bestofyou
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#1
Report Thread starter 10 years ago
#1
Would it be hard to get a job with a BEng? How much more limited would I be with the BEng?

Also, how hard/easy is it to switch between the two when you get to uni? In general of course as every uni is different.
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Smack
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#2
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#2
I got a job offer with just a BEng, and I know many other people on my course also got job offers for just a BEng, even with companies that said they only take MEng, but ultimately the MEng makes it easier to get chartered and there are many companies that only take MEng graduates.

Usually it's really easy to transfer between BEng and MEng since the courses are identical until at least the second year, and often right up until the final bachelors year where the BEng folk will graduate and the MEng folk will stay.
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bestofyou
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#3
Report Thread starter 10 years ago
#3
(Original post by Smack)
I got a job offer with just a BEng, and I know many other people on my course also got job offers for just a BEng, even with companies that said they only take MEng, but ultimately the MEng makes it easier to get chartered and there are many companies that only take MEng graduates.

Usually it's really easy to transfer between BEng and MEng since the courses are identical until at least the second year, and often right up until the final bachelors year where the BEng folk will graduate and the MEng folk will stay.
Is its importance really only in regards to engineering careers?

For example if I wanted to go into finance would it actually matter?

Also what job did you get? And what type of degree?
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Donald Duck
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#4
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#4
(Original post by bestofyou)
Is its importance really only in regards to engineering careers?

For example if I wanted to go into finance would it actually matter?

Also what job did you get? And what type of degree?
Up to some level an MEng is a certificate of intelligence (coupled with the university you attended), and a BEng is also a certificate of intelligence, but a 'less intelligent' one (though of course people do a BEng for other reasons as well, but there's a stigma attached).

Therefore though it depends who you apply to, an MEng will get you in anywhere a BEng does, but you can't go everywhere with a BEng you can with an MEng.
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Smack
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#5
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#5
(Original post by bestofyou)
Is its importance really only in regards to engineering careers?

For example if I wanted to go into finance would it actually matter?
I don't know anything about finance since it's not something I'm interested in.

Also what job did you get? And what type of degree?
Drilling engineer from mechanical engineering degree.
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bestofyou
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#6
Report Thread starter 10 years ago
#6
(Original post by Smack)
I don't know anything about finance since it's not something I'm interested in.



Drilling engineer from mechanical engineering degree.
can I be cheeky and ask what uni you went to and what is/was your starting salary? If you don't want to answer specifically feel free to put in a bracket e.g £20-25k

In general how hard is it to get an engineer related job in the UK today?


(Original post by Donald Duck)
Up to some level an MEng is a certificate of intelligence (coupled with the university you attended), and a BEng is also a certificate of intelligence, but a 'less intelligent' one (though of course people do a BEng for other reasons as well, but there's a stigma attached).

Therefore though it depends who you apply to, an MEng will get you in anywhere a BEng does, but you can't go everywhere with a BEng you can with an MEng.
If the course is accredited surely it doesn't matter so much about the institution?
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Smack
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#7
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#7
(Original post by bestofyou)
can I be cheeky and ask what uni you went to and what is/was your starting salary? If you don't want to answer specifically feel free to put in a bracket e.g £20-25k
I go to RGU in Aberdeen and the job offered £32,000 plus bonuses, rising to just over £52,000 after year one due to offshore allowance. I didn't take the job though because I was never fully interested in it and wasn't exactly the type of company I wanted to work for. It was also the only job I applied for and I would rather not commit myself to a job that I will have to be in for probably at least four years until I've properly explored all my avenues. I also want to do an MEng, primarily for personal reasons now that I've seen that many companies are quite happy hiring BEng graduates (I was also too late to apply to many places with just a BEng too).

Though I may very well regret that decision depending on how my exams went.

In general how hard is it to get an engineer related job in the UK today?
Very difficult to answer that because each sector is different. For example, F1 is almost impossible to enter, and construction is quite hard too I think. Oil & gas is much easier but maybe that's just because I live in the right area and go to a university that is heavily targeted by that industry.

Overall if you check out Unistats you'll see that at most universities a large amount of engineering graduates go onto careers in engineering. IT & telecommunications, laboratory work and technicians are probably the next most popular destinations.

You can massively increase your chances by getting work experience and participating in relevant or worthwhile (e.g. social secretary of drinking society doesn't count) extra curriculars.

But there are more engineering graduates than places on engineering graduate schemes.
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bestofyou
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#8
Report Thread starter 10 years ago
#8
(Original post by Smack)
I go to RGU in Aberdeen and the job offered £32,000 plus bonuses, rising to just over £52,000 after year one due to offshore allowance. I didn't take the job though because I was never fully interested in it and wasn't exactly the type of company I wanted to work for. It was also the only job I applied for and I would rather not commit myself to a job that I will have to be in for probably at least four years until I've properly explored all my avenues. I also want to do an MEng, primarily for personal reasons now that I've seen that many companies are quite happy hiring BEng graduates (I was also too late to apply to many places with just a BEng too).

Though I may very well regret that decision depending on how my exams went.



Very difficult to answer that because each sector is different. For example, F1 is almost impossible to enter, and construction is quite hard too I think. Oil & gas is much easier but maybe that's just because I live in the right area and go to a university that is heavily targeted by that industry.

Overall if you check out Unistats you'll see that at most universities a large amount of engineering graduates go onto careers in engineering. IT & telecommunications, laboratory work and technicians are probably the next most popular destinations.

You can massively increase your chances by getting work experience and participating in relevant or worthwhile (e.g. social secretary of drinking society doesn't count) extra curriculars.

But there are more engineering graduates than places on engineering graduate schemes.
thanks for the info

As for the last line, I'd say today that is true for all graduates:graduate schemes, the exception maybe medicine/related which seems to send most graduates straight into employment.

Any idea about working abroad?
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Smack
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#9
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#9
(Original post by bestofyou)
thanks for the info

As for the last line, I'd say today that is true for all graduates:graduate schemes, the exception maybe medicine/related which seems to send most graduates straight into employment.

Any idea about working abroad?
Many graduate schemes I've been looking at involved working abroad (and indeed the job I was offered was mainly working abroad), with the possibility of relocating.
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Donald Duck
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#10
Report 10 years ago
#10
(Original post by bestofyou)
If the course is accredited surely it doesn't matter so much about the institution?
If you're going for the certificate of intelligence option, because you don't wanna go into engineering, it does. If you want to be an engineer, the certification is the main point and therefore it does not.
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a10
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#11
Report 9 years ago
#11
(Original post by Smack)
I go to RGU in Aberdeen and the job offered £32,000 plus bonuses, rising to just over £52,000 after year one due to offshore allowance. I didn't take the job though because I was never fully interested in it and wasn't exactly the type of company I wanted to work for. It was also the only job I applied for and I would rather not commit myself to a job that I will have to be in for probably at least four years until I've properly explored all my avenues. I also want to do an MEng, primarily for personal reasons now that I've seen that many companies are quite happy hiring BEng graduates (I was also too late to apply to many places with just a BEng too).

Though I may very well regret that decision depending on how my exams went.



Very difficult to answer that because each sector is different. For example, F1 is almost impossible to enter, and construction is quite hard too I think. Oil & gas is much easier but maybe that's just because I live in the right area and go to a university that is heavily targeted by that industry.

Overall if you check out Unistats you'll see that at most universities a large amount of engineering graduates go onto careers in engineering. IT & telecommunications, laboratory work and technicians are probably the next most popular destinations.

You can massively increase your chances by getting work experience and participating in relevant or worthwhile (e.g. social secretary of drinking society doesn't count) extra curriculars.

But there are more engineering graduates than places on engineering graduate schemes.
is there any difference between MEng and MEng(Hons)
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Smack
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#12
Report 9 years ago
#12
(Original post by a10)
is there any difference between MEng and MEng(Hons)
No, not apart from the name.

Edit: It seems to be mainly Scottish universities calling theirs just MEng and English ones calling theirs MEng(Hons).
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username306617
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#13
Report 9 years ago
#13
(Original post by bestofyou)
Would it be hard to get a job with a BEng? How much more limited would I be with the BEng?

Also, how hard/easy is it to switch between the two when you get to uni? In general of course as every uni is different.
I think later in your career you will be more limited with the BEng, I was looking at rail engineering jobs, and they were only interested in MEng or chartered engineers, however this same company took on a BEng for their bus engineering grad scheme this year.
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pheonix254
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#14
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#14
(Original post by Smack)
No, not apart from the name.

Edit: It seems to be mainly Scottish universities calling theirs just MEng and English ones calling theirs MEng(Hons).
There is a difference between an "honours" degree and an "ordinary" degree. Generally, you'll get an ordinary degree if you fail to get a 3rd but still complete the course, or have too many re-takes. It's usually a given that any course, nowadays, is an honours degree, as far as I'm aware. A lot of people don't bother with the (Hons) in their signatures and titles, on documents/business cards/TSR even though they have honours degrees.

And to further complicate matters, different countries have different rules/regulations on degree classifications.

Wikipedia is the fountain of all knowledge:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bachelo...United_Kingdom

Stu Haynes MEng(Hons)
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username306617
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#15
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#15
(Original post by pheonix254)
There is a difference between an "honours" degree and an "ordinary" degree. Generally, you'll get an ordinary degree if you fail to get a 3rd but still complete the course, or have too many re-takes. It's usually a given that any course, nowadays, is an honours degree, as far as I'm aware. A lot of people don't bother with the (Hons) in their signatures and titles, on documents/business cards/TSR even though they have honours degrees.

And to further complicate matters, different countries have different rules/regulations on degree classifications.

Wikipedia is the fountain of all knowledge:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bachelo...United_Kingdom

Stu Haynes MEng(Hons)
Also if you leave after 3rd year (at a Scottish uni) you get an ordinary degree ie a BEng.
Then 4th year BEng(Hons)and 5th year MEng(Hons).
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Smack
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#16
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#16
(Original post by pheonix254)
There is a difference between an "honours" degree and an "ordinary" degree. Generally, you'll get an ordinary degree if you fail to get a 3rd but still complete the course, or have too many re-takes. It's usually a given that any course, nowadays, is an honours degree, as far as I'm aware. A lot of people don't bother with the (Hons) in their signatures and titles, on documents/business cards/TSR even though they have honours degrees.

And to further complicate matters, different countries have different rules/regulations on degree classifications.

Wikipedia is the fountain of all knowledge:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bachelo...United_Kingdom

Stu Haynes MEng(Hons)
Yes, but a lot of Scottish universities don't award their MEng degrees with honours and as such don't award 1sts, 2:1s etc., instead using postgraduate classifications such as Merit, Pass, Distinction etc.

There is already a difference between an ordinary degree in Scotland and England: in Scotland an ordinary degree is awarded to people who complete their third of study but not their honours i.e. fourth year.
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Foghorn Leghorn
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#17
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#17
(Original post by Smack)
Yes, but a lot of Scottish universities don't award their MEng degrees with honours and as such don't award 1sts, 2:1s etc., instead using postgraduate classifications such as Merit, Pass, Distinction etc.

There is already a difference between an ordinary degree in Scotland and England: in Scotland an ordinary degree is awarded to people who complete their third of study but not their honours i.e. fourth year.
Not sure what you mean here.

In england a BEng will be an Hons degree. All 3 year degrees in england are hons degrees. You can also do a 4 year MEng which is a hons degree and a masters combined into one.
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imhiya
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#18
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#18
(Original post by Popppppy)
Also if you leave after 3rd year (at a Scottish uni) you get an ordinary degree ie a BEng.
Then 4th year BEng(Hons)and 5th year MEng(Hons).
OMG a girl in Engineering! :O Your like a shiny pokemon.

I jokes! But this thread has a lot of good information relating to differences between MEng and BEng.

Generally it's MEng lets you progress further (Charted status) and gives more opportunity in the field you do your MEng. Whereas you can be fine with just an BEng. There's not much reason other than cost not to do the MEng unless you already got the job you wanted through a BEng.
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Smack
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#19
Report 9 years ago
#19
(Original post by Foghorn Leghorn)
Not sure what you mean here.

In england a BEng will be an Hons degree. All 3 year degrees in england are hons degrees. You can also do a 4 year MEng which is a hons degree and a masters combined into one.
Yes but in Scotland the MEng is often awarded without honours, and as such uses the masters classification.
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Foghorn Leghorn
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#20
Report 9 years ago
#20
(Original post by Smack)
Yes but in Scotland the MEng is often awarded without honours, and as such uses the masters classification.
Yeah i just look it up and apparenlty you're right. I looked on the IET website and a lot of people are saying a BEng (hons) + MSc, is arguably better than a MEng as there are more credits with a BEng Hons + MSc = 540 credits and an MEng = 480.

Although apparenlty it doesn't matter in the uk as both will get you chartership, one of the commenters said outside the UK having an MEng may be considered to fall short of a full post grad qualificaiton and just be looked upon as an undergrad with post grad components. I actually didn't realise an MEng had less credits. :dontknow:
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