OCR F215, Urgent help Watch

bahjat93
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Does some1 know any where, were i can find CONCISE notes on the whole topic .
A video that could sum up the whole topic would be better. I just cant be asked to revise for biology any more :mad:
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bahjat93
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:bump:
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MyselfEtAl
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(Original post by bahjat93)
:bump:

(Original post by bahjat93)
Does some1 know any where, were i can find CONCISE notes on the whole topic .
A video that could sum up the whole topic would be better. I just cant be asked to revise for biology any more :mad:
http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=1296764

Enjoy.
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bahjat93
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I've got these notes, they are very good but not very concise lol :'(
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emmaarr
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I have my own notes which I have typed up, if you would like them, I'd by happy to email them to you? But they are quite lengthy. Otherwise have a look on getrevising.com- there are lots of notes and links to video etc. on there.


This was posted from The Student Room's iPhone/iPad App
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SnakehipsTTC
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(Original post by bahjat93)
I've got these notes, they are very good but not very concise lol :'(
You can't expect people to do the revision for you, grab a concise textbook, and make your own concise notes.
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bahjat93
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(Original post by dmccririck)
You can't expect people to do the revision for you, grab a concise textbook, and make your own concise notes.
The exams on Friday and i have 2 exams prior to that exam .
People are so lazy now a days, they only look out for themselves :/. No1 is thinking about any1 but themselves!
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SnakehipsTTC
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(Original post by bahjat93)
The exams on Friday and i have 2 exams prior to that exam .
People are so lazy now a days, they only look out for themselves :/. No1 is thinking about any1 but themselves!
Same, I have 3 exams prior to this one.

I made a list of all the topics that haven't come up on any of the past papers, and revising in detail those topics, and relying that I have enough knowledge on all the other topics from doing the past papers.
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MyselfEtAl
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(Original post by dmccririck)
Same, I have 3 exams prior to this one.

I made a list of all the topics that haven't come up on any of the past papers, and revising in detail those topics, and relying that I have enough knowledge on all the other topics from doing the past papers.
Could I have a copy of that list?
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bex.13
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(Original post by bahjat93)
Does some1 know any where, were i can find CONCISE notes on the whole topic .
A video that could sum up the whole topic would be better. I just cant be asked to revise for biology any more :mad:
We are all in the same boat, man up like the rest of us and do it yourself!
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SnakehipsTTC
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(Original post by MyselfEtAl)
Could I have a copy of that list?
• explain the meaning of the term genetic code;
• explain how mutations can have beneficial, neutral or harmful effects on the way a protein functions;
• state that cyclic AMP activates proteins by altering their three-dimensional structure;

• describe, with the aid of diagrams and photographs, the behaviour of chromosomes during meiosis, and the associated behaviour of the nuclear envelope, cell membrane and centrioles. (Names of the main stages are expected, but not the subdivisions of prophase);
• explain the terms allele, locus, phenotype, genotype, dominant, codominant and recessive;
• explain the terms linkage and crossing-over;
• explain how meiosis and fertilisation can lead to variation through the independent assortment of alleles;
• use genetic diagrams to solve problems involving sex linkage and codominance;
• describe the differences between continuous and discontinuous variation;
• explain the basis of continuous and discontinuous variation by reference to the number of genes which influence the variation;
• explain why variation is essential in selection
• explain, with examples, how environmental factors can act as stabilising or evolutionary forces of natural selection;
• explain how genetic drift can cause large changes in small populations;

• outline the differences between reproductive and non-reproductive cloning;
• describe how artificial clones of animals can be produced;
• discuss the advantages and disadvantages of cloning animals.

• explain why microorganisms are often used in biotechnological processes;
• describe, with the aid of diagrams, and explain the standard growth curve of a microorganism in a closed culture;
• describe how enzymes can be immobilised;



• outline the steps involved in sequencing the genome of an organism;
• outline how gene sequencing allows for genome-wide comparisons between individuals and between species;
• define the term recombinant DNA;
• describe how DNA probes can be used to identify fragments containing specific sequences;
• state other vectors into which fragments of DNA may be incorporated;
• explain how plasmids may be taken up by bacterial cells in order to produce a transgenic microorganism that can express a desired gene product;
• describe the advantage to microorganisms of the capacity to take up plasmid DNA from the environment;
• outline how genetic markers in plasmids can be used to identify the bacteria that have taken up a recombinant plasmid;
• outline the process involved in the genetic engineering of bacteria to produce human insulin;
• outline how animals can be genetically engineered for xenotransplantation;
• explain the term gene therapy;
• discuss the ethical concerns raised by the genetic manipulation of animals (including humans), plants and microorganisms.

• state that ecosystems are dynamic systems;
• define the terms biotic factor and abiotic factor
• explain how human activities can manipulate the flow of energy through ecosystems;
• describe one example of primary succession resulting in a climax community
• explain that conservation is a dynamic process involving management and reclamation;
• outline, with examples, the effects of human activities on the animal and plant populations in the Galapagos Islands.


• explain how plant responses to environmental changes are co-ordinated by hormones, with reference to responding to changes in light direction;
• discuss why animals need to respond to their environment;
• describe the role of the brain and nervous system in the co-ordination of muscular movement;
• describe how co-ordinated movement requires the action of skeletal muscles about joints, with reference to the movement of the elbow joint;
• explain, with the aid of diagrams and photographs, the sliding filament model of muscular contraction;
• outline the role of ATP in muscular contraction, and how the supply of ATP is maintained in muscles;
• state that responses to environmental stimuli in mammals are co-ordinated by nervous and endocrine systems;
• describe escape reflexes, taxes and kineses as examples of genetically-determined innate behaviours;

All the above are the specification points that have not yet come up.
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MyselfEtAl
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(Original post by dmccririck)
• explain the meaning of the term genetic code;
• explain how mutations can have beneficial, neutral or harmful effects on the way a protein functions;
• state that cyclic AMP activates proteins by altering their three-dimensional structure;

• describe, with the aid of diagrams and photographs, the behaviour of chromosomes during meiosis, and the associated behaviour of the nuclear envelope, cell membrane and centrioles. (Names of the main stages are expected, but not the subdivisions of prophase);
• explain the terms allele, locus, phenotype, genotype, dominant, codominant and recessive;
• explain the terms linkage and crossing-over;
• explain how meiosis and fertilisation can lead to variation through the independent assortment of alleles;
• use genetic diagrams to solve problems involving sex linkage and codominance;
• describe the differences between continuous and discontinuous variation;
• explain the basis of continuous and discontinuous variation by reference to the number of genes which influence the variation;
• explain why variation is essential in selection
• explain, with examples, how environmental factors can act as stabilising or evolutionary forces of natural selection;
• explain how genetic drift can cause large changes in small populations;

• outline the differences between reproductive and non-reproductive cloning;
• describe how artificial clones of animals can be produced;
• discuss the advantages and disadvantages of cloning animals.

• explain why microorganisms are often used in biotechnological processes;
• describe, with the aid of diagrams, and explain the standard growth curve of a microorganism in a closed culture;
• describe how enzymes can be immobilised;



• outline the steps involved in sequencing the genome of an organism;
• outline how gene sequencing allows for genome-wide comparisons between individuals and between species;
• define the term recombinant DNA;
• describe how DNA probes can be used to identify fragments containing specific sequences;
• state other vectors into which fragments of DNA may be incorporated;
• explain how plasmids may be taken up by bacterial cells in order to produce a transgenic microorganism that can express a desired gene product;
• describe the advantage to microorganisms of the capacity to take up plasmid DNA from the environment;
• outline how genetic markers in plasmids can be used to identify the bacteria that have taken up a recombinant plasmid;
• outline the process involved in the genetic engineering of bacteria to produce human insulin;
• outline how animals can be genetically engineered for xenotransplantation;
• explain the term gene therapy;
• discuss the ethical concerns raised by the genetic manipulation of animals (including humans), plants and microorganisms.

• state that ecosystems are dynamic systems;
• define the terms biotic factor and abiotic factor
• explain how human activities can manipulate the flow of energy through ecosystems;
• describe one example of primary succession resulting in a climax community
• explain that conservation is a dynamic process involving management and reclamation;
• outline, with examples, the effects of human activities on the animal and plant populations in the Galapagos Islands.


• explain how plant responses to environmental changes are co-ordinated by hormones, with reference to responding to changes in light direction;
• discuss why animals need to respond to their environment;
• describe the role of the brain and nervous system in the co-ordination of muscular movement;
• describe how co-ordinated movement requires the action of skeletal muscles about joints, with reference to the movement of the elbow joint;
• explain, with the aid of diagrams and photographs, the sliding filament model of muscular contraction;
• outline the role of ATP in muscular contraction, and how the supply of ATP is maintained in muscles;
• state that responses to environmental stimuli in mammals are co-ordinated by nervous and endocrine systems;
• describe escape reflexes, taxes and kineses as examples of genetically-determined innate behaviours;

All the above are the specification points that have not yet come up.
:eek: - Thank you!
Also, the bit about how insulin affects cells (response to insulin) hasn't come up either! May want to add that.
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SnakehipsTTC
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(Original post by MyselfEtAl)
:eek: - Thank you!
Also, the bit about how insulin affects cells (response to insulin) hasn't come up either! May want to add that.
Isn't that only for F214? There are going to be synoptic elements which we can't prepare for.

The only bit i can find on the spec about insulin is this:

"outline the process involved in the genetic engineering of bacteria to produce human insulin"
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The Illuminati
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(Original post by MyselfEtAl)
:eek: - Thank you!
Also, the bit about how insulin affects cells (response to insulin) hasn't come up either! May want to add that.
Definitely F214, involves glycogenesis where insulin binds to hepatocytes so they take up glucose and convert it to glycogen for storage
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MyselfEtAl
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(Original post by The Illuminati)
Definitely F214, involves glycogenesis where insulin binds to hepatocytes so they take up glucose and convert it to glycogen for storage

(Original post by dmccririck)
Isn't that only for F214? There are going to be synoptic elements which we can't prepare for.

The only bit i can find on the spec about insulin is this:

"outline the process involved in the genetic engineering of bacteria to produce human insulin"
Whoops, my bad! I just remember my teacher saying it hasn't come up yet.
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riddle&mystery
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#16
(Original post by bahjat93)
Does some1 know any where, were i can find CONCISE notes on the whole topic .
A video that could sum up the whole topic would be better. I just cant be asked to revise for biology any more :mad:

https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B40c...it?usp=sharing
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tnk191
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Hi, sorry but do u still have this document? Would be hugely helpful thanks x
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