hollybanolly
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Hi, please read, I know its long sorry

I have applied for 2012 entry for Pharmacy and luckily have accepted an offer at Bath Uni for AAB to start in September. I am over the moon with this but I have always been a bit reserved about going into pharmacy..I was never those type of people who knew what they wanted to do since they were like 4 :rolleyes: haha but I couldn't really see myself doing a different course/different career that's worth while other than pharmacy for me.

But I'm in the middle of my last lot of A level exams and it looks about 50/50 on whether I'll get the grades needed (AAB) as I was very ill in my january exams so I have been playing catch up ever since and the amount of exams I've had in the past month is crazy.

But then I thought about physiotherapy.. I love sports and enjoy the outdoors, (this is the downside of pharmacy that I found) but I know not all physios are outdoors. I don't have any work experience in physiotherapy; only in pharmacy. But perhaps waiting a year I could do the necessary retakes to get my grades up if I needed to and get the work experience I muchly need if I was to consider physiotherapy.

I would love love love to work along side a team of doctors apart of, for example, a football team but I know that (or I've heard) the NHS and unis muchly prefer students to go into the hospitals? Am I right in saying this?
And also with physiotherapy, I got a bit confused with the whole pre-reg year, is that the same as the pre-reg year in pharmacy? If someone could explain this that would be great

So yeah, I really don't know what to do, part of me wants to go ahead with pharmacy but the other part would like to look into physiotherapy-I think its because the euros have been on and I've just be wishing at times to be one of those people who runs onto the pitch and helps the players haha

But don't get me wrong, the thing that appeals to me in pharmacy is the patient centred care and if I was going to go into this I'd want to become a clinical pharamacist.

So if any of you know anything about these two professional careers and work experience to do with physiotherapy please get back to me.. if feels like with all this pressure of exams and not knowing what to do with my life makes me quite scared..I mean I can't choose what chocolate bar to eat let alone decide on a career that will affect me for the rest of my life!!

I'm sorry about the essay!
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terkowski1990
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HAHA wow i thought i had problems.... not really... well i'm currently doing an access course to do physiotherapy at university. as you probably already know physiotherapy is highly demanding and requires both good grades and work experience...

if you was to choose physiotherapy one thing to take into consideration is that you shouldnt mention you want to get involved in to sports physio... purely because its funded by the NHS and they want you to work for them and not go off to a football team etc

i think what you should really do is try and get on to some work experience for physiotherapy? give yourself a chance to see what you would be doing if you was to choose that path...

about the pre-reg i really have no idea about that ahah my course doesnt finish until december so ive not looked that deeply in to it. just give yourself the best chance...

i hope this helps in some way
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Ironmike
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I have just graduated as a physio. If you enjoy sports and the outdoors, great, but this isn't what you will be doing as a physio. Certainly not for a long time anyway. You will need to do placements in neuro and respiratory as a must which don't involve any outdoors or sports, well I did do some walking round the garden with people post stroke, but that's about it. There are also other areas such as women's health, paeds, mental health etc that you could get asked to do. Running onto a football pitch with a sponge is a minuscule area of physio, and those guys who you see on TV are probably all 10 - 15 years post grad with a masters and a heck of a lot of experience.

It's not that unis prefer you to go into hospitals, but its just that that is where you will do your clinical training. This might change as private practice comes more into the arena with the any willing provider setup that is now in existence, but assume for now that your 1000 hours of practice will be in the NHS, and it won't be glamourous! I've come into contact with poo, vomit, blood and guts on numerous occasions, and if you aren't prepared for this aspect of the job then I would stick to pharmacy.

There is no pre-reg year in physio. I am qualified now and I can go work wherever I want. In reality, this will hopefully be on a junior rotational post within the NHS, but there is no requirement for me to do so.

I would advise you to get some experience in physio, or certainly do some in depth reading about the various roles that a physio can have. Research the courses - physio is full on, 9-5 Mon to Fri for me with Weds afternoons off, but some unis I know are different to this. NHS experience is hard to get, so get applying now if you want to get any this side of Christmas. Other options are contacting charities, nursing homes etc who might have a physio working for them and who might be more approachable if you offer to stick around to chat to the residents or do the tea or something.
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domzy_7
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Hi,

I just graduated from physio too. Like the above post says, it doesn't really seem likely that as a physio you will be working outdoors or in sports.

Similarly, sports physio is pretty similar to normal physio but just happens to be in a sports environment. So if you don't like hospital physio, it's unlikely that you will love 'sports physio'.

It is also important to think about the job situation. Being from Scotland, I know the environment may be different but there does seem to be very few band five rotation posts at the moment and that is your bread and butter really. That's I suppose what the dream start would be to actually get your basic physio skills.

I would say look into it, but look into the whole profession and not just one aspect. For example respiratory physio and musculoskeletal physio are almost like 2 different professions and both take a long time to master.



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hollybanolly
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Thanks for the responses

(Original post by terkowski1990)
HAHA wow i thought i had problems.... not really... well i'm currently doing an access course to do physiotherapy at university. as you probably already know physiotherapy is highly demanding and requires both good grades and work experience...

if you was to choose physiotherapy one thing to take into consideration is that you shouldnt mention you want to get involved in to sports physio... purely because its funded by the NHS and they want you to work for them and not go off to a football team etc

i think what you should really do is try and get on to some work experience for physiotherapy? give yourself a chance to see what you would be doing if you was to choose that path...

about the pre-reg i really have no idea about that ahah my course doesnt finish until december so ive not looked that deeply in to it. just give yourself the best chance...

i hope this helps in some way
Thanks, yeah I think the best plan for me before I make any decisions is to try and get some work experience. Which uni do you go to then?


(Original post by Ironmike)
I have just graduated as a physio. If you enjoy sports and the outdoors, great, but this isn't what you will be doing as a physio. Certainly not for a long time anyway. You will need to do placements in neuro and respiratory as a must which don't involve any outdoors or sports, well I did do some walking round the garden with people post stroke, but that's about it. There are also other areas such as women's health, paeds, mental health etc that you could get asked to do. Running onto a football pitch with a sponge is a minuscule area of physio, and those guys who you see on TV are probably all 10 - 15 years post grad with a masters and a heck of a lot of experience.

It's not that unis prefer you to go into hospitals, but its just that that is where you will do your clinical training. This might change as private practice comes more into the arena with the any willing provider setup that is now in existence, but assume for now that your 1000 hours of practice will be in the NHS, and it won't be glamourous! I've come into contact with poo, vomit, blood and guts on numerous occasions, and if you aren't prepared for this aspect of the job then I would stick to pharmacy.

There is no pre-reg year in physio. I am qualified now and I can go work wherever I want. In reality, this will hopefully be on a junior rotational post within the NHS, but there is no requirement for me to do so.

I would advise you to get some experience in physio, or certainly do some in depth reading about the various roles that a physio can have. Research the courses - physio is full on, 9-5 Mon to Fri for me with Weds afternoons off, but some unis I know are different to this. NHS experience is hard to get, so get applying now if you want to get any this side of Christmas. Other options are contacting charities, nursing homes etc who might have a physio working for them and who might be more approachable if you offer to stick around to chat to the residents or do the tea or something.
Thanks, I find those areas that you've mentioned interesting. I think the best thing to do is get some work experience done and see if its for me. Which uni did you go to? And if you don't mind me asking is the pay good? You don't have to say how much, as I think as although money is very nice I'd rather enjoy the job than dislike it and get paid more than average.
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hollybanolly
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(Original post by domzy_7)
Hi,

I just graduated from physio too. Like the above post says, it doesn't really seem likely that as a physio you will be working outdoors or in sports.

Similarly, sports physio is pretty similar to normal physio but just happens to be in a sports environment. So if you don't like hospital physio, it's unlikely that you will love 'sports physio'.

It is also important to think about the job situation. Being from Scotland, I know the environment may be different but there does seem to be very few band five rotation posts at the moment and that is your bread and butter really. That's I suppose what the dream start would be to actually get your basic physio skills.

I would say look into it, but look into the whole profession and not just one aspect. For example respiratory physio and musculoskeletal physio are almost like 2 different professions and both take a long time to master.



This was posted from The Student Room's iPhone/iPad App
Thanks, its all good me hearing these points about what its really like as a physio, as I have gone with the stereotype of a physio within the sporting side of things. The hospital environment in pharmacy was the most appealing part of pharmacy as there seemed to be more stuff going on, is that then the same in physio then when you talk about it being in the hospitals? And would you also say that the pay is good then? I'm trying to not make salary a huge impact in my decisions as I'd rather be in a happy career I think, than regret taking something that I wanted for just the money sake of things.
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terkowski1990
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I'm not at university at the minute, i'm from nottingham and i am hoping to go and study up in Edinburgh have you thought of where you would like to study? ps; ironmike how much experience did you have before you applied to university?
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domzy_7
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(Original post by hollybanolly)
Thanks, its all good me hearing these points about what its really like as a physio, as I have gone with the stereotype of a physio within the sporting side of things. The hospital environment in pharmacy was the most appealing part of pharmacy as there seemed to be more stuff going on, is that then the same in physio then when you talk about it being in the hospitals? And would you also say that the pay is good then? I'm trying to not make salary a huge impact in my decisions as I'd rather be in a happy career I think, than regret taking something that I wanted for just the money sake of things.
Well hospital work is certainly busy. Some parts are more exciting for me than others but it is all what you make of it. For example elderly rehab is an area lots of people told me was very boring but when I went, my senior was really enthusiastic and pushed me to think up different treatment ideas. I ended up really enjoying it. Musculoskeletal outpatients in hospitals, I found really time pressured. Too much patients and notes to write but the actual assessment and treatment was really interesting too. There is lots of different areas in hospitals that you can work in and it's really good to get a chance to work in many of them at uni. Spinal injuries is another area I was lucky enough to get the chance to work in. That was heart breaking but at the same time it was great to know that you are making a positive impact on someone's life.




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domzy_7
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(Original post by terkowski1990)
I'm not at university at the minute, i'm from nottingham and i am hoping to go and study up in Edinburgh have you thought of where you would like to study? ps; ironmike how much experience did you have before you applied to university?
Just wondering why you want to study at Edinburgh? I'm from Scotland and studied at Glasgow Caledonian.


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HCubed
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My personal biases are showing here, but I have never understood the attraction of pharmacy. But then I am only thinking of those people in the back of the chemists putting pills into bottles - there must be a lot more to it than that.

I know quite a few physios - I use sports physios myself frequently, and several family friends are physios. Our rugby team has a physio that comes to all our matches - so yes, you can get outdoors. They all seem to really love what they do, and it is a career that can combine well with family commitments. One of our friends is a single mother with 4 children, but she has a physio practise working from home and fits it around her kids' schedules. Also, it's one of the medical specialities where you are almost always seeing patients that are getting better - most people get some benefit from physio. I would say go for it. Good luck with whatever you decide.
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Ironmike
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(Original post by hollybanolly)
Thanks for the responses



Thanks, yeah I think the best plan for me before I make any decisions is to try and get some work experience. Which uni do you go to then?




Thanks, I find those areas that you've mentioned interesting. I think the best thing to do is get some work experience done and see if its for me. Which uni did you go to? And if you don't mind me asking is the pay good? You don't have to say how much, as I think as although money is very nice I'd rather enjoy the job than dislike it and get paid more than average.
Pay bandings are here:

http://www.nhscareers.nhs.uk/details...lt.aspx?id=766

Being inner London tops it up a fair bit - see the bottom of the page.

Definitely get some work experience as it will help you see exactly what is involved with this physio lark!
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Jambo
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I just finished my first year at Bath for pharmacy. It is a really good course and you can obviously end up going into community, hospital or industry after doing your pre reg year. Personally I want to become a specialist in a hospital after a few years but the variety is there to do what you want really. Were there any questions you had about the course in particular?
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Anjalij1802
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I read ur all paragraph nd after nd long yr I want to know which one should I choice
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