Disabled students allowance and epilepsy

Watch
This discussion is closed.
FastBallooningHead
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 9 years ago
#1
I know a friend who claimed an iMac for dyslexia and was wondering if having epilepsy makes me eligible for one?

I know this is a bit of a cheeky question but in fairness having epilepsy isn't great fun and I do pay my taxes
2
Matthew Higgins
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#2
Report 9 years ago
#2
Not officially. DSA should cover any additional expenses caused by the fact you're studying with a disability, that any non-disabled student wouldn't encounter.

Nobody is "eligible for an iMac". In a needs assessment, somebody would work through what needs you have in terms of equipment, transport and non-medical help, that are caused exclusively by the disability, and recommendations will be made based on that.

I also have epilepsy, and haven't had any need to claim anything from the DSA that is specific to the Epilepsy, except a small allowance to cover a taxi home on the small number of occasions I have been unwell and don't feel up to getting the bus.

That said, everyone is different. If you can convince an assessor that you need whatever piece of equipment you want, and that students without Epilepsy don't, you might have a chance of getting it, not that I agree with the principle.
0
River85
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#3
Report 9 years ago
#3
(Original post by FastBallooningHead)
I know a friend who claimed an iMac for dyslexia and was wondering if having epilepsy makes me eligible for one?

I know this is a bit of a cheeky question but in fairness having epilepsy isn't great fun and I do pay my taxes
Why do you want a Mac over a PC? What course do you do and do you use Mac only software on that course?

You may be entitled to a Windows PC, as this is usually the default recommendation, but whether you can get a Mac will depend on whether the additional expense can be justified (e.g. software that you need for your course is Mac only). You will need to provide more than "Epilepsy isn't great fun and I do pay my taxes", I'm afraid.

But, yes, you can still apply for DSA. During your Needs Assessment you will discuss areas of support with a DSA assessor, who will then make appropriate recommendations.
0
homebythefence
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#4
Report 9 years ago
#4
(Original post by FastBallooningHead)
I know a friend who claimed an iMac for dyslexia and was wondering if having epilepsy makes me eligible for one?

I know this is a bit of a cheeky question but in fairness having epilepsy isn't great fun and I do pay my taxes

(Original post by River85)
Why do you want a Mac over a PC? What course do you do and do you use Mac only software on that course?

You may be entitled to a Windows PC, as this is usually the default recommendation, but whether you can get a Mac will depend on whether the additional expense can be justified (e.g. software that you need for your course is Mac only). You will need to provide more than "Epilepsy isn't great fun and I do pay my taxes", I'm afraid.

But, yes, you can still apply for DSA. During your Needs Assessment you will discuss areas of support with a DSA assessor, who will then make appropriate recommendations.
River's right, you may be able to claim a DSA funded laptop but you would need to speak to your assessor.
0
Tiger Rag
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#5
Report 9 years ago
#5
In part, it does depend on what you're used to using. However, I don't understand how having epilepsy means you "need" a mac.
0
That Bearded Man
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#6
Report 9 years ago
#6
No.

Having epilepsy shouldn't entitle you to money and I'm annoyed if you think it should. I have epilepsy and don't think it right to claim anything.

Unless you are heading to halls and want a ground floor I don't think it right to do so.

Also, apparently "epileptic" is not politically correct, lord knows why.
1
That Bearded Man
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#7
Report 9 years ago
#7
(Original post by Matthew Higgins)
Not officially. DSA should cover any additional expenses caused by the fact you're studying with a disability, that any non-disabled student wouldn't encounter.

Nobody is "eligible for an iMac". In a needs assessment, somebody would work through what needs you have in terms of equipment, transport and non-medical help, that are caused exclusively by the disability, and recommendations will be made based on that.

I also have epilepsy, and haven't had any need to claim anything from the DSA that is specific to the Epilepsy, except a small allowance to cover a taxi home on the small number of occasions I have been unwell and don't feel up to getting the bus.

That said, everyone is different. If you can convince an assessor that you need whatever piece of equipment you want, and that students without Epilepsy don't, you might have a chance of getting it, not that I agree with the principle.
May I ask how "feeling unwell" entitles you to a taxi home? Sounds irrelevent to your epilepsy
2
MutantGecko
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#8
Report 9 years ago
#8
sorry to hi-jack a thread, but i was also wondering about this, i have a hereditary neuropathy and have no idea if i even have any expenses because of it and if i do, do i qualify for anything does anyone else here by any remote chance have HMSN and knows about DSA?
0
Tiger Rag
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#9
Report 9 years ago
#9
(Original post by That Bearded Man)
May I ask how "feeling unwell" entitles you to a taxi home? Sounds irrelevent to your epilepsy
Have you tried getting on a bus after having a seizure?

Having epilepsy shouldn't entitle you to money and I'm annoyed if you think it should. I have epilepsy and don't think it right to claim anything.
For some epilepsy does cause memory problems; so they need things like a dictaphone / note taker.. My childhood epilepsy has really affected my memory.
0
squeakysquirrel
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#10
Report 9 years ago
#10
(Original post by OU Student)
In part, it does depend on what you're used to using. However, I don't understand how having epilepsy means you "need" a mac.
I don't understand how having dyslexia means you "need" a mac either.
0
Tiger Rag
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#11
Report 9 years ago
#11
(Original post by squeakysquirrel)
I don't understand how having dyslexia means you "need" a mac either.
They may need software, such as a screen reader.
1
River85
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#12
Report 9 years ago
#12
(Original post by That Bearded Man)
No.

Having epilepsy shouldn't entitle you to money and I'm annoyed if you think it should. I have epilepsy and don't think it right to claim anything.

Unless you are heading to halls and want a ground floor I don't think it right to do so.
It's not money (except in the case of reimbursement of costs such as books or photocopying) but equipment or other form of support.

It really depends on the individual. Someone with any type of seizures, but particularly absence seizures, might need a voice recorder because it's obviously easy to miss out on important lecture information if they experience periods of unconsciousness during a lecture. In a post-ictal state they might feel disorientated so need someone to help them with orientation. Similar with a travel allowance and having help with transport. I know from personal experience of commuting that, if someone were to have a seizure, particularly tonic clonic seizure, on an overcrowded train (where you can't find a seat and are crammed into vestibule ends with 20 others) then this can potentially put him or her at risk of being injured/crushed. Even the experience of being on an overcrowded bus or train makes many anxious. Or someone might have significant concentration problems after a seizure and have difficulty remembering which bus to get or have difficulties crossing a road safely.

Someone who has their seizures completely controlled by medication, which doesn't have any real side effects, or have perhaps only a relative handful of seizures a month, which doesn't affect their ability to study, mightn't need any of this support so therefore won't be entitled. I am one of those people, my entitlement to DSA is largely based on other health conditions and not my controlled epilepsy. This is not the case for all, however.

Also, apparently "epileptic" is not politically correct, lord knows why.
Because the person is being defined by their condition. Instead of being a complex person who just happens to have a condition called epilepsy, they are being defined by it. It might sound strange and I know many people with epilepsy don't care either way, but some do. The label "epileptic" makes me uncomfortable, I have to say, for a lot of historical reasons related to stigma, epilepsy and loss of status. Not that I'd chastise someone for using it.

(Original post by MutantGecko)
sorry to hi-jack a thread, but i was also wondering about this, i have a hereditary neuropathy and have no idea if i even have any expenses because of it and if i do, do i qualify for anything does anyone else here by any remote chance have HMSN and knows about DSA?
You may be eligible. All you can do is apply and attend a Needs Assessment, which is where any potential difficulties and areas of support can be discussed. You don't know unless you apply. But I suspect that there may be areas where you might require support, particularly if you have problems with fatigue.

In short, it's not really whether a condition makes you eligible or not. As with epilepsy, though there can be some broad similiarities among people with the same condition, exactly how a person is affected by a condition is really down to the individual. You will be eligible if you have additional study related expenses or needs and in order to determine this you'll need to attend an Assessment. If you're at university you can contact your disability service for advice or, even if you're applying, your firm choice might still offer some information about what support they can offer and perhaps also DSA (though DSA itself is provided by your funding body and not the university).
2
That Bearded Man
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#13
Report 9 years ago
#13
(Original post by OU Student)
Have you tried getting on a bus after having a seizure?



For some epilepsy does cause memory problems; so they need things like a dictaphone / note taker.. My childhood epilepsy has really affected my memory.
Surely they don't occur often enough during a lecture to require a dictaphone?

Or indeed enough times in a year to require a taxi home?
1
Tiger Rag
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#14
Report 9 years ago
#14
(Original post by That Bearded Man)
Surely they don't occur often enough during a lecture to require a dictaphone?

Or indeed enough times in a year to require a taxi home?
That depends on the person. There is generally no set pattern as to when and how often they'll happen.

Many people also have memory loss. As as 11 year old, I had a seizure in which I hurt my head and have had memory problems since. My dad has the same issue.
0
That Bearded Man
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#15
Report 9 years ago
#15
(Original post by River85)
It's not money (except in the case of reimbursement of costs such as books or photocopying) but equipment or other form of support.

It really depends on the individual. Someone with any type of seizures, but particularly absence seizures, might need a voice recorder because it's obviously easy to miss out on important lecture information if they experience periods of unconsciousness during a lecture. In a post-ictal state they might feel disorientated so need someone to help them with orientation. Similar with a travel allowance and having help with transport. I know from personal experience of commuting that, if someone were to have a seizure, particularly tonic clonic seizure, on an overcrowded train (where you can't find a seat and are crammed into vestibule ends with 20 others) then this can potentially put him or her at risk of being injured/crushed. Even the experience of being on an overcrowded bus or train makes many anxious. Or someone might have significant concentration problems after a seizure and have difficulty remembering which bus to get or have difficulties crossing a road safely.

Someone who has their seizures completely controlled by medication, which doesn't have any real side effects, or have perhaps only a relative handful of seizures a month, which doesn't affect their ability to study, mightn't need any of this support so therefore won't be entitled. I am one of those people, my entitlement to DSA is largely based on other health conditions and not my controlled epilepsy. This is not the case for all, however.



Because the person is being defined by their condition. Instead of being a complex person who just happens to have a condition called epilepsy, they are being defined by it. It might sound strange and I know many people with epilepsy don't care either way, but some do. The label "epileptic" makes me uncomfortable, I have to say, for a lot of historical reasons related to stigma, epilepsy and loss of status. Not that I'd chastise someone for using it.



You may be eligible. All you can do is apply and attend a Needs Assessment, which is where any potential difficulties and areas of support can be discussed. You don't know unless you apply. But I suspect that there may be areas where you might require support, particularly if you have problems with fatigue.

In short, it's not really whether a condition makes you eligible or not. As with epilepsy, though there can be some broad similiarities among people with the same condition, exactly how a person is affected by a condition is really down to the individual. You will be eligible if you have additional study related expenses or needs and in order to determine this you'll need to attend an Assessment. If you're at university you can contact your disability service for advice or, even if you're applying, your firm choice might still offer some information about what support they can offer and perhaps also DSA (though DSA itself is provided by your funding body and not the university).
I am sort of like this, however what exactly should someone be entitled to? Having a seizure during the day is justifiable for a taxi home, but surely it is reasonable that people can get this themself without claiming? Surely a mate would help them home?
0
Ice_Queen
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#16
Report 9 years ago
#16
(Original post by That Bearded Man)
No.

Having epilepsy shouldn't entitle you to money and I'm annoyed if you think it should. I have epilepsy and don't think it right to claim anything.

Unless you are heading to halls and want a ground floor I don't think it right to do so.

Also, apparently "epileptic" is not politically correct, lord knows why.
It shouldn't entitle us to money. But I feel I should be entitled to the same level of education my peers get. If I am unwell and can't get into uni for the sake of a taxi ride, or can't get out of bed because of side-effects of my medication, or can't follow a lecture because I am having seizures every ten minutes (literally), that is extremely detrimental to my education.

As for the politically correct thing, I do not want to be identified by my disorder. I am a human being. There is more to me than a messed up head.

(Original post by That Bearded Man)
May I ask how "feeling unwell" entitles you to a taxi home? Sounds irrelevent to your epilepsy
Many reasons. First and foremost - being post-ictal is very disconcerting. I might have a huge headache (especially if I fell over, or hit my head on something) or I might not understand quite where I am. I might be nauseated.

I also have absence seizures, and I can have up to a dozen of those per hour. It's exhausting, because I am seizing and constantly post-ictal. Usually after a rough time I just want to collapse into bed, and facing a bus journey was just impossible. I fell asleep in the reception area a couple of times because I couldn't face going out there. Not only that, but I tried a couple of medications that made me as sick as a dog, and absolutely exhausted. Stress made me worse and it was a vicious circle.

(Original post by That Bearded Man)
Surely they don't occur often enough during a lecture to require a dictaphone?

Or indeed enough times in a year to require a taxi home?
As above, I was having a dozen an hour. You want to try that some time? I'd get home and get my notes out and have very little idea of what actually went on. I copied my best mate's work for the majority of my first year because I didn't know I could get help.


Everybody's epilepsy is different. Some have them once a year, some have dozens a day. Some people with epilepsy can live completely normal lives, whereas for others it is debilitating. I had up to dozens of absence seizures per day, and I would have tonic-clonic seizures if I was particularly stressed/tired.

I'm nearly a year seizure free. I'm 22. All through my education (including four years of full time university) I have had seizures, and it is something I would not wish on my worst enemy. I do not think we are entitled to this that and the other over and above other people, but I think we should be given the help to live a normal life.


Back to the purpose of the thread - OP, go and have a needs assessment, but don't expect a posh computer or laptop or whatever. Everyone has different needs. Please don't use your epilepsy as an excuse to get free stuff.
3
River85
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#17
Report 9 years ago
#17
(Original post by That Bearded Man)
I am sort of like this, however what exactly should someone be entitled to? Having a seizure during the day is justifiable for a taxi home, but surely it is reasonable that people can get this themself without claiming? Surely a mate would help them home?
Whatever people are entitled to depends on the individual and what their needs are and will be discussed during a Needs Assessment.

A contribution toward travel expenses (e.g. taxi) is only given to those with serious mobility problems, so don't think any person with epilepsy can claim it. The majority of those who do commute probably don't.

If a student is given a travel allowance in the form of a contribution toward the cost of a taxi, then the cost of using public transport for that journey is taken into account. A student will not have the entire cost of the taxi journey paid for them, only the additional amount. So if the journey costs £3 on the bus, and £9 by taxi, the student is re-imbursed £6 and is expected to make up the difference him or herself.

You need to consider that many students are not able to afford to pay for a taxi out of their own pocket and therefore need the help*. Taxi journeys are expensive, particularly over the course of an academic year. If they are not provided with the help then they may not be able to study. Considering that people with disabilities and chronic medical conditions can face a number of social, educational and occupational barriers, and are more likely to be either unemployed or underemployed, to see a student, who is not able to meet such costs, not apply to university, or drop out, and possibly damage their career and life prospects, would be a tragedy.

Getting a friend or relative to give them a lift is a possibility, and I'm sure some do, but it can be an inconvenience and not everyone is able to rely on this. For those that can then I suppose it's an alternative.

In short, DSA exists for additional costs associated with disabilities or medical conditions. Additional costs meaning costs that a person without the condition does not face. By facing additional costs the student with the disability/medical condition faces a financial disadvantage.

*But, having said that, DSA is not means tested so a students' income, or the income of his or her family, is not taken into account.
0
That Bearded Man
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#18
Report 9 years ago
#18
(Original post by Ice_Queen)
It shouldn't entitle us to money. But I feel I should be entitled to the same level of education my peers get. If I am unwell and can't get into uni for the sake of a taxi ride, or can't get out of bed because of side-effects of my medication, or can't follow a lecture because I am having seizures every ten minutes (literally), that is extremely detrimental to my education.

As for the politically correct thing, I do not want to be identified by my disorder. I am a human being. There is more to me than a messed up head.



Many reasons. First and foremost - being post-ictal is very disconcerting. I might have a huge headache (especially if I fell over, or hit my head on something) or I might not understand quite where I am. I might be nauseated.

I also have absence seizures, and I can have up to a dozen of those per hour. It's exhausting, because I am seizing and constantly post-ictal. Usually after a rough time I just want to collapse into bed, and facing a bus journey was just impossible. I fell asleep in the reception area a couple of times because I couldn't face going out there. Not only that, but I tried a couple of medications that made me as sick as a dog, and absolutely exhausted. Stress made me worse and it was a vicious circle.



As above, I was having a dozen an hour. You want to try that some time? I'd get home and get my notes out and have very little idea of what actually went on. I copied my best mate's work for the majority of my first year because I didn't know I could get help.


Everybody's epilepsy is different. Some have them once a year, some have dozens a day. Some people with epilepsy can live completely normal lives, whereas for others it is debilitating. I had up to dozens of absence seizures per day, and I would have tonic-clonic seizures if I was particularly stressed/tired.

I'm nearly a year seizure free. I'm 22. All through my education (including four years of full time university) I have had seizures, and it is something I would not wish on my worst enemy. I do not think we are entitled to this that and the other over and above other people, but I think we should be given the help to live a normal life.


Back to the purpose of the thread - OP, go and have a needs assessment, but don't expect a posh computer or laptop or whatever. Everyone has different needs. Please don't use your epilepsy as an excuse to get free stuff.
Thank you, your last point summarised my point far better. I had no idea that you had absent seizures so often, I am generalised tonic-clonic only, so familiar with the nausea, headaches, stomach pain, fear, confusion and obvious risk of pain, injuring others or stigma. Then again, I had a "mate" who, when I told my mates I had epilepsy, didn't believe me and called me an attention seeker. About a year later I seized in his presence, he refused to apologise because he said without evidence it was fair enough for him to assume I was making it up, so I'm not sure I completely wish this upon no one.

Oh and I had been 1 and a half years free and was learning to drive, then seized, so it's only about 3 months now.
0
That Bearded Man
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#19
Report 9 years ago
#19
(Original post by River85)
Whatever people are entitled to depends on the individual and what their needs are and will be discussed during a Needs Assessment.

A contribution toward travel expenses (e.g. taxi) is only given to those with serious mobility problems, so don't think any person with epilepsy can claim it. The majority of those who do commute probably don't.

If a student is given a travel allowance in the form of a contribution toward the cost of a taxi, then the cost of using public transport for that journey is taken into account. A student will not have the entire cost of the taxi journey paid for them, only the additional amount. So if the journey costs £3 on the bus, and £9 by taxi, the student is re-imbursed £6 and is expected to make up the difference him or herself.

You need to consider that many students are not able to afford to pay for a taxi out of their own pocket and therefore need the help*. Taxi journeys are expensive, particularly over the course of an academic year. If they are not provided with the help then they may not be able to study. Considering that people with disabilities and chronic medical conditions can face a number of social, educational and occupational barriers, and are more likely to be either unemployed or underemployed, to see a student, who is not able to meet such costs, not apply to university, or drop out, and possibly damage their career and life prospects, would be a tragedy.

Getting a friend or relative to give them a lift is a possibility, and I'm sure some do, but it can be an inconvenience and not everyone is able to rely on this. For those that can then I suppose it's an alternative.

In short, DSA exists for additional costs associated with disabilities or medical conditions. Additional costs meaning costs that a person without the condition does not face. By facing additional costs the student with the disability/medical condition faces a financial disadvantage.

*But, having said that, DSA is not means tested so a students' income, or the income of his or her family, is not taken into account.
My problem is only with the attitude wherby people believe they can make some money purely due to their epilepsy, if any day they have a seizure, it is okay with me if they have partial reimbursement.

Does beg the question though, as you say, most severely epileptic students are likely unemployed, thus, after university, how exactly do they get employment without throwing the Disabilities Discriminations Act at people.
0
Ice_Queen
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#20
Report 9 years ago
#20
(Original post by That Bearded Man)
Thank you, your last point summarised my point far better. I had no idea that you had absent seizures so often, I am generalised tonic-clonic only, so familiar with the nausea, headaches, stomach pain, fear, confusion and obvious risk of pain, injuring others or stigma. Then again, I had a "mate" who, when I told my mates I had epilepsy, didn't believe me and called me an attention seeker. About a year later I seized in his presence, he refused to apologise because he said without evidence it was fair enough for him to assume I was making it up, so I'm not sure I completely wish this upon no one.

Oh and I had been 1 and a half years free and was learning to drive, then seized, so it's only about 3 months now.
S'alright

It's not nice at all. I am soon to start working on a project regarding epilepsy awareness - all kinds - soon so hopefully I can get something moving.

It's sad that they didn't believe you :hugs: I still don't think I could wish this on anyone. At worst, I might wish they could experience a seizure and being badly post-ictal, but nothing more. My life has not been made a living hell; there are people who have suffered much worse than I, but even that is bad enough.

Oh damn that sucks I am a year up on 1/7 (obviously I can't exactly pin down the date of my last seizure with absences, but we took an arbitrary date, it was around 1/7 I got up to my current dosage) so I'll be driving! I am running around like a maniac and I'm so excited! No-one quite understands why I am so happy to be a year seizure-free, it's not just for the driving. I wish I knew people near me with epilepsy to share it with me.

Was it just a breakthrough or are you now upping your dosage (if you don't mind me asking)? I don't think I could get this far and have a seizure without breaking down entirely!
0
X
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Do you think receiving Teacher Assessed Grades will impact your future?

I'm worried it will negatively impact me getting into university/college (75)
37.5%
I'm worried that I’m not academically prepared for the next stage in my educational journey (21)
10.5%
I'm worried it will impact my future career (13)
6.5%
I'm worried that my grades will be seen as ‘lesser’ because I didn’t take exams (50)
25%
I don’t think that receiving these grades will impact my future (25)
12.5%
I think that receiving these grades will affect me in another way (let us know in the discussion!) (16)
8%

Watched Threads

View All