was just watching lost and they subtitled some korean and it said "i know that you're father..."

i almost died. :p:
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discombobulation
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#32
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I've seen some really unbelievable subtitling on foreign films...the American subtitling isn't too good especially on 'Der Untergang' and 'Der Himmel über Berlin'
It does make me giggle seeing some of the funny subtitles
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paddy
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#33
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#33
(Original post by mr jim)
omg i was just watching lost and they subtitled some korean and it said "i know that you're father..."

i almost died. :p:
But Lost is so good!
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discombobulation
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#34
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(Original post by paddy357)
But Lost is so good!
It is amazing...i have really really bad dvd copies though and missed most of it on tv so Im kind of creating a story
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Inquisitive
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#35
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Well a degree isn't an end, just a means. You would need to be immersed with the language to reach near-native. A degree would only get you to about intermediate or near-advanced at most.
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gringalet
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#36
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#36
(Original post by mauritius)
Well, I meant with this English as it is spoken by native speakers - without foreign accent. Whether British always speak gramatically correct is a different question...:flutter:
Accents are completely subjective though, and often to do with prestige. All about standards, blah blah...but I do get what you're saying.
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Ludivine
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#37
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(Original post by Inquisitive)
Well a degree isn't an end, just a means. You would need to be immersed with the language to reach near-native. A degree would only get you to about intermediate or near-advanced at most.
I have to say, I disagree with how so many people seem to be thinking achieving near-native fluency is such an impossible task with a just degree. Perhaps it's just my own experience but I'm almost certain I can manage it. It all depends what you put in.
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mauritius
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#38
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#38
(Original post by Ludivine)
I have to say, I disagree with how so many people seem to be thinking achieving near-native fluency is such an impossible task with a just degree. Perhaps it's just my own experience but I'm almost certain I can manage it. It all depends what you put in.
I would just not want to make a wrong impression; Many students who apply for language degrees whom I know (cos I work with them occasionally resenting the university, etc.) seem to really believe they do a language degree and afterwards speak the languages fluently, like natives. I find this particulrly wrong for exotic languages and joint anguage degrees. In Arabic, for example, BA graduates from any normal university (not Oxbridge of course... ) will be lucky if they can somewhat read a newspaper. And joint language courses really demand a lot of effort and spending time in the respective country is really really important. Think of your language teachers in school - they all did degrees in these languages but are they really good in the language? None of mine was only close to really fluent, and as for German I must say that MANY people have a very bad pronounciation, which may only be a detail but in the end it contriutes to whether someone can be understood. On the other hand, of course, there are always brilliant students who will graduate with a language degree and be some of the best speakers of foreign languages ever, especially if they continue working with a language. The real difference is I think in the attitude of students - do they consider their studies like school studies or are they really having a relation to the language, do they use it?
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brimstone
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#39
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#39
(Original post by mauritius)
I find this particulrly wrong for exotic languages and joint anguage degrees. In Arabic, for example, BA graduates from any normal university (not Oxbridge of course... ) will be lucky if they can somewhat read a newspaper. ?
Why do you think this? I'm pretty sure if someone manages to graduate from a language degree, they know a little more than how to read a newspaper.
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mauritius
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#40
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#40
(Original post by brimstone)
Why do you think this? I'm pretty sure if someone manages to graduate from a language degree, they know a little more than how to read a newspaper.
Not if you study Arabic, Chinese, or Urdu.
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