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    Hey All,

    The problem is: School doesn't allow me to drop Chinese A to Chinese B (despite many of my classmates being able to do so with a score of 4).

    Backing things up, despite the fact that I live in a family that frequently uses Cantonese in day-to-day conversation, it is easy for an individual to overlook the fact that Cantonese and Chinese are seriously two different languages! With English, what you speak directly translates to what you write. If you make a sound, I would easily have a general idea of how its spelt, such as "Oomph". With Chinese, we're dealing with characters here and there is absolutely no link to the way you pronounce a word, and the way you write it. Thus, it is simply unfair to assume that while I'm from a Chinese background, that I am fluent in Chinese.

    In fact, in primary school the expectations for Chinese were very low to the extent that we learnt how to say the weather. As opposed to now I am expected to write commentaries! This is simply ridiculous.

    What's more is that ever since I had been in secondary school, I had been a borderline 4 student. And I have spoken to my teachers requesting to drop to Chinese B, though they have insisted that I have the potential to get at least a 5. That is utter bull****. Chinese isn't a language you can study overnight (unlike Chem, Physics, Math, Econ), it is a skill that one must accumulate over the years, and since my foundation of Chinese is weakly consolidated, suddenly dropping me into a IB Chinese A class is like dropping a fish out of water (granted I was a Chinese A student all along, I was always a borderline 4).

    Once again, I spoke to the teachers and they have all agreed to keep me in Chinese A. I know for a fact that multiple people dropped to B based on the fact that they simply did **** purposefully in exams/essays. I am a noble person (and I don't get to say that a lot), thus I really really did try my best spending over 3 nights on an essay that should've taken 40 minutes, but what I am truly worried about is when the time for the exam comes, when I don't have my notes/internet, or the infinite time, I'd fail. And this is evident as for my last mock exam, I got a 3.

    I've spoken with teachers, head of language, the vice principal. Some times even with my parents involved. But I honestly think it's pointless. Hell, I even hired a tutor -- ridiculously expensive -- and she was so disappointed in my language (and quite shocked initially that I was taking Chinese as language A), that she refused to continue teaching me as she simply said "I don't know how to teach you if you don't even know a simple term like this -- that a Year 7 would've known".

    Sorry about this long post, if you're still reading this:

    I) DOES IB GIVE ME THE OPTION TO RESIT AN EXAM, ON CHINESE B INSTEAD (despite me studying Chinese A in school)?
    II) WHAT ELSE SHOULD I DO?
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    What about dropping it to A2? I'm assuming you're taking A1 now?
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    What's the difference between A2 and A1.

    I'm already taking English A1, so I think Chinese is equally A?

    Either way I don't think it'd make a difference. I've had a look at some of Chinese B past papers and I have to admit they are challenging still (and dropping me wont guarantee me a 7). But me staying here in Chinese A is simply impossible to get more than a 5 (if a 5 at all)
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    (Original post by Chemit)
    What's the difference between A2 and A1.

    I'm already taking English A1, so I think Chinese is equally A?

    Either way I don't think it'd make a difference. I've had a look at some of Chinese B past papers and I have to admit they are challenging still (and dropping me wont guarantee me a 7). But me staying here in Chinese A is simply impossible to get more than a 5 (if a 5 at all)
    u in hongkong???

    say if you drop to B, then what?? you take English A1???

    if u are confident with Eng A1, say easy to get at least 6, then take Chinese B, I personally do not think language B worth learning, one doesn't need to learn to get a 7 in Lan B
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    Hi Chemit,

    Mind telling me (either publicly or in a private message) which school you are in. There is a good chance that I'll end up in the same situation and I know a few who went through the same.
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    (Original post by TTGenius)
    u in hongkong???

    say if you drop to B, then what?? you take English A1???

    if u are confident with Eng A1, say easy to get at least 6, then take Chinese B, I personally do not think language B worth learning, one doesn't need to learn to get a 7 in Lan B
    No. I'm already taking English A, and on top of that, another language, Chinese A as well. (so technically I should get a bilingual diploma -- not that I need/want one).

    English is definitely a guaranteed 7, there is no doubt. It's my first language after all.

    As for Chinese A, I think I'm averaging at a 4 though our school's grade doesn't adequately reflect the IB expectations; since I've done an IB mock exam in school, and achieved a marginal 3. Therefore, I think the 3 should be put into more consideration than the 4 (which is simply a misleading number considering that its based on essays that my tutor has gone over, presentations done with my more-superior classmates, etc)

    So definitely, I'm already taking English A already, but the school -- for some reason -- insists I take Chinese A as well!

    I have a strong belief that "this reason" is due to the fact that our school (being international and all), wants to achieve the maximum % of bilingual IB diploma students... though, obviously, as a student's perspective, I am only looking to maximize my potential marks for universities, and of course, learn in the process. With Chinese A -- I don't feel like I am or will make any progress, as after all, language is really based on your foundation (especially at a younger age), which obviously I lack in Chinese.
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    (Original post by Chemit)
    No. I'm already taking English A, and on top of that, another language, Chinese A as well. (so technically I should get a bilingual diploma -- not that I need/want one).

    English is definitely a guaranteed 7, there is no doubt. It's my first language after all.

    As for Chinese A, I think I'm averaging at a 4 though our school's grade doesn't adequately reflect the IB expectations; since I've done an IB mock exam in school, and achieved a marginal 3. Therefore, I think the 3 should be put into more consideration than the 4 (which is simply a misleading number considering that its based on essays that my tutor has gone over, presentations done with my more-superior classmates, etc)

    So definitely, I'm already taking English A already, but the school -- for some reason -- insists I take Chinese A as well!

    I have a strong belief that "this reason" is due to the fact that our school (being international and all), wants to achieve the maximum % of bilingual IB diploma students... though, obviously, as a student's perspective, I am only looking to maximize my potential marks for universities, and of course, learn in the process. With Chinese A -- I don't feel like I am or will make any progress, as after all, language is really based on your foundation (especially at a younger age), which obviously I lack in Chinese.
    pity man........

    fxxk your school..... if I were u, I will protest, u know the worst thing u can do is to change a school. I guess if u threatening them this way, they'll back off... For ur future, don't let the school turn your down.

    on the other hand, I'm sure the school cares more about the average IB marks rather than bilingual rates. Talk to them seriously. It's Honkong, not the mainland... should be more democratic, right????
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    Not at the sign of their recent elections.

    Anyway, its the complete opposite for my school. Somehow no one was allowed a bilingual subject choice this year (unless you do an EE in the language). So instead of taking Mandarin A2 (which I am a fluent speaker) I am now taking Mandarin B HL.

    Not complaining that much, I'm getting a 7.
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    (Original post by Chemit)
    What's the difference between A2 and A1.

    I'm already taking English A1, so I think Chinese is equally A?

    Either way I don't think it'd make a difference. I've had a look at some of Chinese B past papers and I have to admit they are challenging still (and dropping me wont guarantee me a 7). But me staying here in Chinese A is simply impossible to get more than a 5 (if a 5 at all)
    A2 is sort of a level in between B and A1... it requires less literature and such. I know that they changed the syllabus this year, so I don't know whether that still exists, but it's worth asking around for?
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    A2 doesn't exist not more from now on, we are the last generation....

    is there a difference between Mandarin A1 and Chinese A1????
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    (Original post by TTGenius)
    A2 doesn't exist not more from now on, we are the last generation....

    is there a difference between Mandarin A1 and Chinese A1????
    In Chinese A1 you can present your FOA (and participate in in-class discussion) using Cantonese, Mandarin, or any other dialect that's "Chinese". Mandarin is strictly mandarin only.

    Either way I think the main issue is the Head of Chinese -- which also happens to be an IB examiner and has some random workshops (mainly his opinion is very valued). Everyone either is neutral (such as the principal himself), or agrees I should drop (my teacher for 4 years), except him.

    I'm planning to use my grade-3 mock exam paper, and this reference letter from my tutor (claiming my Chinese is sub-par and inappropriate for A), to use to support my arguments. I'm seeing both the principal (the one that ultimate decides), who completely values the "Head of Chinese"'s opinion.

    It really sucks how they want to boost their billingual diploma rate. Last year they had like 90% students with bilingual... so I suppose that's why they wish to maintain it. It's simply wrong.
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    (Original post by Chemit)
    In Chinese A1 you can present your FOA (and participate in in-class discussion) using Cantonese, Mandarin, or any other dialect that's "Chinese". Mandarin is strictly mandarin only.

    Either way I think the main issue is the Head of Chinese -- which also happens to be an IB examiner and has some random workshops (mainly his opinion is very valued). Everyone either is neutral (such as the principal himself), or agrees I should drop (my teacher for 4 years), except him.

    I'm planning to use my grade-3 mock exam paper, and this reference letter from my tutor (claiming my Chinese is sub-par and inappropriate for A), to use to support my arguments. I'm seeing both the principal (the one that ultimate decides), who completely values the "Head of Chinese"'s opinion.

    It really sucks how they want to boost their billingual diploma rate. Last year they had like 90% students with bilingual... so I suppose that's why they wish to maintain it. It's simply wrong.
    u have my supports
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    I have a similar problem with you right now!! can u guys answer mine plz? http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...4#post40231954
 
 
 
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