Could someone please look over my Inspector Calls essay?

Watch this thread
Taliahart
Badges: 9
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#1
Report Thread starter 10 years ago
#1
I'm taking my AQA GCSE in English Literature next week, and in preparation I wrote this 45 minute essay. I don't know too much about essay structure; I usually just write as it comes naturally. If anyone with experience in the play or essay writing could give me any tips (specific or general) I'd be unbelieveably grateful!


-------
Inspector Goole and Mr Birling have perhaps the most noticeably opposing views and philosophies of any two characters in the play. Priestley displays this through the ongoing conflict between the pair, and notably in their vastly contrasting speeches delivered separately in the play. In addition to the subtle details of their opposing views, this conflict successfully shows the contrasting philosophies of Birling and the Inspector.

As soon as they meet, Birling attempts to show his social superiority to the Inspector, boasting about his contacts in the police force. This highlights how social standing is very important to Birling and so, he assumes, is equally as important to everyone else. Couple this with his hints to Gerald early in the play that he is in line to “find his way into the next Honours list”, and the audience are shown how Birling feels that for one to be accepted, they must have privileges in society. This is not, however, a philosophy shared by the Inspector. Following Birling’s attempt at a threat (his claim that he plays golf with the chief constable), the Inspector ‘dryly’ responds that “I don’t play golf”. His use of the word “don’t” shows it is out of choice that he doesn’t play golf, not needing to conform to society’s expectations. This can, of course, be viewed in the wider context of the novel, and the Inspector’s views of social responsibility.

Both Birling and Inspector Goole make speeches within the play, showing their philosophies on this matter of social responsibility. Birling insists at the beginning of the play that “a man has to...look after himself and his own”. This view is further evidenced by his reaction towards the workers who initiated the strike at his works. Contrastingly, the Inspector’s later speech is one of a moral, socialistic view that “we are responsible for one another”. Since both of these speeches are the longest, most narrative pieces of text in the play, it makes the contrast so much more evident.

The main difference between the philosophies of Birling and the Inspector, is that of social responsibility. Whilst the Inspector insists that we are “all members of one body”, Birling could not disagree more. This is evidenced not only in his initial, capitalist speech, but also in his refusal to accept any responsibility for the death of Eva Smith. He’s content to think that he was “quite justified” in discharging Eva from his works and not to dwell further on the subject. This is shown to contrast with the Inspector, who throughout the play probes the characters – and audience- into believing that we are all “Intertwined”.

Throughout the play, the Inspector and Birling are displayed as opposites in looks, mannerisms, but most of all philosophies. The way that Priestley achieves this goes further than just their speeches and direct actions. By portraying the character of the Inspector as morally ‘right’, and the character of Birling as a ‘fool’ in general terms, it follows that their views and philosophies will contrast also. By having Sheila and Eric side with the philosophy of the Inspector, this is shown as the philosophy for the future. Birling, on the other hand, is shown to be out-dated and stupid, so that the Inspector’s socialist views ultimately triumph in the play.

-------------

If anyone answers, thank you so much!! x
1
reply
Kalliope
Badges: 17
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#2
Report 10 years ago
#2
(Original post by Taliahart)
x
Just looked over this and have a couple of thoughts. Generally very good though I'm really tired now so I'll come back sometime tomorrow and write properly but just replying now so that if I forget you're welcome to give me a nudge.
0
reply
Stephanie8
Badges: 2
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#3
Report 10 years ago
#3
Good
Have a clear structure - start from the beginning
you have to mention most of these points
Introduction Of Birling - speeches to younger generation
Interruptance of Inspector - stage directions
Intimidation between Inspector and Birling
Power Struggle
Sheila becomes Mouth Piece of Priestley goes against her father weakens Birling Power and Strengthens Inspector
Ends with the Inspector
Talk about how it starts with the birlings speech and then Eva Smith incident devalues mr birling ends with inspector what effect does the order of speech have
Also analyise the quotes don't just mention them and not say much about them as you need to refer to language and structure of play
0
reply
Taliahart
Badges: 9
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#4
Report Thread starter 10 years ago
#4
(Original post by Stephanie8)
Also analyise the quotes don't just mention them and not say much about them as you need to refer to language and structure of play
Thank you so much for the advice! I'll make sure I use it in the exam.

Do you have any tips on how I could analyse the quotes further, and how I can incorporate references to the structure/language of the play, because I know I need to include them, but they don't always seem relevant to the question.

Thanks!
0
reply
username967462
Badges: 14
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#5
Report 10 years ago
#5
Is that seriously a 45 minute answer (a whole essay) for GCSE lit?

I am doing intermediate 2 which (scottish) and we have too write about 3x the amount in the same period of time.
0
reply
Joey Tribbiani
Badges: 2
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#6
Report 10 years ago
#6
(Original post by Bubblyminty)
Is that seriously a 45 minute answer (a whole essay) for GCSE lit?

I am doing intermediate 2 which (scottish) and we have too write about 3x the amount in the same period of time.
I always thought it was the quality of your writing which mattered, rather than the quantity
0
reply
Taliahart
Badges: 9
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#7
Report Thread starter 10 years ago
#7
(Original post by Bubblyminty)
Is that seriously a 45 minute answer?.
Probably not. In our exam we have to answer three essay questions in 90 minutes. They advice us to do about 45 on the first, and 45 on the second two combined. I usually spend about 35 mins on the first, including planning, to ensure I have enough time to do the last 2. Quality over quantity, right?
0
reply
erp
Badges: 5
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#8
Report 10 years ago
#8
Do you get the inspector calls text in with you in this exam - unannotated?
0
reply
Didierr
Badges: 0
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#9
Report 10 years ago
#9
(Original post by erp)
Do you get the inspector calls text in with you in this exam - unannotated?
yep
0
reply
erp
Badges: 5
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#10
Report 10 years ago
#10
(Original post by Didierr)
yep
ah! thank you my teacher never mentioned anything about it I think i would die in the exam if i didn't! thanks
0
reply
username967462
Badges: 14
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#11
Report 10 years ago
#11
Oh I see. Yes concise answers are much better than long ones that waffle on and on. For ours to be releveant we would need to use at least three pieces or four of lined A4.

Well here we have to answer two questions- each 45 mins and on either a prose, drama, poem, tv or drama or language. Most people do the first 3 and we have to use at least 6-9 quotations which we memorise.

We do not get to take any books into the exam. Btw do you find using the book helpful?
0
reply
username967462
Badges: 14
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#12
Report 10 years ago
#12
Do you all get made to take both english and english lit?

Here it is combined into one; "english" .
0
reply
Taliahart
Badges: 9
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#13
Report Thread starter 10 years ago
#13
[QUOTE=Mill13;37650908]
(Original post by Taliahart)
Thank you! Those tips were really useful, and I now know what people mean when they say 'analyse the quotes more'.

Good luck with your exam Hope you do well!
0
reply
Mill13
Badges: 0
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#14
Report 10 years ago
#14
[QUOTE=Taliahart;37651058]
(Original post by Mill13)

Thank you! Those tips were really useful, and I now know what people mean when they say 'analyse the quotes more'.

Good luck with your exam Hope you do well!
That's okay Good luck to you too, you'll do great!
0
reply
Booyah
Badges: 16
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#15
Report 10 years ago
#15
One thing you could have mentioned about Birling in general is that he is a bully and tries to get his own way showing the aggressiveness of Birling and what is supposed to be a representation of the working man that he used to be.

Not to sure of a quote to show that but I am sure he tried to threaten or implies to threaten the Inspector.
0
reply
Taliahart
Badges: 9
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#16
Report Thread starter 10 years ago
#16
(Original post by Booyah)
One thing you could have mentioned about Birling in general is that he is a bully....
I did mention his threat to the Inspector, but I agree that I could have developed it far better. The point about him being an aggressive man (stemming from the working class) and a bully is an interesting point, which I'll definitely have to include if a question on Birling arises. Thanks!
0
reply
Stephanie8
Badges: 2
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#17
Report 10 years ago
#17
(Original post by Taliahart)
Thank you so much for the advice! I'll make sure I use it in the exam.

Do you have any tips on how I could analyse the quotes further, and how I can incorporate references to the structure/language of the play, because I know I need to include them, but they don't always seem relevant to the question.

Thanks!
'all members of one body' implies a sense of community and equality - and an undertone of religious teachings - similar to 'for we are all one in christ' - bible. Talk about how it ties in with Inspector being god like omniscient.
Remember analysis of language and structure is what gets you that A/A*
0
reply
Stephanie8
Badges: 2
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#18
Report 10 years ago
#18
Could someone please mark this? So sorry to do this on your forum.

How does Steinbeck use the character of Curley's wife in the novel as a whole to convey the ideas about America in the 1930's?

The novel is a microcosm, depicting a cross section of society which reflected it’s prejudices in this case women who had few rights. They were seen as inferior to men. Curley's wife was forced into loneliness and isolation; she had dreamed in hope of a better life often referred to at the time as ‘The American Dream’.

Central to Steinbeck’s novel is Curley’s Wife, Steinbeck uses her role on the ranch to portray the main themes and events. The lack of affection in her newly found marriage to Curley due to his personal insecurities, is the gate way to her search for companionship on the ranch as she is often seen trying to interact with the workers.
However, she is never accepted as some of the ranchers see her as a threat to their position, as George describes her as jailbait warning Lennie, ’Don’t you even.. leave her be’. She is shown as being dangerous, as jail bait is a girl who is below the age of consent with whom sexual intercourse can constitute statutory rape. Even though, George is described near the Salinas River, as being inexperienced with women due to his unique relationship with Lennie, he already is able to sum up someone who he has only briefly met, as someone who will linger them into trouble. This was purposefully done by Steinbeck to foreshadow Lennie’s involvement with Curley’s wife in the barn; this affects our view on Curley’s wife, as we see her as the obstacle in Lennie and George path on success with their dreams and because we want Lennie and George to achieve this American Dream, we view her as evil.
However, some ranchers see her as the exact opposite, as Carlson states of how a “women should be at home where she belongs.”, she is seen as feeble and weak as she is seen as incapable to do anything related to physical strength. Steinbeck use a male gaze to present the fragmented nature of society the general sexist views men had of women in the 1930’s. She is being excluded from a place of physical work is indicative on the collective attitude men in the 1930’s had towards all women, as they are seen as the homemakers, they weren’t expected to do work, as he refers to ‘women’ not woman, also the word ‘should’ is a directive this shows the authority men had over women. The fact that Carlson says this devalues the worth of women, because just like George he is just a rancher and yet is given that power to diminishes the importance of women, Steinbeck does this to convey the view men had of women from the each status on the hierarchy on the ranch which reflects society, in unison men from all classes had the same view of women in the 1930’s.
Curley’s wife represents the epitome of prejudice against women in the novella, Steinbeck does this to reflect the true ideas of society in America in the 1930’s because her identity is seen as incapability on the ranch, just like Crooks. Throughout the novel as similar to Crooks wife, Curley’s Wife is not named. This highlights her lack of identity on the ranch and how she is viewed as the property of her husband. Also the fact that she is 'Curely's wife' objectifies her, and implies that her identity and her importance are formed due to her marriage to Curley. As a result of her insecurities due to the male dominated society on the ranch, she tries to combat her loneliness and isolation by resorting to violence. Her vicious attacks on Crooks to getting him “strung up on a tree” and the attacks on Lennie due to his mental disability show how loneliness can not only change a person, but destroy them. This mirrors the actions of her husband as his insecurities with his physical appearance, is what sparked up the fight between him and Lennie. Steinbeck does this to show how loneliness is the recipe for demise. All of the emotions Curley’s Wife encounters come as a result of the loneliness she feels, and these clearly represent of what a terrifying character she is.

Like many of the characters in the novel, Curley’s Wife also has a dream. She narrates her dream to be “in the movies.”, whilst Lennie is stroking ‘her hair’. Steinbeck presents Curley’s wife narrating her dream to Lennie whilst he strokes her ‘soft hair’, as a way of diminishing the ideas of the American Dream, as this suggests the ending of Lennie and Curley’s wife in that scene as because George foreshadows their union as being bad as he refers to her as someone that can lead them into jail if associated with her, ‘jailbait’. It ties in with Steinbeck’s view of the American dream as being just a dream, as it is impossible to achieve by the ‘outsiders of the ranch’. Many women during the 1930’s had a similar dream similar to this as they thought about the excitement that would follow, although even in Steinbeck’s cruel world it is made clear dreams are only dreams and the shatter of hope is clearly inevitable even for a delicate person such as Curley’s Wife.


One way in which Steinbeck presents Curley’s Wife is through the use of irony. Curley’s Wife demands her spot in the limelight however all she does is cast shadows and get negative attention “sunshine in the doorway was cut off.” This suggest that she is powerful in the way her presence affects other characters as her presence eliminates goodness and even nature, ‘sunshine’. Steinbeck does this to foreshadow and hint at the unhappy ending of her. She is unaware that her presence brings pain and cast shadows so it is ironic that when she dies the light leaves her, “the sun streaks were high on the wall by now.” This again implies her negative effect on the fate of the people who interact with her as there was no hope for Lennie, as the sun is far away. This goes against the American traditional ideas ‘behind every successful man is a woman’


In all, Curley’s Wife is important throughout the novel as she increases the scope of many of the key events and themes which occur. Steinbeck uses her as a vehicle at time to portray the women during the 1930’s. It is made clear she is threat to George and Lennie’s dream however also a victim of sexism and loneliness. Steinbeck makes it clear that companionship is a vital part for human happiness.
0
reply
Kalliope
Badges: 17
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#19
Report 10 years ago
#19
(Original post by Taliahart)
I'm taking my AQA GCSE in English Literature next week, and in preparation I wrote this 45 minute essay. I don't know too much about essay structure; I usually just write as it comes naturally. If anyone with experience in the play or essay writing could give me any tips (specific or general) I'd be unbelieveably grateful!


-------
Inspector Goole and Mr Birling have perhaps the most noticeably opposing views and philosophies of any two characters in the play. Priestley displays this through the ongoing conflict between the pair, and notably in their vastly contrasting speeches delivered separately in the play. In addition to the subtle details of their opposing views, this conflict successfully shows the contrasting philosophies of Birling and the Inspector.

As soon as they meet, Birling attempts to show his social superiority to the Inspector, boasting about his contacts in the police force. This highlights how social standing is very important to Birling and so, he assumes, is equally as important to everyone else. Couple this with his hints to Gerald early in the play that he is in line to “find his way into the next Honours list”, and the audience are shown how Birling feels that for one to be accepted, they must have privileges in society. This is not, however, a philosophy shared by the Inspector. Following Birling’s attempt at a threat (his claim that he plays golf with the chief constable)try to avoid parenthesis if you possibly can: writing fluently is a key discriminator between the top grades, the Inspector ‘dryly’ responds that “I don’t play golf”. His use of the word “don’t” shows it is out of choice that he doesn’t play golf, not needing to conform to society’s expectations. Maybe talk about the stage direction too - 'dryly' shows his wryly dismissive attitude towards Birling and his philosophy This can, of course, be viewed in the wider context of the novel, and the Inspector’s views of social responsibility. Explain this more - now it seems like a throwaway comment but it has potential to be sophisticated point.

Both Birling and Inspector Goole make speeches within the play, showing their contrastingphilosophies on this matter of social responsibility. Birling insists at the beginning of the play that “a man has to...look after himself and his own”. See language analysis higher in the thread - individualistic focus of repeated personal pronouns 'man' 'himself' 'his'This view is further evidenced by his reaction towards the workers who initiated the strike at his works. Tell us what this reaction was. You need to show the examiner rather than leave them to infer what you mean. Contrastingly, 'By contrast' sounds better the Inspector’s later speech is one of a moral, socialistic view that “we are responsible for one another”. Becauseboth of these speeches are the longest, most narrative pieces of text in the play, the contrast ismuch more evident.

The main difference between the philosophies of Birling and the Inspector, is that of social responsibility. Whilst the Inspector insists that we are “all members of one body”, Birling could not disagree more. This is evidenced not only in his initial, capitalist speech, but also in his refusal to accept any responsibility for the death of Eva Smith. He’s content to think that he was “quite justified” in discharging Eva from his works and not to dwell further on the subject. This would be a good place for more evidence/language analysisThis is shown to contrast with the Inspector, who throughout the play probes the characters – and audience- into believing that we are all “Intertwined”.

Throughout the play, the Inspector and Birling are displayed as opposites in looks, mannerisms, evidence?but most of all philosophies. The way that Priestley achieves this goes further than just their speeches and direct actions. By portraying the character of the Inspector as morally ‘right’, and the character of Birling as a ‘fool’ in general terms, it follows that their views and philosophies will contrast also. More evidence neededBy having Sheila and Eric side with the philosophy of the Inspector, this is shown as the philosophy for the future. Try rewording this slightlyBirling, on the other hand, is shown to be out-dated and stupid too informal for a GCSE essay, so that the Inspector’s socialist views ultimately triumph in the play. This last clause would have greater impact as its own sentence

-------------

If anyone answers, thank you so much!! x
Bearing in mind what people have already told you, I thought I'd go through what you wrote specifically rather than give generalised feedback. However, a couple of comments:
-You need more detailed analysis of language and structure to push it up to the higher grades. For structure, think possibly about how (unlike the other characters) neither Birling or the Inspector shift their philosophies by the end of the play. You don't need much, just an acknowledgement. You can cover form by making more explicit reference to stage directions.
-More evidence in a couple of places
-Try to see if you can manage to write say another 200-300 words (this should definitely be possible in the time) - while it's undeniably quality > quantity too little can be restrictive as it doesn't let you show the examiner everything you can do.

Hope this helps Generally very well done though!
0
reply
Kalliope
Badges: 17
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#20
Report 10 years ago
#20
(Original post by Stephanie8)
x
Sorry, I don't have enough experience with Mice and Men. Hope someone else can help you
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Year 12s - where are you at with making decisions about university?

I’ve chosen my course and my university (26)
27.08%
I’ve chosen my course and shortlisted some universities (31)
32.29%
I’ve chosen my course, but not any universities (10)
10.42%
I’ve chosen my university, but not my course (4)
4.17%
I’ve shortlisted some universities, but not my course (5)
5.21%
I’m starting to consider my university options (14)
14.58%
I haven’t started thinking about university yet (4)
4.17%
I’m not planning on going to university (2)
2.08%

Watched Threads

View All