Your Top 10 degrees? Watch

xstudentx
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#61
Report Thread starter 12 years ago
#61
(Original post by ChemistBoy)
Yes I know. I also know many unemployed Modern Language grads, interpreter jobs are like rocking horse poo. Most business people can speak english, especially in europe.
yeah thats very true
0
reply
kanuma
Badges: 0
#62
Report 12 years ago
#62
(Original post by ChemistBoy)
Yes I know. I also know many unemployed Modern Language grads, interpreter jobs are like rocking horse poo. Most business people can speak english, especially in europe.
very very true.
Ive also talked to people up here doing a computer science (god i cant spell today!!) and they struggle to find jobs.

Im doing Chemical engineering, ive got several computer programing modules. Ive had one course running this year (in a completely dead language) and ive got anouther 2 courses next year.
Id say chemical engineering will always get you a good job with a brilliant starting salary!
I realy dont see the point in most Arts degrees (does law count as an art? if it does im not includeing it here). I mean honestly what are you going to do with philosophy and russian joint honors? or even worse a history of ART
0
reply
dismal_laundry
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#63
Report 12 years ago
#63
(Original post by ChemistBoy)
Yes I know. I also know many unemployed Modern Language grads, interpreter jobs are like rocking horse poo. Most business people can speak english, especially in europe.
Nice. I wasn't thinking about interpreting.
0
reply
xstudentx
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#64
Report Thread starter 12 years ago
#64
(Original post by kanuma)
very very true.
Ive also talked to people up here doing a computer science (god i cant spell today!!) and they struggle to find jobs.

Im doing Chemical engineering, ive got several computer programing modules. Ive had one course running this year (in a completely dead language) and ive got anouther 2 courses next year.
Id say chemical engineering will always get you a good job with a brilliant starting salary!
I realy dont see the point in most Arts degrees (does law count as an art? if it does im not includeing it here). I mean honestly what are you going to do with philosophy and russian joint honors? or even worse a history of ART
i always thoguth computer science was a pretty flexible degree, and difficult to get into (asking for average of ABB)if applying to a decent university.
0
reply
President_Ben
Badges: 13
#65
Report 12 years ago
#65
(Original post by dismal_laundry)
Nice. I wasn't thinking about interpreting.
Diplomatic service etc.?

Very few jobs going in that... and the skills needed go far beyond being able to chat in the language.
reply
Drogue
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#66
Report 12 years ago
#66
(Original post by Elles)
medicine is a minority fringe subject? :p:
Medicine has fewer applicants per offer. The website says that 15.4% of med applicants are successful, compared to 14.4% for E&M :p:
0
reply
Elles
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#67
Report 12 years ago
#67
(Original post by Drogue)
Medicine has fewer applicants per offer. The website says that 15.4% of med applicants are successful, compared to 14.4% for E&M :p:
hmm, although the 2003-2005 direct college applicants-offers ratio table in the most recent prospectus suggests more Medicine applicants per offer - 5.0 v. 4.6!

With regards to the confound of open applications in that table - 2005 entry there were 3 more open E&M applications - although if this is a rapidly closing gap might account - given we're talking about 3 year averages?

Another explanation for the apparent discrepancy could be Open Offers, Medicine definitely utilises but E&M apparently doesn't & presumably these aren't counted in the the prospectus table, BUT as strategic over-offers to compensate for missing grades/not fulfilling the additional occupational health hoops we have to jump through - counting these in terms of "subscription" to the course places represented numerically by the specified college offers...?


i'd like to see applicants *per place* before i grant you the life afirming status of claiming "most oversubscribed course" without any comment. :p:
0
reply
ChemistBoy
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#68
Report 12 years ago
#68
(Original post by dismal_laundry)
Nice. I wasn't thinking about interpreting.
Then what? What other specialist knowledge does modern languages give you that other graduates do possess other than the ability to speak and write fluently in another language (a skill that can be acquired without the need of university level education)? Essentially that is a key factor in employability.
0
reply
Drogue
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#69
Report 12 years ago
#69
(Original post by Elles)
hmm, although the 2003-2005 direct college applicants-offers ratio table in the most recent prospectus suggests more Medicine applicants per offer - 5.0 v. 4.6!

With regards to the confound of open applications in that table - 2005 entry there were 3 more open E&M applications - although if this is a rapidly closing gap might account - given we're talking about 3 year averages?

Another explanation for the apparent discrepancy could be Open Offers, Medicine definitely utilises but E&M apparently doesn't & presumably these aren't counted in the the prospectus table, BUT as strategic over-offers to compensate for missing grades/not fulfilling the additional occupational health hoops we have to jump through - counting these in terms of "subscription" to the course places represented numerically by the specified college offers...?


i'd like to see applicants *per place* before i grant you the life afirming status of claiming "most oversubscribed course" without any comment. :p:
I personally think apps per place is a silly measure. It's why Bristol can have 10 apps per place for a some economics courses, but under 2 apps per offer. Apps per - place would make it seem very hard to get into, when it really isn't. I have to admit I don't know apps per place, but to me, most oversubscribed course is about the % of people who are successful, as defined by the university.

Moreover, 2003-2005 measures wouldn't give an accurate position, considering how applications have shifted in that time. I know economics courses are a lot harder to get in for now than when I applied, with universities across the board upping grades needed to cope with too much demand.

I think you could make a case for each. Give they publish on the website that more medicine students, as a percentage, are successful, I feel it's quite easy to justify E&M as being more oversubscribed. Easier to get in for, almost certainly, but more oversubscribed.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Are you chained to your phone?

Yes (108)
19.78%
Yes, but I'm trying to cut back (222)
40.66%
Nope, not that interesting (216)
39.56%

Watched Threads

View All