Bailey271
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I am extremely interested in going abroad to the Netherlands to study an undergraduate degree.
From experience, or known knowledge, can anyone tell me which is the best one for a student like me, who wants a good nightlife, and would like there to be a lot of international students, which would be the best?
Or just generally which ones people like etc and why?
Thank you
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Whitley
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Hi, are you still interested in studying in the Netherlands? What are you thinking of doing/ what are you currently studying?
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boumavilla
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I am also extremely interested in studying in the Netherlands. I have SO many questions that I would like answered.
I'm currently studying for my A-levels but I have already decided that once I go to uni I would like to do an Astrophysics/Astronomy degree. Does anyone know which would be the best, say, 5 unis for me to study an undergraduate degree at in this field in Holland? I have searched many times on the internet about this, and most places say Amsterdam is the best but I think only first hand experience could tell me the true answer. Although any opinions I would be very grateful to hear!
Many thanks!
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iammichealjackson
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Does anyone know what the best university for post-graduate psychology is?
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Ravel
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Hi there, I am Dutch although I go to uni in England - hence I might be able to be of some help to you all!

There are not as many uni's in Holland as there are in the UK - and the differences in quality are not as big. There are 'universities' and 'hogescholen' (literally: high schools, or '... of applied sciences) which have a more practical approach. In Holland, secondary education is divided into several levels (not just one, like 'A-levels') and more people have access to the 'hogescholen' than to universities. If you have studied A-levels and received decent results then I'd expect you wouldn't have a problem getting into the 'real' universities, which are usually in the larger cities.

This means most uni's have a good nightlife; obviously, Amsterdam is said to have the best, but other cities (Utrecht, Groningen, Maastricht, Rotterdam and Leiden for example) all have good nightlife because there are lots of students around. Some universities are especially well-respected in certain subject areas; Rotterdam for economical degrees for example, Leiden for law and languages; Utrecht is the one place to study veterinary sciences. There are three 'technical' universities; Delft, Twente (which is actually not the name of a city but an area in the east) and Eindhoven, of which Delft is supposed to be the most 'popular' choice, but Eindhoven has a larger design-specialized component.

That being said, the differences are not as big and there are no universities that are particularly 'bad' in certain areas. Choices are usually made based upon city and university-specific critera, e.g. Maastricht uni has a special style of teaching whereas others have a more 'classical' approach. There is a number of so-called 'university-colleges' which have the American-style 'liberal arts and sciences' approach and are all internationally oriented and English-taught, so might be worth having a look at.

I am assuming that most of you do not speak Dutch () so you will be looking for English-taught undergraduate degrees; that would certainly 'cut down' the number of options you have significantly.

Anyways, if I can be of more help, just message me
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boumavilla
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(Original post by Ravel)
Hi there, I am Dutch although I go to uni in England - hence I might be able to be of some help to you all!

There are not as many uni's in Holland as there are in the UK - and the differences in quality are not as big. There are 'universities' and 'hogescholen' (literally: high schools, or '... of applied sciences) which have a more practical approach. In Holland, secondary education is divided into several levels (not just one, like 'A-levels') and more people have access to the 'hogescholen' than to universities. If you have studied A-levels and received decent results then I'd expect you wouldn't have a problem getting into the 'real' universities, which are usually in the larger cities.

This means most uni's have a good nightlife; obviously, Amsterdam is said to have the best, but other cities (Utrecht, Groningen, Maastricht, Rotterdam and Leiden for example) all have good nightlife because there are lots of students around. Some universities are especially well-respected in certain subject areas; Rotterdam for economical degrees for example, Leiden for law and languages; Utrecht is the one place to study veterinary sciences. There are three 'technical' universities; Delft, Twente (which is actually not the name of a city but an area in the east) and Eindhoven, of which Delft is supposed to be the most 'popular' choice, but Eindhoven has a larger design-specialized component.

That being said, the differences are not as big and there are no universities that are particularly 'bad' in certain areas. Choices are usually made based upon city and university-specific critera, e.g. Maastricht uni has a special style of teaching whereas others have a more 'classical' approach. There is a number of so-called 'university-colleges' which have the American-style 'liberal arts and sciences' approach and are all internationally oriented and English-taught, so might be worth having a look at.

I am assuming that most of you do not speak Dutch () so you will be looking for English-taught undergraduate degrees; that would certainly 'cut down' the number of options you have significantly.

Anyways, if I can be of more help, just message me
First of all... Hoi! Hoe gaat het? Ik kan spreken een beetje Nederlands!
(I have been learning for about 2 years now!)

Dank u so much for your answer! :adore:

However, as you say I have been looking for an English taught degree, as my Dutch isn't that good. I have found a number of Astrophysics/Astronomy degrees at different unis, but I'm unsure about which is undergraduate...do I take a Masters degree first in Holland? Everytime I look on the requirements I see that I have to take a Bachelors first, but I haven't found one Science degree that is a Bachelors let alone it being in English...

Another question I have is, how long does it take to undertake a Masters and a PhD in Holland? Is it 7 years like in England? I've just seen SO many different opinions on the matter from what I have seen on the internet...
Although one thing I have seen is that during a PhD, I know that you work for the university?

I have a cousin at Delft Uni and another at Amsterdam Uni. I am pretty sure my cousin in Delft is studying Graphic Design linked to marketing and advertising.

Nightlife in Holland I know will be great! The Netherlands are without doubt the best country in the world! :cool: Even though I have never been there! I don't know why I do, but I just have this MASSIVE soft spot for Holland, like I love the country, I guess it's all the small things! But I know how most of you Dutch are, you'll say your country is terrible and be ever so modest about it! :lol:

One more thing I must compliment you with is your outstanding English! :yes:
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Ravel
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I already had a feeling that it might be quite hard to find English-taught undergraduate degrees in your specific area. Most undergraduate degrees ('bachelor degrees') are taught in Dutch, most masters degrees in Holland - which you apply for after you have obtained your bachelor's degree - are taught in English. Having said that, Dutch unis start to offer more and more English-taught undergraduate degrees to increase their international student population; apart from the 'university colleges' that I mentioned (which have a broader curriculum, so presumably not what you're looking for?) I only know of a few English taught undergraduate courses and those are usually more economics-oriented.

Regarding the time schedule; it is generally the same as in the UK. An undergraduate degree, which leads up to obtaining a BA or a BSc, takes three years to complete; a masters degree either 1 or 2 years, and a PhD would be another few years, probably 4. The big difference indeed is that as a PhD student, you are employed by the university; that means that you get an actual salary for it (although it is obviously not massive; but it should cover your living expenses etc.!).

I have had a quick look for your specific course. Only a few universities offer astrophysics at undergraduate level (Groningen and Leiden), and in Nijmegen, Utrecht and Amsterdam (either the 'University of Amsterdam' or the 'Vrije' University) it is offered in combination with physics. However, all these programmes are taught in Dutch. As I said, if you want to pursue your undergraduate studies in the Netherlands, your best bet would be to either change your field of interest to economics ( ) or go for one of the 'university colleges', which offer broader programmes but to allow you to tailor your studies by choosing modules that interest you; via that route, you could specialize towards a specific masters. The other option is to do your undergrad elsewhere and come to the Netherlands for your masters because those programmes are usually English-taught - same goes for PhDs, lots of internationals come to the Netherlands for PhDs without being able to speak much Dutch.

You are right in thinking that it is a great country though (Says the person who moved away from it for uni, lol) Dutch unis have only recently realised that many international students (recently mostly British) are interested in coming to the Netherlands, hence they are probably going to introduce more English-taught bachelor degrees in the future, but that is not going to help you now I'm afraid... Well you could always just brush up your Dutch a bit and go for it anyway
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boumavilla
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(Original post by Ravel)
I already had a feeling that it might be quite hard to find English-taught undergraduate degrees in your specific area. Most undergraduate degrees ('bachelor degrees') are taught in Dutch, most masters degrees in Holland - which you apply for after you have obtained your bachelor's degree - are taught in English. Having said that, Dutch unis start to offer more and more English-taught undergraduate degrees to increase their international student population; apart from the 'university colleges' that I mentioned (which have a broader curriculum, so presumably not what you're looking for?) I only know of a few English taught undergraduate courses and those are usually more economics-oriented.

Regarding the time schedule; it is generally the same as in the UK. An undergraduate degree, which leads up to obtaining a BA or a BSc, takes three years to complete; a masters degree either 1 or 2 years, and a PhD would be another few years, probably 4. The big difference indeed is that as a PhD student, you are employed by the university; that means that you get an actual salary for it (although it is obviously not massive; but it should cover your living expenses etc.!).

I have had a quick look for your specific course. Only a few universities offer astrophysics at undergraduate level (Groningen and Leiden), and in Nijmegen, Utrecht and Amsterdam (either the 'University of Amsterdam' or the 'Vrije' University) it is offered in combination with physics. However, all these programmes are taught in Dutch. As I said, if you want to pursue your undergraduate studies in the Netherlands, your best bet would be to either change your field of interest to economics ( ) or go for one of the 'university colleges', which offer broader programmes but to allow you to tailor your studies by choosing modules that interest you; via that route, you could specialize towards a specific masters. The other option is to do your undergrad elsewhere and come to the Netherlands for your masters because those programmes are usually English-taught - same goes for PhDs, lots of internationals come to the Netherlands for PhDs without being able to speak much Dutch.

You are right in thinking that it is a great country though (Says the person who moved away from it for uni, lol) Dutch unis have only recently realised that many international students (recently mostly British) are interested in coming to the Netherlands, hence they are probably going to introduce more English-taught bachelor degrees in the future, but that is not going to help you now I'm afraid... Well you could always just brush up your Dutch a bit and go for it anyway
I don't mind doing a Physics+Astrophysics degree. I've just been looking some more and found that there is an undergraduate degree in Astronomy (Bachelors) at Groningen! :gah: I've sent off for some details of the course, because apparently it's new to 2013, which might mean (as you mentioned) it's a new course which is in English (as it wasn't mentioned)!

Being paid for your education sounds like a fantastic idea! Which will mean that I can leave what will be a crappy job in Holland after 4 years, whilst paying reasonable tuiton fees beforehand! Instead of having to pay 7 years of huge tuiton fees! What jobs do you think would suit a student such as me?

I perhaps wouldn't be interested in the college idea. I haven't looked into that. I just want to get away from England so much! Why did you want to come here from your beautiful country?! :eek:

Thanks again so much for your answer! :woo:
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Ravel
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That could well be, from what I understood Dutch unis are now starting to realise that they are becoming a more and more attractive option to British students hence they are coming up with new courses now
The 'university colleges' are quite new as well; there are a few of them (University college Utrecht, University College Amsterdam, to name the two in the largest cities). They are more internationally orientated (lots of international students and Dutch students mixed together), completely English taught (and conversations etc. in English too, as it is the common language for all students) and what's more, they provide your accommodation on campus, which is something the other unis do not automatically do (although I suspect they would be able to be of help to international students; generally however, Dutch students need to find their own housing straight from the start!)

I must admit it is funny to watch all you British people wanting to leave England and move to Holland whereas I've done the opposite route :P Just went for a change of scenery, some international experience etc. I suppose
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boumavilla
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(Original post by Ravel)
That could well be, from what I understood Dutch unis are now starting to realise that they are becoming a more and more attractive option to British students hence they are coming up with new courses now
The 'university colleges' are quite new as well; there are a few of them (University college Utrecht, University College Amsterdam, to name the two in the largest cities). They are more internationally orientated (lots of international students and Dutch students mixed together), completely English taught (and conversations etc. in English too, as it is the common language for all students) and what's more, they provide your accommodation on campus, which is something the other unis do not automatically do (although I suspect they would be able to be of help to international students; generally however, Dutch students need to find their own housing straight from the start!)

I must admit it is funny to watch all you British people wanting to leave England and move to Holland whereas I've done the opposite route :P Just went for a change of scenery, some international experience etc. I suppose
I have just checked the official Groningen website and found exciting news, the degree is in English!! :woohoo: I don't suppose you would know the A-level requirements to get in would you? It doesn't say in the link here: http://www.rug.nl/fmns-programme/bsc...stronomy/index . How good is Groningen university in your opinion? Is it one of the best unis in the Netherlands? That is a view that I have had.
The uni colleges sound like a good idea, I'll look at them in more detail sometime. They could be good if I didn't get into an English course over there.
I can speak Spanish and French too, so that's why I'm excited about going to Holland as many of the students will be foreign so we can converse in multiple languages! I love learning languages. I guess I'd fit into the Dutch way as you guys are beastly at languages!
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Ravel
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That indeed is very good news for you! Groningen certainly is a good uni, I do not think the universities differ much in quality but from the people I know who went there, everyone loved it. The city is great too, all the way up north, and very popular with students as they form quite a large part of the city's population

So you speak Spanish and French, that is great - Dutch people do indeed usually speak more than one language, at least until a certain level (we're more or less forced to take French and/or German at school, plus more and more people taking Spanish :P )
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boumavilla
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(Original post by Ravel)
That indeed is very good news for you! Groningen certainly is a good uni, I do not think the universities differ much in quality but from the people I know who went there, everyone loved it. The city is great too, all the way up north, and very popular with students as they form quite a large part of the city's population

So you speak Spanish and French, that is great - Dutch people do indeed usually speak more than one language, at least until a certain level (we're more or less forced to take French and/or German at school, plus more and more people taking Spanish :P )
Wow! This is all sounding great!
I'm thinking of visiting the uni some time in the future. Which is saying something because I've only been abroad once, but my Mom said it would be a good idea to go and have a look.
Thank you so much for your information, because without you mentioning some things I may never have found that Astronomy degree at Groningen!

So what kind of things do I have to look forward to in the Netherlands? I've already researched a fair bit about the country. I am already following the football over there!
Another question I have aswell is when I'm there, to what extent would the Dutch public be bothered with me speaking Dutch? Or would most happily converse in English? I am wondering because when I went to Iceland, I was polite enough to learn the basic phrases of ordering things and saying generic conversation phrases, but everytime I went to use them the Icelanders would just return my Icelandic with English!
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Kaas
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(Original post by boumavilla)
Another question I have aswell is when I'm there, to what extent would the Dutch public be bothered with me speaking Dutch? Or would most happily converse in English? I am wondering because when I went to Iceland, I was polite enough to learn the basic phrases of ordering things and saying generic conversation phrases, but everytime I went to use them the Icelanders would just return my Icelandic with English!
Most Dutch people speak English, so they will most likely reply in English when you speak Dutch with an English accent. While it may be handy when you've just arrived and can't speak Dutch, it will also make it harder for you to learn Dutch.


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Alexgadgetman
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(Original post by boumavilla)
Wow! This is all sounding great!
I'm thinking of visiting the uni som to what extent would the Dutch public be bothered with me speaking Dutch? Or would most happily converse in English? I
The people working at McDonalds are all bilingual, 'nough said.
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boumavilla
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Most Dutch people speak English, so they will most likely reply in English when you speak Dutch with an English accent. While it may be handy when you've just arrived and can't speak Dutch, it will also make it harder for you to learn Dutch.
I can already speak Dutch fairly well. I almost took the GCSE!
I understand that most Dutch people can speak English, in fact, everyone seems to be able to speak the language except for old aged people!
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Ravel
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Yes that's true, Dutch people have a tendency to reply in English, just out of politeness really - to make it easier. However if you ask if they would proceed in Dutch they'll really like that!

Something else worth researching is 'Sinterklaas' - the Dutch celebration around the 5th of December that more or less replaces Santa Claus at Christmas eve. It probably all sounds very weird to you, quite a few odd traditions around it, but you won't be able to escape it
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gagaslilmonsteruk
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I've heard Maastricht is extremely popular with Brits.
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boumavilla
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(Original post by Ravel)
Yes that's true, Dutch people have a tendency to reply in English, just out of politeness really - to make it easier. However if you ask if they would proceed in Dutch they'll really like that!

Something else worth researching is 'Sinterklaas' - the Dutch celebration around the 5th of December that more or less replaces Santa Claus at Christmas eve. It probably all sounds very weird to you, quite a few odd traditions around it, but you won't be able to escape it
Sinterklaas! :woo:
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Whitley
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I'm from England and I took A-levels and currently study Bachelor aerospace engineering at Delft University of Technology. It is taught in English. It's still my first year. I can help if you want information about this uni in particular but the system here, i'll be honest, still confuses me. But i love it here, there are LOADS of international students. We all get along and have loads of fun. Delft city is nice and Rotterdam is just down the road by train. If you have any questions feel free to message me
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boumavilla
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(Original post by Whitley)
I'm from England and I took A-levels and currently study Bachelor aerospace engineering at Delft University of Technology. It is taught in English. It's still my first year. I can help if you want information about this uni in particular but the system here, i'll be honest, still confuses me. But i love it here, there are LOADS of international students. We all get along and have loads of fun. Delft city is nice and Rotterdam is just down the road by train. If you have any questions feel free to message me
Sounds cool!

Do you have a job over there currently?
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