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bitofagenius
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Hi, I want to study neuroscience, and go into a neuro based career, such as working in a neuro department of a hospital and dealing with more of the kind of medical cases of neuroscience, as opposed to purely doing neuro research.

If anyone does anything like this or has any ideas, do you recommend studying medicine first for that kind of route of neurology, and then further studying neuroscience, or just doing a neuroscience degree?

Thanks! X
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oz40
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Neurology is a speciality of medicine that you can train for after your medicine degree. Check here for further information:

http://www.jrcptb.org.uk/specialties...Neurology.aspx

In short, you need an MBBS degree.
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Hippokrates
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Just a quick question. If you want to work on a stroke ward do you specialise in neurology or medicine?
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CraigKirk
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(Original post by bitofagenius)
Hi, I want to study neuroscience, and go into a neuro based career, such as working in a neuro department of a hospital and dealing with more of the kind of medical cases of neuroscience, as opposed to purely doing neuro research.

If anyone does anything like this or has any ideas, do you recommend studying medicine first for that kind of route of neurology, and then further studying neuroscience, or just doing a neuroscience degree?

Thanks! X
It depends on whether you want to treat neuroscience patients, and how much you're interested in medicine in general.

If you opt for the medical degree option, you will be required to do a considerably larger amount of study in things not strictly relevant to neuroscience. You're required to study general medicine, ethics, all of the systems etc., and then in later years do rotations in all departments. If you're only in it for the neuroscience, you're likely to find the majority of medicine very boring and therefore difficult. There's even the possibility, since it's so competitive, that you won't even get to specialise in neuroscience after approximately ten years in medicine. How would you feel then? Would you be able to continue to cope with doing medicine as a career? If you're questioning whether you'd be able to cope, then you probably wouldn't be able to. This would suggest that you should go for the Neuroscience degree directly, making sure to network lots across the way (as from what I'm told, this is a very good way of getting into academia).

If you did Neuroscience, your patient contact would be limited largely, but you could still work in clinical research. You may be allowed to see some medical cases at the discretion of the patient, but on the whole it is doctors' and nurses' occupation to review medical cases in depth. As such, doing neuroscience would be likely to limit your future job to mostly pure research.

However, if you are interested in Biology/Chemistry/Statistics/Ethics etc. as comprise the bigger picture of medicine, then I'd say go for it. You're going to be required to do great amounts of study in all areas, including Neuroscience, which you could even intercalate in so that you have both degrees! To go for medicine, you'd have to know that you're really interested in what it means to be a doctor: dedication to patients, the empathy, the compassion, the difficult decisions, the paperwork and of course the rewards.

It's not something someone here can directly advise you on. The only thing I can directly advise you on is: If you're not 100% sure you want to medicine for all of what medicine encompasses (not just neuroscience), then do not do it.
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Helenia
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(Original post by Hippokrates)
Just a quick question. If you want to work on a stroke ward do you specialise in neurology or medicine?
Stroke medicine is a separate subspecialty of medicine, just as neurology is.
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Hippokrates
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(Original post by Helenia)
Stroke medicine is a separate subspecialty of medicine, just as neurology is.
Thank you
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Insigniff
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Hi!
I'm new here, and wonder if specializing in neuroscience necessarily involves dealing with patients?
I guess my question is the opposite of the OP's; is there a route into pure research without the clinical aspects of neuroscience?
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Brachioradialis
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(Original post by Insigniff)
Hi!
I'm new here, and wonder if specializing in neuroscience necessarily involves dealing with patients?
I guess my question is the opposite of the OP's; is there a route into pure research without the clinical aspects of neuroscience?
Sure, it's an undergraduate degree in neuroscience or a related field. Not medicine. You can then take it further by applying for research roles (i.e. a PhD, maybe a prior MSc).
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Insigniff
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(Original post by MattKneale)
Sure, it's an undergraduate degree in neuroscience or a related field. Not medicine. You can then take it further by applying for research roles (i.e. a PhD, maybe a prior MSc).
Thanks for the quick reply. I was wondering, since in my country (Sweden) there is no such option, unless you want to go through 5 years of tertiary education in medicine.
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Kaiaaa
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If you want to become a neurologist (dealing with medical cases) you need to do a medical degree first and then specialise after you graduate. I'm doing medicine and a third of my material this year is neuro. If you wanted to go down more of a research route, then a neuroscience degree might be better, but it sounds like you'd prefer to be working with patients. In any case, you can always do research after a medical degree as well. PM me if you like, if you have any questions about medicine
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Brachioradialis
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(Original post by Insigniff)
Thanks for the quick reply. I was wondering, since in my country (Sweden) there is no such option, unless you want to go through 5 years of tertiary education in medicine.
If there's no dedicated neuroscience option in your country I'd recommend looking at general human biology, biochemistry or biomedical science courses. These will usually have a module on neuroscience which can be a good starting point for a further research degree.

You can also look at courses which provide opportunity to enter professional industry for a year and apply to neuroscience institutions for further experience
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simplegeek
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Hi sorry but this is just a quick question i know its been ages but to become a neurologist can i do a degree in neuroscience first and then do medicine?
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Doc2be
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(Original post by simplegeek)
Hi sorry but this is just a quick question i know its been ages but to become a neurologist can i do a degree in neuroscience first and then do medicine?
Your quickest way is to study medicine. If you are interested in neurology you can intercalated and do a BSc in neuroscience if you like.


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