laprenti
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I was wondering, if the study of architecture (up to perhaps bachelor level) would benefit my concept art skills, which is a field I would like to get into. I know there are quite a few architects who go on to be concept artists, and technical drawing/model making are good skills, but I don't want to study something of no benefit. Essentially, I have a Cal Newport mindset of 'Love/passion grows'. I'm really not very interested in buildings, I've never seen a building (outside of futuristic/fantasy concept art) and thought it looked beautiful/interesting/satisfying in a design sense. But passion is said to develop when you become skilled in something, so maybe I will finally acquire an appreciation for architecture and an overall better design sense, which right now I feel that I'm lacking.
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GormlessWonder
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It would probably benefit you, especially the richness of knowing how you should arrange space in context, but the majority of our time on this course is spent doing something so specific and draining that you're best off taking a more direct route that will give you a better portfolio and follow your current passions. Take a year out and work in the field is my advice.
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xBillyBrownx
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I'm currently studying architecture and would like to become a concept architect in the future. It would definitely help you to study architecture, probably more than studying just art because of the spatial and contextual aspects involved. I too wasn't completely passionate about architecture when I first decided to study it (although I definitely liked and was interested in it), but I'm now extremely passionate about it and fascinated by what it can do and be. But yes you should really now that architecture requires a lot of detail and meticulous drawings that are pretty tedious and often feel completely irrelevant so now that you will definitely have to work far beyond the conceptual levels of design.
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laprenti
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(Original post by GormlessWonder)
It would probably benefit you, especially the richness of knowing how you should arrange space in context, but the majority of our time on this course is spent doing something so specific and draining that you're best off taking a more direct route that will give you a better portfolio and follow your current passions. Take a year out and work in the field is my advice.
Yeah I'm already definitely taking at least a gap year, could develop into a few, I didn't apply to uni.

If by direct route you mean going on some form of representational art/illustration course, I consider that a waste of money as everything I can learn/gain (like networking and feedback on pieces and technique) I can get outside of formal education and for free, so personally I would like to study something that can only be studied at uni and nowhere else.

but the majority of our time on this course is spent doing something so specific and draining
That's interesting, I guess there are pros and cons

I'm currently studying architecture and would like to become a concept architect in the future. It would definitely help you to study architecture, probably more than studying just art because of the spatial and contextual aspects involved. I too wasn't completely passionate about architecture when I first decided to study it (although I definitely liked and was interested in it), but I'm now extremely passionate about it and fascinated by what it can do and be. But yes you should really now that architecture requires a lot of detail and meticulous drawings that are pretty tedious and often feel completely irrelevant so now that you will definitely have to work far beyond the conceptual levels of design.
Thanks for the advice. Do you feel that the useful parts of the architecture curriculum could be picked up by a few books/online lectures and some self study or is it something that can only be taught with the resources available at a university, thus making it worth going through the irrelevant, specific stuff?
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abracadabra99
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I've just finished my degree in animation (mostly CG animation) and I'm looking to go down a pre-production art route... storyboarding, concept art, illustration, etc. There was a considerable amount of observational drawing/painting in the curriculum, and we were encouraged (read: expected) to practise and improve confidence in representational art outside of the programme. It was directly relevant, of course.


I understand your apprehension towards applying for a degree-focused art course, though it wouldn't necessarily be a waste of money. There's a lot to gain. Contrary from what many naysayers like to spout all the time, a lot of academic value can be found in some programmes (some, not all), and you'll be expected to tackle issues and consider ideas from other fields. Philosophy and ethics, music, biology, physics, geometry and literature are all extremely likely to inspire or have an effect on the content you produce.


The networking aspect, of course, is made far easier by going to university. Not only will you be working with a cohort of like-minded (sometimes not :P) students and lecturers/instructors for a number of years, but you'll also have access to opportunities that are often exclusive to university departments. Discounts to festivals, conventions and other industry events are sometimes given to students, and are even hosted on campuses from time to time.



As a concept artist, you'll be expected to be able to draw everything and anything. The way the industry is now, though, your work will be environment-centric or prop-centric, so architecture's a good choice, as is industrial design or product design. If you want to specialize as a character concept artist, however, you'll likely become an illustrator as well (loooooooooads more character work there), and from there it's probably evident which course you should consider.


Hope this helps.
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laprenti
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Thanks for your suggestions!

I understand your point but, surely all those other supplementary ideas from other fields can be studied individually? I myself have an interest in physics/maths/biology/history, and it certainly inspires my work, I don't think it's necessary to get that from a course.

Hmm, yeah? But networking these days can be easily be found online and through a few artist friends. As for similar minded people, I'm joining a small group of professionals and students in London who go to figure drawing every Friday and sketch together at a nando's once a week, and there's also the vaaaast online CG community of students, professionals and teachers who are willing to help and give you feedback, for free. To be honest I don't think it's worth paying £9000 a year for a few discounts and some exclusive opportunities

This is an interesting thread on cghub on 'self taught vs. degree', including a few posts from some great artists (Alex Solodnik of redbeardead.com!) And a majority of them agree that self taught is the better option for the most part

http://cghub.com/forum/showthread.php?t=44

That's interesting, I've never considered specializing, I'm an all rounder type of person
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abracadabra99
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It really depends on how you want to approach your career - academically or vocationally.


I skimmed through the CGHub thread, and yeah, for the most part, the posters are on the ball. You need drive and self-motivation, and you need to be able to learn autonomously. But that doesn't mean a structured curriculum in an accredited institution is useless. You can be both self-taught and instructed. In university, you have to do both, otherwise you will remain, at best, mediocre.

Concerning the study of other fields, reading up on certain subjects for personal interest really isn't the same as having your research evaluated and assessed by an academic tutor. You'll be able to receive feedback throughout the process, and it's always refreshing to have that kind of material alongside practical modules. Critical thinking and contextual knowledge is almost as important as your technical skill, but the acknowledgement of that differs case by case.

But really, it all depends on whether you actually want to go to university or not, and what you specifically want to specialize in. If you're going to uni for the sake of learning, it's not a waste of money. Sounds a little trivial since I paid three times less than that, but if you're academically inclined then you should cherish the experience.


By the way, that London sketch group sounds really interesting! I'm moving back down next week and it would be great to meet up with artists down there... on a personal, offline basis it's pretty much been Yorkshire for me at the moment since that's where I studied.
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laprenti
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I agree it's not useless, but not necessary or worth the money, in my opinion

...isn't the same as having your research evaluated and assessed by an academic tutor. You'll be able to receive feedback throughout the process, and it's always refreshing to have that kind of material alongside practical modules.
I'm not quite sure what you mean by that, what kind of assessment, could you elaborate?

Sure, I want to go to uni for the sake of learning, but for me to accept such debt I want something valuable that I can't get by myself, the academic experience alone for me isn't enough. Actually, I'm considering applying to a physics degree, simply for the sake of studying physics. Physics, unlike art, requires experienced mentors and equipment not accessible to an individual

Ah, well there's a sketchmeet/figure drawing on Fridays at the Hesketh Hubbard society at the Mall Galleries: http://www.mallgalleries.org.uk/inde...id=120&subid=2 You have to pay for membership though (although it's not expensive compared to other figure drawing sessions). You have to show your portfolio to gain membership but they approve any portfolio as long as it shows the bare minimum of skill, they don't really mind. The guys from conceptart.org usually meet up there. There's also the weekly (I'm not sure though since I haven't checked in a long while) sketchmeets around London, either somewhere like nando's or costa coffee, occasionally exhibits and museums, it's mostly concept artists/illustrators. I just emailed one of them to know what's going on now, no reply yet. There's also figure drawing at LARA (London Atelier of representational art) on wednesday evenings, with a meetup in a pub around the corner beforehand, apparently. It's £8 a session (more expensive then the Mall Galleries)

Bah, it's been such a long time since I've drawn or gone to an exhibition, I'm sure my skills are have rotted away completely, although luckily I have a year in which to draw non stop
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abracadabra99
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If you take a module that covers contextual ideas and related subjects, like anatomy or art history, you'll most likely have to write essays and reports to fulfill the module's assessment criteria. Since it takes place within an academic setting, you'll have your findings formally assessed by your lecturer or instructor, and you should be able to receive feedback on your work right from the briefing up until the time of submission.


But it's a moot point. XD Pick what interests you. The only thing that matters in the end is your portfolio. A degree doesn't hurt, however, and in any case, whatever you learn will have a profound impact on your work (if you keep drawing, of course). I'd only recommend an art course because you'll be spending several dedicated hours on developing your technique and observational skill.

Thanks for the info on the sketchmeets. Will definitely look in to that.
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Georgios Grigo
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Hello to everyone,

I m a third year student in architecture and Im fascinated with it. I definitely want to be an architect !! Recently I discover the concept artist and I was really interested with the level in drawing ! I was wondering do you want that if the studies of concept art would help me more in architecture? Do you thing that an architect who is also a concept artist is better?
Thank you
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