ktommo
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Hi everyone, so in a couple of weeks I'll be sitting the English Lit exam, which I am really nervous about!
I'm predicted an A/A*, but I'm worried I won't be able to achieve this. I got a C in the mock, however I think I have an A/A* on my coursework which would push up my grade.
I have done a practice question on poems. I am studying relationship poems. Would you be able to see what grade this would achieve and what I can do to improve. Thank you!

'Compare how a relationship is presented in 'The Manhunt' and one other poem from relationships'

My Answer:
The word 'relationship' is a term used to describe the connection between two or more people (or objects). 'The Manhunt' describes a relationship between a soldier and his wife, whereas 'Nettles' talks about a father and son relationship. These two poems both express feelings of love and compassion; 'The Manhunt' also shares attitudes of passion and fear felt by a woman for her injured husband.

Unusual imagery is used in 'The Manhunt' to draw in interest to the poem. The soldier is described as delicate by the narrator with the words "porcelain" and "parachute silk". Not only does this reflect on the physical state of the soldier but the mental one as well. This will seem strange to the reader as soldiers are typically portrayed as strong and tough individuals who can't be hurt by anyone or thing. The voice makes references to a baby and links this to her husbands current state. "foetus of metal" is used to portray him to be someone who has been weakened by what has happened to him, but who is trying to grow stronger.

'Nettles' also uses imagery which is unusual and again incorporates a theme of war and battle. Nettles which have hurt the narrators son are referred to as "green spears" and a "regiment of spite". This is strange as although nettles can cause irritation and slight pain, they are not as forceful as weapons used in war. The use of hyperbole emphasises the love felt from the father towards his son, as he finds it unbearable that his son has been hurt. Therefore he has a need to protect him and to prevent it from occurring again.

Cheerful and simple rhyming couplets used in 'The Manhunt' contrast with the seriousness of the subject explained in the poem. However it could be seen as an attempt to repair the fractured mind of the soldier, as well as his physical injuries which include a "punctured lung" and "broken ribs".

A simple rhyme scheme is also used in 'Nettles' to tell of a serious matter. This could be as not to confuse the narrator any more as he is already upset at the thought of not being able to protect his song from all of the obstacles in life that will be in his way. This is shown in the sentence "My son would often feel sharp wounds again." Because of the narrative form and use of enjambment it makes it seem as though a story is being told from personal experience.

In 'The Manhunt' the voices feelings towards her husband are explored. The reader can tell she feels extreme, intense love for him because of the way she cares for him and how she helps him overcome his injuries. "handle and hold" and "mind and attend" show the loving thought expressed in helping him to become better. The poem also explores the effects of war on an individual; "grazed heart" and "unexploded mine buried deep in his mind" tell of the negative effects of the experience.

A parents feelings for his child are expressed in 'nettles'. The father cares for his son when he is hurt. "We soothed him till his pain was not so raw" suggests he spent along time with him ensuring his son was alright. This shows the father deeply loves his soon, as does the anger he feels for the nettles that hurt the boy. He loves him so much he is determined they will never hurt him again, so attempts to destroy them; "slashed in fury". Despite this, he eventually realises he can't prevent his son being hurt in the future.

Both of these poems share similar themes including love, compassion and war imagery. They both have simple rhyme schemes and show the narrator deeply caring for the people they love. A strong, loving relationship is presented in the two poems. The wife in 'The Manhunt' helps her husband to come close to her again, whilst the father in 'Nettles' unhappily realises he can't protect his son from life, no matter how hard he tries.
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hingelyr1
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Hi i am about to sit the same exam in 2 weeks and i am expected an A/A*. This is a good response but to improve try to use close texual analyse by coming up with orginal interpretations of the poems and thier deeper meaning
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ktommo
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thank you!
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hingelyr1
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No probz good luck with it
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Varunaen
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(Original post by ktommo)
Hi everyone, so in a couple of weeks I'll be sitting the English Lit exam, which I am really nervous about!
I'm predicted an A/A*, but I'm worried I won't be able to achieve this. I got a C in the mock, however I think I have an A/A* on my coursework which would push up my grade.
I have done a practice question on poems. I am studying relationship poems. Would you be able to see what grade this would achieve and what I can do to improve. Thank you!

'Compare how a relationship is presented in 'The Manhunt' and one other poem from relationships'

My Answer:
The word 'relationship' is a term used to describe the connection between two or more people (or objects). 'The Manhunt' describes a relationship between a soldier and his wife, whereas 'Nettles' talks about a father and son relationship. These two poems both express feelings of love and compassion; 'The Manhunt' also shares attitudes of passion and fear felt by a woman for her injured husband.

Unusual imagery is used in 'The Manhunt' to draw in interest to the poem. The soldier is described as delicate by the narrator with the words "porcelain" and "parachute silk". Not only does this reflect on the physical state of the soldier but the mental one as well. This will seem strange to the reader as soldiers are typically portrayed as strong and tough individuals who can't be hurt by anyone or thing. The voice makes references to a baby and links this to her husbands current state. "foetus of metal" is used to portray him to be someone who has been weakened by what has happened to him, but who is trying to grow stronger.

'Nettles' also uses imagery which is unusual and again incorporates a theme of war and battle. Nettles which have hurt the narrators son are referred to as "green spears" and a "regiment of spite". This is strange as although nettles can cause irritation and slight pain, they are not as forceful as weapons used in war. The use of hyperbole emphasises the love felt from the father towards his son, as he finds it unbearable that his son has been hurt. Therefore he has a need to protect him and to prevent it from occurring again.

Cheerful and simple rhyming couplets used in 'The Manhunt' contrast with the seriousness of the subject explained in the poem. However it could be seen as an attempt to repair the fractured mind of the soldier, as well as his physical injuries which include a "punctured lung" and "broken ribs".

A simple rhyme scheme is also used in 'Nettles' to tell of a serious matter. This could be as not to confuse the narrator any more as he is already upset at the thought of not being able to protect his song from all of the obstacles in life that will be in his way. This is shown in the sentence "My son would often feel sharp wounds again." Because of the narrative form and use of enjambment it makes it seem as though a story is being told from personal experience.

In 'The Manhunt' the voices feelings towards her husband are explored. The reader can tell she feels extreme, intense love for him because of the way she cares for him and how she helps him overcome his injuries. "handle and hold" and "mind and attend" show the loving thought expressed in helping him to become better. The poem also explores the effects of war on an individual; "grazed heart" and "unexploded mine buried deep in his mind" tell of the negative effects of the experience.

A parents feelings for his child are expressed in 'nettles'. The father cares for his son when he is hurt. "We soothed him till his pain was not so raw" suggests he spent along time with him ensuring his son was alright. This shows the father deeply loves his soon, as does the anger he feels for the nettles that hurt the boy. He loves him so much he is determined they will never hurt him again, so attempts to destroy them; "slashed in fury". Despite this, he eventually realises he can't prevent his son being hurt in the future.

Both of these poems share similar themes including love, compassion and war imagery. They both have simple rhyme schemes and show the narrator deeply caring for the people they love. A strong, loving relationship is presented in the two poems. The wife in 'The Manhunt' helps her husband to come close to her again, whilst the father in 'Nettles' unhappily realises he can't protect his son from life, no matter how hard he tries.
this is a very basic response - strongly revolving around the mid Band 3 if being mildly generous. You have barely compared the two poems closely (10% of the marks is awarded for this). You have not provided your own and alternative interpretation other than that explicitly stated - which I'm sure every higher candidate will manage, making your response near insignificant. Furthermore, it seems you have forced yourself to talk about the structure - rhyme scheme - though this barely adds impact to the answer - in simple terms, it demonstrates your ability to appreciate poetry inadequate. Finally, considering that you have 45 minutes for this section - it is clear that you have issues with timing as for most of the basic analysis you could've given some consideration and perhaps evaluative criticisms. Sorry, if I've been too harsh, but if you want an A* you really need to work on these areas as you have barely touched on the AO's.

By the way you have given far too few quotations - which brings your grade down enormously as you are unable to evident your response.

Other minors;

Don't need the introduction unless its focussed on the question - which yours is not.
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mozzacolfer
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Hi! I'm sitting this exam in a week as well! I'm doing a resit from last year, so I'm guessing you're in Year 10?
Anyway, your work is really good, but I've got a couple of tips that my teacher gave me for the exam:

You (apparently) don't need an introduction or conclusion for Section A and Section B of the exam, as you aren't marked for it in the exam.
To get in Band 6 (A*) you need to pick out pieces of quotes and analyse them (which I think you've done) but you also need to EVALUATE (this is very important so I'm putting it in bold ) This basically means that you have to say the effect of the quote on the reader (but don't say 'It makes it more interesting' or 'It makes you want to read on') and also answer the question at the end of each paragraph.

Seeing as you already have A* in the controlled assesment, your UMS mark should mean that you don't necessarily need to get an A* in the exam to get A* overall (although I think at the lowest you'll need to get a B)
Good luck in the exam!
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Varunaen
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(Original post by mozzacolfer)
Hi! I'm sitting this exam in a week as well! I'm doing a resit from last year, so I'm guessing you're in Year 10?
Anyway, your work is really good, but I've got a couple of tips that my teacher gave me for the exam:

You (apparently) don't need an introduction or conclusion for Section A and Section B of the exam, as you aren't marked for it in the exam.
To get in Band 6 (A*) you need to pick out pieces of quotes and analyse them (which I think you've done) but you also need to EVALUATE (this is very important so I'm putting it in bold ) This basically means that you have to say the effect of the quote on the reader (but don't say 'It makes it more interesting' or 'It makes you want to read on') and also answer the question at the end of each paragraph.

Seeing as you already have A* in the controlled assesment, your UMS mark should mean that you don't necessarily need to get an A* in the exam to get A* overall (although I think at the lowest you'll need to get a B)
Good luck in the exam!
i have already sat the exam June 2010 and got an A*. Thanks for the advice any how and all the advice provided by your teacher are effective.
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paperclip345
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I heard that for there will be three poems in each cluster that will not be asked about in the Higher Tier paper? Does anyone know what these are? (I'm doing the Relationships section)
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Varunaen
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(Original post by paperclip345)
I heard that for there will be three poems in each cluster that will not be asked about in the Higher Tier paper? Does anyone know what these are? (I'm doing the Relationships section)
The poems that only appear in the foundation tier and not in the higher tier are Sister Maude, In Paris With You and Brothers.

Hope this helps
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paperclip345
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(Original post by Varunaen)
The poems that only appear in the foundation tier and not in the higher tier are Sister Maude, In Paris With You and Brothers.

Hope this helps
Thank you so much for replying! + rep
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kingtaco
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(Original post by Varunaen)
The poems that only appear in the foundation tier and not in the higher tier are Sister Maude, In Paris With You and Brothers.

Hope this helps
Hi

How do you know these will not appear in the higher tier?
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SteelCookie
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(Original post by kingtaco)
Hi

How do you know these will not appear in the higher tier?
Ditto, wouldn't want to shift concentration on tge other poems and they suddenly come up.
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jcarz
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(Original post by kingtaco)
Hi

How do you know these will not appear in the higher tier?

(Original post by SteelCookie)
Ditto, wouldn't want to shift concentration on tge other poems and they suddenly come up.

It says it here. This is from AQA's website.

http://store.aqa.org.uk/resourceZone...-TRB-U01TG.PDF
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AnisahL
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I don't think that piece would get an a* if I'm honest

You need to analyse each quote properly, use this device: PQA
P - point
Q - quotation
A - analysis

Do this for 3 or 4 quotes and you'll do great, good luck!
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gabic
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(Original post by jcarz)
It says it here. This is from AQA's website.

http://store.aqa.org.uk/resourceZone...-TRB-U01TG.PDF
that's so great! i don't have to revise them much then, phew, thank you so much.
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ktommo
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I got an A overall in English Lit, thank god. So worries I wasn't going to, especially where teachers seem to think it was harshly marked!!
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Flyingharp
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I tried to the 2011 past paper and it I found it extremely hard. I just wanted to see if someone could help me improve what I've written and give me some good techniques to use tomorrow. Here it is:

Compare the ways poets convey emotions in 'Nettles' and one other poem in relationships.

'I love thee to the depth and breadth and height' is a group of three which is hyperbole and helps the reader to understand the love the narrator in Sonnet 43, talks so highly of. 'Ideal grace' implies that the two lovers are as pure as the 'sun' In comparison, the narrator in Nettles expresses the 'fury' a parent may feel towards the dangers their child could encounter. This emotion is very compound and gives the reader the impression that the nettles are murderous. A 'regiment of spite' allures to a battle which the narrator is determined to win.

'I love thee purely' suggests that the love the narrator feels for their lover is more complex and deep than most other couples.


It's not finished and I know it's not my best piece of work, but it's all I could down know.
I need all the help I can get!
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Zaara96
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(Original post by jcarz)
It says it here. This is from AQA's website.

http://store.aqa.org.uk/resourceZone...-TRB-U01TG.PDF
this link doesn't work
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K2 18b
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You’re answers really good it helped me a lot. I’m sure you got an A for it!
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K2 18b
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(Original post by ktommo)
Hi everyone, so in a couple of weeks I'll be sitting the English Lit exam, which I am really nervous about!
I'm predicted an A/A*, but I'm worried I won't be able to achieve this. I got a C in the mock, however I think I have an A/A* on my coursework which would push up my grade.
I have done a practice question on poems. I am studying relationship poems. Would you be able to see what grade this would achieve and what I can do to improve. Thank you!

'Compare how a relationship is presented in 'The Manhunt' and one other poem from relationships'

My Answer:
The word 'relationship' is a term used to describe the connection between two or more people (or objects). 'The Manhunt' describes a relationship between a soldier and his wife, whereas 'Nettles' talks about a father and son relationship. These two poems both express feelings of love and compassion; 'The Manhunt' also shares attitudes of passion and fear felt by a woman for her injured husband.

Unusual imagery is used in 'The Manhunt' to draw in interest to the poem. The soldier is described as delicate by the narrator with the words "porcelain" and "parachute silk". Not only does this reflect on the physical state of the soldier but the mental one as well. This will seem strange to the reader as soldiers are typically portrayed as strong and tough individuals who can't be hurt by anyone or thing. The voice makes references to a baby and links this to her husbands current state. "foetus of metal" is used to portray him to be someone who has been weakened by what has happened to him, but who is trying to grow stronger.

'Nettles' also uses imagery which is unusual and again incorporates a theme of war and battle. Nettles which have hurt the narrators son are referred to as "green spears" and a "regiment of spite". This is strange as although nettles can cause irritation and slight pain, they are not as forceful as weapons used in war. The use of hyperbole emphasises the love felt from the father towards his son, as he finds it unbearable that his son has been hurt. Therefore he has a need to protect him and to prevent it from occurring again.

Cheerful and simple rhyming couplets used in 'The Manhunt' contrast with the seriousness of the subject explained in the poem. However it could be seen as an attempt to repair the fractured mind of the soldier, as well as his physical injuries which include a "punctured lung" and "broken ribs".

A simple rhyme scheme is also used in 'Nettles' to tell of a serious matter. This could be as not to confuse the narrator any more as he is already upset at the thought of not being able to protect his song from all of the obstacles in life that will be in his way. This is shown in the sentence "My son would often feel sharp wounds again." Because of the narrative form and use of enjambment it makes it seem as though a story is being told from personal experience.

In 'The Manhunt' the voices feelings towards her husband are explored. The reader can tell she feels extreme, intense love for him because of the way she cares for him and how she helps him overcome his injuries. "handle and hold" and "mind and attend" show the loving thought expressed in helping him to become better. The poem also explores the effects of war on an individual; "grazed heart" and "unexploded mine buried deep in his mind" tell of the negative effects of the experience.

A parents feelings for his child are expressed in 'nettles'. The father cares for his son when he is hurt. "We soothed him till his pain was not so raw" suggests he spent along time with him ensuring his son was alright. This shows the father deeply loves his soon, as does the anger he feels for the nettles that hurt the boy. He loves him so much he is determined they will never hurt him again, so attempts to destroy them; "slashed in fury". Despite this, he eventually realises he can't prevent his son being hurt in the future.

Both of these poems share similar themes including love, compassion and war imagery. They both have simple rhyme schemes and show the narrator deeply caring for the people they love. A strong, loving relationship is presented in the two poems. The wife in 'The Manhunt' helps her husband to come close to her again, whilst the father in 'Nettles' unhappily realises he can't protect his son from life, no matter how hard he tries.
Hey this is really good it helped me a lot thanks. I’m sure you got an A for your GCSEs in the end
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