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    Am I reading this right?

    C. For honours bachelors degrees, the weighting of Levels in the profile of grades and grade-point average for the determination of award and classification shall be:
    Level 1: no weighting;
    Level 2: 1/3;
    Level 3: 2/3.
    D. Where a student’s profile of grades does not exceeded the maximum volumes of credit permitted at grades below D- and s/he has met any associated conditions for the successful completion of the programme, s/he will be eligible for the highest class of award for which they fulfil one or more of the following sets of criteria:



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    So if we get 66% of our grades at 7.5 GPA which is C-, we get a 2.1?

    or if we get 66% of our grades at 10.5 GPA which is B-, we get a first? >.>
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    Hey, I'm final year Brunel and clueless about degree classification. What you have said appears to be right but at the same time surely it can't be!? Where did you find this info lol?

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    (Original post by benfrost)
    I'm final year Brunel and clueless about degree classification. [...] Where did you find this info lol?
    The information is in the Senate Regulations. If you would like a link, please PM me.

    The new system is confusing. However, I believe it is more progressive than a, perhaps more understandable, "means-based average" system. This is because the new approach attempts to compensate for outliers. The consequence of this, being, that if a student did well in general, a small number of very poor grades does not disadvantage them (as much).

    (Original post by cru_jo0)
    So if we get 66% of our grades at 7.5 GPA which is C-, we get a 2.1?
    or if we get 66% of our grades at 10.5 GPA which is B-, we get a first?
    Not quite.

    Based on my interpretation of Appendix A of SR 2 (post-2009), students calculate their grade points (GP) for each module using the table in SR 2.50. Then examine what number of modules (remembering that final year modules count for double, and excluding first year modules) fit each classification band to see what % of modules were "first class", "upper second", etc. They can then see the GPA required to get a "first class", "second class", etc.

    If 66% of the (weighted) grades are B- (60%/11pts) to B+ (69%/13pts) (2.1 equivalent) then the overall grade point average required to get a 2.1 classification is only 7.5pts.

    If 66% of your (weighted) grades are A- (70%/14pts) to A* (100%/17pts) (1.1 equivalent), then the overall grade point average required to get a 1.1 classification is only 10.5pts.
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    Thanks for your help. I might be being stupid but I still don't fully understand that.

    So if for example you had 66% of your modules at a GPA of 7.5 in Year 2 and then 7.5 again in Year 3, this would equate to a 2:1 because ultimately you have fulfilled one of the criteria for a 2:1 (even accounting for the weighting) a 7.5 in both years would work out at over 66% of your GPA being 7.5- therefore this would be enough for a 2:1.

    Is this correct or am I trying to look at it in too simple terms?

    Ben
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    For simplicity, let's assume a case where the student has passed every module, all grades A-C. Let's also assume the following grade profile for an undergraduate honours course totalling 120 credits each year:

    Code:
    Y2	A	B+	B+	B-	C-	C
    	20	20	20	20	20	20
    						
    Y3	B+	B	A*	C+	B+	
    	20	20	20	20	40
    Weighting for credits, using blocks of 20 for simplicity, then converting to degree class equivalent and grade points, we get the following:

    Code:
    Y2	15	13	13	11	8	9		(Mean = 11.5)
    	1.1	2.1	2.1	2.1	2.2	2.2
    						
    Y3	13	12	17	10	[13	13 ]		(Mean = 13)
    	2.1	2.1	1.1	2.2	[2.1	2.1]
    Counting the number of modules in each classification band, again weighting for credits (blocks of 20) and level (1/3 Y2, 2/3 Y3), produces the following table:

    Code:
    Total		Weighted Total	Weighted Percentage (%)
    1.1		2				3				16.66
    2.1		7				11				61.11
    2.2		3				4				22.22
    3.1		0				0				00.00
    
    GPA = ("Y1 GPA Mean" + (2 * "Y2 GPA Mean") ) / 3
    GPA = (11.5 + (2 * 13) ) / 3
    GPA = 12.5
    Since the student has no grades below D- and has achieved all available credits, s/he can be considered for a "first class". However, the student only has 16.66% of modules in this class band, so does not have the necessary grades for a "first class" (minimum being 33%).

    The student can now be considered for an "upper second class". Since the student has 61.11% of grades in this class, according to table D the required grade point average to qualify (at above 58% but below 66%) is 11.5. The student has achieved above this GPA requirement and consequently is awarded an "upper second class".

    Does this make the process (by my interpretation) a bit clearer?
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    (Original post by benfrost)
    if for example you had 66% of your modules at a GPA of 7.5 in Year 2 and then 7.5 again in Year 3, this would equate to a 2:1 because ultimately you have fulfilled one of the criteria for a 2:1 (even accounting for the weighting) a 7.5 in both years would work out at over 66% of your GPA being 7.5- therefore this would be enough for a 2:1.
    A grade point of 7 is equivalent to a D+ and a grade point of 8 is equivalent to a C-. So the outlook is not great. In a means-based system, a GPA of 7.5 would be a borderline lower second class, perhaps even a third.

    However, using the post-2009 system, it really depends on your spread of grades. If 66% of your grades were in the upper second class band (B- to B+), then you could still qualify for an upper second class. However, this is a very unusual and unlikely scenario. Especially since, according to table B in SR2, grades below D- can compromise which bands you can be considered for (e.g. you cannot get a "first" if you have any grades below D-).

    Let's assume the following:

    Code:
    Year 2	B-	B-	B-	D	D-	D-
    		20	20	20	20	20	20
    						
    Year 3	B-	B-	B-	B-	D-	D-
    		20	20	20	20	20	20
    In this example, the student would be a borderline upper second class. This is because they achieved 61% of their grades (weighted) in the "upper second" band. Thus, requiring a minimum GPA of at least 8.5, which (if my math is correct) has been obtained with this profile.

    Is this any clearer?
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    Hello,
    Can you please explain to me how you worked out the percentages (eg: 61.11%)
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    If somebody did a placement year (And scored a 52 which would equate to 8 on the GPA system), for example, would the formula be:

    (GPA Y1 + 8 + (2 x GPA Y3)) / 3 ?
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    (Original post by MonzMinz)
    Hello,
    Can you please explain to me how you worked out the percentages (eg: 61.11%)

    6 modules per year (as dissertation basically counts as two modules)
    third year counts for double second year, so add them all up you have 18 grades.
    So 11 of his grades were 2.1 the method is:
    11 / 18 =0.611
    0.611 x 100 = 61.11

    So out of all the 18 possible grades 61.11% of his were at a 2.1.
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    I also need to find this out. Can anyone help on this matter.


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    According to these if I get 58% of my grades at GP 8.5 or above I get a 2.1. GP 8.5 is equal to a C. So if most of my grades are a C i get a 2.1?
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    Anyone that has any idea?
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    simple explenation from a current student

    year 1 worth nothing towards your degree.

    year 2 worth 1/3

    year 3 worth 1/3

    dissertation/final project worth 1/3

    2:2 50% overall
    2:1 60%
    1 70%+

    however modules have outcomes that must be met for instance in one of my modules there is a multiple choice eam which you must get 75+ on to take the written exam however if you get 50-75% in the multiple choice exam you are capped to a D- for that module.
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    also each assignment/exam you get a lettered grade

    each module is woth so many credits out of 120 per year.

    so to get a 1st in year 2 you would need an average of A in all asssignments

    example

    6x 20 credit modules.

    so each module is worth 1/6 of that years grade
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    Wrong, you also have to fit all the additional criteria above that box you're looking at. Eg, 54% over 9.0, 50% over 9.5.... and including 41% at least 10.5. So you can't just get a grade point of 8.5 for every module and get a 2.1. 41% of grades would have to be at a B- or above.
 
 
 
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