MSc Advanced Computer Science - Best undergraduate degree?

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    Would a Maths and Computer Science degree be better than a straight Computer Science degree? I have interest in Machine Learning and would probably want a PhD in that later on... I am mainly considering MSc Advanced Computer Science at Cambridge as a possible postgrad course, which of the two undergraduate courses would the admission tutors favor/would be beneficial?
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    You dont need a Masters to do a PhD, if you do a 4 years MSci in compsci or maths+compsci at the best university you can get into, and apply directly after that. The only time a MSc would be needed is if you were going into a substantially different field, or if your undergrad degree was weak for whatever reason (mid tier university and only a low 2:1, top university but a 2:2, low tier university and anything)

    To answer your question though, it doesnt mater, they would both be equally good for geting onto that MSc
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    (Original post by bmqib)
    Would a Maths and Computer Science degree be better than a straight Computer Science degree? I have interest in Machine Learning and would probably want a PhD in that later on... I am mainly considering MSc Advanced Computer Science at Cambridge as a possible postgrad course, which of the two undergraduate courses would the admission tutors favor/would be beneficial?
    Get a First in your UG, do a research project, then do a PhD. Don't waste time investing in a MSc. Completely not worth it - my opinion of course.

    Depends on the UG degree; if the modules are balanced and comprehensive enough, I'd go for the Maths and CS. But if it's not, then I'd go for the straight CS.

    I did CS before if it helps.
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    (Original post by poohat)
    You dont need a Masters to do a PhD, if you do a 4 years MSci in compsci or maths+compsci at the best university you can get into, and apply directly after that. The only time a MSc would be needed is if you were going into a substantially different field, or if your undergrad degree was weak for whatever reason (mid tier university and only a low 2:1, top university but a 2:2, low tier university and anything)

    To answer your question though, it doesnt mater, they would both be equally good for geting onto that MSc
    If it's a 4 year course, then maybe you don't need it. However, if you are planning to do a 3 year course, then I would recommend doing it.

    I did a 3 year UG CS course at the best uni in my country (finishing now) and I certainly felt the need to do a masters before a PhD. I barely heard anything about Natural Language Processing during my UG, so it's most welcome that I get to focus on this during the masters.

    It also gives you an opportunity to work with potential supervisors for the PhD - they get to know you, you get to know them. In best case - you have an edge when applying for PhD and funding, in the worst case, you find out that you don't really like working with them and can apply elsewhere.

    The ACS requirement is A-levels math, so application wise I don't think it matters. Usefulness wise, Math is very important. Please note that I haven't started the masters course yet, but at current level I would prefer it if I had a few more Math modules compared to peripheral CS subjects in my UG.

    It comes down to individual programs.
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    (Original post by kka25)
    Get a First in your UG, do a research project, then do a PhD. Don't waste time investing in a MSc. Completely not worth it - my opinion of course.
    I would have said the same in the past, but undergrad degrees now cost £9k/year, so in some sense your 4rth MSci year costs the same as a MSc. And since (depending on the university) MSc's are sometimes structured better and have more choice of modules , it might be a reasonable idea to switch.

    However a MSc does have several drawbacks - there are't (m)any career advantages unless you do the MSc at a better university or it is a very specific program that very closely matches your PhD area, you have to pay the fees up front and live without a student loan, youre going to waste at least a month with applications, and you face the disruption of moving city. So personally I would stick to the MSci unless the MSc is top class (eg Cambridge Part III) or you are upgrading your university substantially, just because it makes life easier.
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    (Original post by Sever)
    If it's a 4 year course, then maybe you don't need it. However, if you are planning to do a 3 year course, then I would recommend doing it..
    I dont think there are any advantages of registering on a 3 year course in the UK - if you register for the MSci you usually have the option of dropping down to a BSc halfway through if you dont want to stay on. And yes I agree a 3 year degree would often require a MSc afterwards to get onto a PhD, mainly because you miss out on the MSci project.
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    All you need is a 2.1 in a computing-related degree, which includes some software programming components or where relevant software programming experience has been subsequently acquired.

    You may want to look at our MSc Advanced Computing course http://www.brunel.ac.uk/courses/post...G400UADVNCDCMP
 
 
 
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