Would you get Private dental treatment or NHS? Watch

FelixFelicis
Badges: 8
#1
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#1
I need a root canal. My dentist is insistent that private is the way to go (probably because it'll cost me a few hundreds pounds), but I want to know whether there is any real difference between NHS treatment and private treatment?

He told me the material used to fill the tooth if you go private is better, and that there is less chance of infection. Is this true?

If anyone knows anything about teeth or has experience with NHS/private treatment, I'd really appreciate some advice..
0
reply
jennifex
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#2
Report 7 years ago
#2
As far as I know there's no difference other than the price. You should be able to choose the filling material whether it's private or NHS. White fillings cost more but you can still have them on the NHS. I don't know why your dentist would say that there is less chance of infection if you go private, in most cases you just get the same dentist doing the same treatment whether you're a private or NHS patient.

It's almost like he's saying "I will do a better job if you go private" which can't be ethical.
0
reply
moya
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#3
Report 7 years ago
#3
That's a load of crap. Your NHS dentist should give you white fillings if he/she feels they are necessary, otherwise there's no harm in normal ones (which last longer anyway).

Just go NHS.
0
reply
FelixFelicis
Badges: 8
#4
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#4
(Original post by jennifex)
As far as I know there's no difference other than the price. You should be able to choose the filling material whether it's private or NHS. White fillings cost more but you can still have them on the NHS. I don't know why your dentist would say that there is less chance of infection if you go private, in most cases you just get the same dentist doing the same treatment whether you're a private or NHS patient.

It's almost like he's saying "I will do a better job if you go private" which can't be ethical.
I didn't know you could have white fillings on the NHS? I really don't know if I can trust him. It's a really good surgery but that's because it's a private surgery which has just started treating NHS patients. I managed to get my name on the list quickly.
0
reply
FelixFelicis
Badges: 8
#5
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#5
(Original post by moya)
That's a load of crap. Your NHS dentist should give you white fillings if he/she feels they are necessary, otherwise there's no harm in normal ones (which last longer anyway).

Just go NHS.
I don't think it's a question of white fillings. I think it's more to do with the material used to fill the root of the tooth before they put a filling on top.
0
reply
jennifex
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#6
Report 7 years ago
#6
(Original post by FelixFelicis)
I didn't know you could have white fillings on the NHS? I really don't know if I can trust him. It's a really good surgery but that's because it's a private surgery which has just started treating NHS patients. I managed to get my name on the list quickly.
Yes of course you can have white fillings on the NHS, they just cost a bit more. The NHS pay 20% of whatever treatment you have and you pay the rest. Can I ask if you are over 18? This might be the confusion because you get free dental care until you're 18 (or 19 if in full time education), and in that case they might not do a white filling for free. I'm not really sure.

Anyway I certainly wouldn't take any nonsense about him not doing the job as well if you have it on the NHS, or scaring you into thinking you will get infections if you don't pay a fortune. Just remind him of the ethical requirements of his profession if he says anything like that. It is true that there might be a wider choice of materials if you go private and perhaps he just meant that one of those is better quality or something (it is possible) but that doesn't mean that you're going to suffer if you go for NHS.

It really depends if you want to pay extra for something that may or may not actually be any better. I've never had any problems with NHS dental care and don't know anyone who has other than the odd filling coming out. I think private is a waste of money but it's up to you, it's your money.
0
reply
FelixFelicis
Badges: 8
#7
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#7
(Original post by jennifex)
Yes of course you can have white fillings on the NHS, they just cost a bit more. The NHS pay 20% of whatever treatment you have and you pay the rest. Can I ask if you are over 18? This might be the confusion because you get free dental care until you're 18 (or 19 if in full time education), and in that case they might not do a white filling for free. I'm not really sure.

Anyway I certainly wouldn't take any nonsense about him not doing the job as well if you have it on the NHS, or scaring you into thinking you will get infections if you don't pay a fortune. Just remind him of the ethical requirements of his profession if he says anything like that. It is true that there might be a wider choice of materials if you go private and perhaps he just meant that one of those is better quality or something (it is possible) but that doesn't mean that you're going to suffer if you go for NHS.

It really depends if you want to pay extra for something that may or may not actually be any better. I've never had any problems with NHS dental care and don't know anyone who has other than the odd filling coming out. I think private is a waste of money but it's up to you, it's your money.
I have an HC2 form so I don't pay anything at all. Probably will end up going for NHS. Just a bit confused and annoyed at how pushy he was. Thanks for your help!
0
reply
catoswyn
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#8
Report 7 years ago
#8
(Original post by FelixFelicis)
I have an HC2 form so I don't pay anything at all. Probably will end up going for NHS. Just a bit confused and annoyed at how pushy he was. Thanks for your help!
I had root canal work on the NHS and it was absolutely fine. If the tooth is towards the back of your mouth then the filling may be black. I would not pay extra under these circumstances. Save your money for if you need a procedure another time that cannot be funded by the NHS. For instance I had a complete course of gum treatment/cleaning by a private dental hygenist. This was really good and improved my gums and teeth no end. However you can't get funding for this on the NHS even with a HC2 despite the fact that poor gum health is a major cause of tooth loss, infection and can even lead to other health complications. If the treatment you are interested in is available on the NHS take it.

I'd be interested to know if he is saying he personally uses different materials for different types of patients or whether this applies to everyone?

Good luck.

0
reply
moya
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#9
Report 7 years ago
#9
(Original post by catoswyn)
I had root canal work on the NHS and it was absolutely fine. If the tooth is towards the back of your mouth then the filling may be black. I would not pay extra under these circumstances. Save your money for if you need a procedure another time that cannot be funded by the NHS. For instance I had a complete course of gum treatment/cleaning by a private dental hygenist. This was really good and improved my gums and teeth no end. However you can't get funding for this on the NHS even with a HC2 despite the fact that poor gum health is a major cause of tooth loss, infection and can even lead to other health complications. If the treatment you are interested in is available on the NHS take it.

I'd be interested to know if he is saying he personally uses different materials for different types of patients or whether this applies to everyone?

Good luck.

It's possible that the dentist would use a different material. I had a temporary filling done with a greek dentist (can't actually remember where he came from) which my other NHS dentist doesn't usually use, and had to read the note from the dentist saying what it was. But either way, there is no 'best' material to use.

It's actually best to get a younger dentist.
0
reply
FelixFelicis
Badges: 8
#10
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#10
(Original post by catoswyn)
I had root canal work on the NHS and it was absolutely fine. If the tooth is towards the back of your mouth then the filling may be black. I would not pay extra under these circumstances. Save your money for if you need a procedure another time that cannot be funded by the NHS. For instance I had a complete course of gum treatment/cleaning by a private dental hygenist. This was really good and improved my gums and teeth no end. However you can't get funding for this on the NHS even with a HC2 despite the fact that poor gum health is a major cause of tooth loss, infection and can even lead to other health complications. If the treatment you are interested in is available on the NHS take it.

I'd be interested to know if he is saying he personally uses different materials for different types of patients or whether this applies to everyone?

Good luck.

As far as I understand, it is a case of one material for private patients, another material for NHS patients. He is saying that the material used with private treatment is a better filler as it is more dense, and as a result, it is less likely that bacteria will settle and result in infection.

(Original post by moya)
It's possible that the dentist would use a different material. I had a temporary filling done with a greek dentist (can't actually remember where he came from) which my other NHS dentist doesn't usually use, and had to read the note from the dentist saying what it was. But either way, there is no 'best' material to use.

It's actually best to get a younger dentist.
So there is no best material used to fill in the tooth after a root canal? Are you a Dentistry student by any chance?
0
reply
moya
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#11
Report 7 years ago
#11
(Original post by FelixFelicis)
As far as I understand, it is a case of one material for private patients, another material for NHS patients. He is saying that the material used with private treatment is a better filler as it is more dense, and as a result, it is less likely that bacteria will settle and result in infection.


So there is no best material used to fill in the tooth after a root canal? Are you a Dentistry student by any chance?
No I'm not, but the nhs aren't going to give you permanent fillings that aren't permanent, since they will have to spend even more money for when it might get infected again.

Actually for me it would just depend on the dentist...if they are nice or not
0
reply
jennifex
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#12
Report 7 years ago
#12
(Original post by FelixFelicis)
As far as I understand, it is a case of one material for private patients, another material for NHS patients. He is saying that the material used with private treatment is a better filler as it is more dense, and as a result, it is less likely that bacteria will settle and result in infection.


So there is no best material used to fill in the tooth after a root canal? Are you a Dentistry student by any chance?
Well, as I said it *is* true that a private dentist might use a different material. See page 3 of this document:

http://www.oft.gov.uk/shared_oft/con...ral/oft660.pdf

But whether or not there is a massive amount of evidence to back up the claim that this other material is better quality/ makes it less likely that bacteria will settle is another matter. He might just want to sell it to you. Like all the extras they try to sell you when you buy a pair of glasses or something! It might just make private patients feel like they are getting something for their money. Who knows? Certainly the material they use for NHS work will have met all of the quality standards and shouldn't cause problems.

Clean your teeth twice a day and bacteria shouldn't settle anyway!

(Also, if you're really worried you could always go and get a second opinion from another dentist, or find out what these materials are and look them up and weigh up the options for yourself)
0
reply
JuneBlackfearn
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#13
Report 4 years ago
#13
Hello.
I am a dentist working in two different practices: NHS and private. For a Root canal treatment in the private we use equipment that cost a few thousand pounds and the consumables for an easy 1h root canal treatment cost around £80.
It is impossible with the NHS pricing (£50 paid by the patient and £20 by the NHS) to afford this equipment or the materials used.

In life you get what you pay for.

NHS is not bad. It meets the minimum requirements. But the private dental treatment is totally different.

Choose the best you can afford.
0
reply
quentinhamilton
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#14
Report 4 years ago
#14
private
0
reply
minor bun engine
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#15
Report 4 years ago
#15
Standard root filling materials have been used successfully for decades, there are some new ones on the market that private practices may have incorporated recently but as of yet there hasn't been any evidence to suggest they are a significant improvement (worth spending hundreds extra on). Just go with NHS.
0
reply
Kayleighw27
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#16
Report 4 years ago
#16
I always go private for my dental treatment. The superior quality of care and treatment I receive are very well worth the money. NHS practices are under-funded and over-subscribed with long wait times etc. I've always found the practice I go to to be very punctual and much more comfortable. Just little things like how there is a tv above the chair you can watch, and they always give you glasses and a bib to wear which you don't get on the NHS make a difference. You get a far wider selection of treatment if you're paying for it yourself, such as clear or invisible braces, white fillings, teeth whitening, a scale and polish, etc. The only type of filling the NHS offers are grey amalgam which look horrible and ugly. You only get one set of teeth so it's worth taking care of them. Also dental treatment on the NHS isn't free anyway. My friend had a root canal done on the NHS and now one of her teeth is completely grey. If you go private you can choose the materials they use and end up with a much better looking result. Also the people saying you can get treatment like this partly paid for by the NHS are wrong, you can't pick and choose. Some NHS practices also offer private treatment, but if you wanted a white filling you'd have to pay for it yourself. It may well be cheaper than an exclusively private practice, but the NHS won't cover any of the cost.
0
reply
AspiringMedic8
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#17
Report 4 years ago
#17
(Original post by FelixFelicis)
I need a root canal. My dentist is insistent that private is the way to go (probably because it'll cost me a few hundreds pounds), but I want to know whether there is any real difference between NHS treatment and private treatment?

He told me the material used to fill the tooth if you go private is better, and that there is less chance of infection. Is this true?

If anyone knows anything about teeth or has experience with NHS/private treatment, I'd really appreciate some advice..
Privately, the dentist will spend far longer doing the procedure and therefore probably do a better job of it. A dentist's time is his money!


Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
ForgetMe
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#18
Report 4 years ago
#18
I've had some root canals done under NHS and no complaints. For private treatment, I choose to go abroad because it's way too expensive here in the UK :erm: For example, I need one tooth crown on my tooth (well, now 2 because a part of another tooth fell off), I've checked one private practice, it's like £600+ for just a crown excluding other costs, so that's £1200 just for crowns :erm: For that amount of money I can probably do my whole mouth abroad.
0
reply
AspiringMedic8
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#19
Report 4 years ago
#19
(Original post by ForgetMe)
I've had some root canals done under NHS and no complaints. For private treatment, I choose to go abroad because it's way too expensive here in the UK :erm: For example, I need one tooth crown on my tooth (well, now 2 because a part of another tooth fell off), I've checked one private practice, it's like £600+ for just a crown excluding other costs, so that's £1200 just for crowns :erm: For that amount of money I can probably do my whole mouth abroad.
Even looking to another part of the UK apart from the South would probably reduce the bill too.


Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Do you work while at uni?

Yes I work at university (71)
33.02%
No I don't (102)
47.44%
I work during the holidays (42)
19.53%

Watched Threads

View All