Which is better - Electrical Eng. or Electronic Eng.? Watch

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bestofyou
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or Electrical and Electronic eng.?
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Foghorn Leghorn
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I think i'm correct in saying electronics is in someways a sub catagory of electrical engineering. Certainly electrical seems to be the more traditional side (i'm sure people will argue the opposite though ). The feeling I get is electrical has more job prospects, however neither is necessarily "better". Also it seems that since renewables have became the fashion lately, electrical engineering courses are getting more and more popular. Saying that though there's a reason why most unis now offer electrical and electronic engineering as one degree rather than two seperate.
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chelseafan
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, im fairly interested in this degree. What are the career prospects like and hows the salary? Also my practical skills are quite poor, how much practical work is involed in an Electrical/Electronic engineering degree. Sorry for going off topic.
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Foghorn Leghorn
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(Original post by chelseafan)
, im fairly interested in this degree. What are the career prospects like and hows the salary? Also my practical skills are quite poor, how much practical work is involed in an Electrical/Electronic engineering degree. Sorry for going off topic.
TBH any degree in engineering gives you good prospects and good potential earnings, given it's a professional degree and the world always needs engineers.

So far I've only studied electrical engineering and done a little bit of electronics. In electrical you don't do that much practicle, there's some but not a whole load. It's more maths and engineering priciples and learning things like power systems, electrical priciples, machine priciples, 3 phase systems, circuits, programming, digital elecrtonics, plcs, electromaganatism etc, etc.... Personally I find it really enjoyable but there's a lot of theory. Electronics has slightly less theory and the subjects you learn are slightly different, but there is much more practicle. A lot of soldering circuit boards and chips.

If you go for an electrical and electronic degree (eee), you get the best of both worlds. There's also the option of electrical and mechanical engineering (eme) if you're not that interested in electronics. Then there's the more singular subject engineering degrees like power systems engineering or micro-electronics. By singular subject I mean they focus on one particular area of an eee degree. For example power systems engineering is a subject you will learn in electrical engineering, but it will only count for 2 or 3 modules out of the whole degree, where as a power system engineering degree is purely focused around power systems engineering. These kind of degrees can be great if you are absolutely certain you want to go into that area, however they could hinder you if you apply for a job outside that area, but even then engineers tend to be fairly adaptable.
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bestofyou
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(Original post by Foghorn Leghorn)
TBH any degree in engineering gives you good prospects and good potential earnings, given it's a professional degree and the world always needs engineers.

So far I've only studied electrical engineering and done a little bit of electronics. In electrical you don't do that much practicle, there's some but not a whole load. It's more maths and engineering priciples and learning things like power systems, electrical priciples, machine priciples, 3 phase systems, circuits, programming, digital elecrtonics, plcs, electromaganatism etc, etc.... Personally I find it really enjoyable but there's a lot of theory. Electronics has slightly less theory and the subjects you learn are slightly different, but there is much more practicle. A lot of soldering circuit boards and chips.

If you go for an electrical and electronic degree (eee), you get the best of both worlds. There's also the option of electrical and mechanical engineering (eme) if you're not that interested in electronics. Then there's the more singular subject engineering degrees like power systems engineering or micro-electronics. By singular subject I mean they focus on one particular area of an eee degree. For example power systems engineering is a subject you will learn in electrical engineering, but it will only count for 2 or 3 modules out of the whole degree, where as a power system engineering degree is purely focused around power systems engineering. These kind of degrees can be great if you are absolutely certain you want to go into that area, however they could hinder you if you apply for a job outside that area, but even then engineers tend to be fairly adaptable.
slightly off topic, but say you are talking with a group of engineering students and you are asking what they study. Do they reply I'm doing EEE or do they say electrical and electronical engineering? Just wondering, not that it really matters

I'm wanting to go into renewable energy and was looking at electrical. Though is it possible to go into renewable energy with an electronic eng. degree? no?
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Foghorn Leghorn
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(Original post by bestofyou)
slightly off topic, but say you are talking with a group of engineering students and you are asking what they study. Do they reply I'm doing EEE or do they say electrical and electronical engineering? Just wondering, not that it really matters
Depends, if they are talking to other engineering students I've heard people just say 'triple E' however for everyone else they will say electronic and electrical engineering, or even just electrical engineering.


I'm wanting to go into renewable energy and was looking at electrical. Though is it possible to go into renewable energy with an electronic eng. degree? no?
Definitely, electrical is one of the main degrees the renewables industry are looking for. Again tbh any engineering degree will get you into renewables because they need them all from civil engineers to design and maintain the infrastructure of the stations to electrical engineering for power generation and distribution. But electrical seems to be 'the one'.

There's also a few universities that now offer renewable energy engineering which is similar to electrical but focuses specifically on renewables. However like I said unless you are certain you want to go into renewables then it's best just sticking to EEE or EME.
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bestofyou
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(Original post by Foghorn Leghorn)
Depends, if they are talking to other engineering students I've heard people just say 'triple E' however for everyone else they will say electronic and electrical engineering, or even just electrical engineering.




Definitely, electrical is one of the main degrees the renewables industry are looking for. Again tbh any engineering degree will get you into renewables because they need them all from civil engineers to design and maintain the infrastructure of the stations to electrical engineering for power generation and distribution. But electrical seems to be 'the one'.

There's also a few universities that now offer renewable energy engineering which is similar to electrical but focuses specifically on renewables. However like I said unless you are certain you want to go into renewables then it's best just sticking to EEE or EME.
I'm talking about just a straight electronic eng. though? Not EEE or straight electrical. I know the Electronic is a sub-cat. of electrical, but (I could be very wrong) I always assumed electronic was more related to lower voltage electrics, mobile phones, mp3s etc whereas if you wanted to work with say wind turbines an electronic eng. would be of little relevance?

Yeah I diffenatly don't want to go into something to specific like a Renewable eng. degree. This is why im not sure about an electronic straight degree.
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Foghorn Leghorn
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(Original post by bestofyou)
I'm talking about just a straight electronic eng. though? Not EEE or straight electrical. I know the Electronic is a sub-cat. of electrical, but (I could be very wrong) I always assumed electronic was more related to lower voltage electrics, mobile phones, mp3s etc whereas if you wanted to work with say wind turbines an electronic eng. would be of little relevance?
Yes, electronics mainly focus on the things you sugested, but there is plenty of other subjects in there to do with electrical and even some mechanical enginering.

And funnily enough actually electronics would be very useful in renewables. For example wind turbine energy generation is transmited differently from your typical fossil feul power generation. Because wind turbines generate electricity dependent on the speed of the wind it's hard to control frequency and voltage output that means the power cannot be directly fed to the national grid. First the power has to be rectified to DC and the voltage has to be regulated, it is then transmitted and rectified back to pseudo AC and fed to the consumer. That's where the electronics engineers come in because if there's one thing electronic engineers know about it's semi-conductors and rectification. You'd have no problem getting a job.

But to be brutally honest you are best going for an EEE degree rather than a pure electronics degree as it's the most sought after and you learn both subjects. That's why most unis only offer EEE rather than pure electrical or pure electronics.
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Mechie
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(Original post by Foghorn Leghorn)
So far I've only studied electrical engineering and done a little bit of electronics. In electrical you don't do that much practicle, there's some but not a whole load. It's more maths and engineering priciples and learning things like power systems, electrical priciples, machine priciples, 3 phase systems, circuits, programming, digital elecrtonics, plcs, electromaganatism etc, etc.... Personally I find it really enjoyable but there's a lot of theory. Electronics has slightly less theory and the subjects you learn are slightly different, but there is much more practicle. A lot of soldering circuit boards and chips.
That sounds incredibly similar to my HNC, minus the programming :lol:

I much prefer electrical, which is pretty much what Foghorn said. Electronics is more about small devices, such as diodes, thyristors, triacs etc, so it's small devices and circuit boards, like the sort that run your computer. Electrical is bigger things, such as motors, transformers, power systems (like the national grid etc).
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Foghorn Leghorn
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(Original post by davidmarsh01)
That sounds incredibly similar to my HNC, minus the programming :lol:

I much prefer electrical, which is pretty much what Foghorn said. Electronics is more about small devices, such as diodes, thyristors, triacs etc, so it's small devices and circuit boards, like the sort that run your computer. Electrical is bigger things, such as motors, transformers, power systems (like the national grid etc).
Yeah well an HNC is basically the same as one year of an electrical degree. You learn exactly the same stuff.
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(Original post by Foghorn Leghorn)
Yeah well an HNC is basically the same as one year of an electrical degree. You learn exactly the same stuff.
What university do you study at?
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bestofyou
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(Original post by Foghorn Leghorn)
Yes, electronics mainly focus on the things you sugested, but there is plenty of other subjects in there to do with electrical and even some mechanical enginering.

And funnily enough actually electronics would be very useful in renewables. For example wind turbine energy generation is transmited differently from your typical fossil feul power generation. Because wind turbines generate electricity dependent on the speed of the wind it's hard to control frequency and voltage output that means the power cannot be directly fed to the national grid. First the power has to be rectified to DC and the voltage has to be regulated, it is then transmitted and rectified back to pseudo AC and fed to the consumer. That's where the electronics engineers come in because if there's one thing electronic engineers know about it's semi-conductors and rectification. You'd have no problem getting a job.

But to be brutally honest you are best going for an EEE degree rather than a pure electronics degree as it's the most sought after and you learn both subjects. That's why most unis only offer EEE rather than pure electrical or pure electronics.
thanks for the info.

Yeah I agree about going for EEE which is my preferred choice, it is just I am applying (late entry) for foundation courses as I didn't do any science a-levels and now want to change. Only found out about these foundation courses last week so I have one EEE, one electric and one general foundation with the possiblity of anything afterwards, however there are two (QMUL/York) which are both are both Electronic which isn't exactly what I want but I would be tempted to take it instead of doing 2 Alevels or an access course here next year.
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Foghorn Leghorn
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(Original post by davidmarsh01)
What university do you study at?
At the moment I'm at caley.
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EdwardCurrent
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There's only one way to find out...
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bestofyou
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(Original post by Foghorn Leghorn)
At the moment I'm at caley.
glasgow?
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Foghorn Leghorn
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(Original post by bestofyou)
glasgow?
Yeah sorry glasgow caledonian university.
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man111111
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(Original post by Foghorn Leghorn)
Yes, electronics mainly focus on the things you sugested, but there is plenty of other subjects in there to do with electrical and even some mechanical enginering.

And funnily enough actually electronics would be very useful in renewables. For example wind turbine energy generation is transmited differently from your typical fossil feul power generation. Because wind turbines generate electricity dependent on the speed of the wind it's hard to control frequency and voltage output that means the power cannot be directly fed to the national grid. First the power has to be rectified to DC and the voltage has to be regulated, it is then transmitted and rectified back to pseudo AC and fed to the consumer. That's where the electronics engineers come in because if there's one thing electronic engineers know about it's semi-conductors and rectification. You'd have no problem getting a job.

But to be brutally honest you are best going for an EEE degree rather than a pure electronics degree as it's the most sought after and you learn both subjects. That's why most unis only offer EEE rather than pure electrical or pure electronics.
Hi is it true that an electrical and electronic engineer can't fix a tv, laptop, electrical generator...
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Doones
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(Original post by man111111)
Hi is it true that an electrical and electronic engineer can't fix a tv, laptop, electrical generator...
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