TSR George
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I do not want a mundane, standard career. An IT career seems like this whereas a CS career seems far more interesting (and better paid). As CS could involve research with large businesses and development of brand new computing devices whereas IT could lead to me essentially being a help desk worker forever.


So far CS seems to be winning in this respect. However I have never done any CS or programming and therefore would be unsure whether it was for me, especially in the programming side as I have never programmed.

Could somebody please offer their suggestions?
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xiyangliu
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If you had a choose. Driving a car or building a car ?

Driving: I recommend u to do IT
Building: Computing science



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person287
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Computing is generally just another name for Computer Science, although perhaps focusing a little less on programming and more understanding underlying systems (e.g. Data Transfer).

As far as I can see generally a Computer Science degree would be much better, because as far as I see it if you know how to build something for a computer (Computer Science/Programming), then you're pretty likely to be able to understand/troubleshoot any decently well built program, and would be able to fix it perhaps if you have access to the source code.
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tooosh
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Really does look like CS is what you want.
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Iqbal007
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Computer science, does get the respect, but you'll pick it up easily, but IT itself has programming modules in it, so either way you'll be doing some.

Computer science degree can get you any job the IT degree can get and more, due to it's content and what you learn in it.
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TLHroolz
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Out of curiosity...what a levels other than IT did you do?

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Casshern1456
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I suggest CS, you could start programming in Java it's the most basic and many CS recommend starting with that, there's a lot of help online and on youtube where you can get guidance if you find the right material you'll get the hang of it pretty soon, and also reading, I got the Head First: Design Pattern by Eric & Elizabeth Freeman - it's all about Java programming.
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The Polymath
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Tbh Connexions won't know a great deal about the world of work in the IT sector, as they don't work in it.

Computer Science is not just software - you'll do modules on, say, artificial intelligence, robotics, quantum computing

This is how I see it: Computer Science is to IT as Physics is to Engineering.
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The Polymath
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CS is software focused? Not at all! You'll do logic, proof, maths, linguistics etc.
For example - how to make a computer recognise complex language such as idioms.
- how to organise processes so that they're done as quickly as possible

I don't see why you couldn't work for those companies with CS - in fact you'd probably have more scope as you'd be able to design new and revolutionary ideas, just as Physicists come up with the idea for a new telescope and then Engineers carry it out.

You don't even need a computing-related degree! You can do Maths or Physics and work for those companies.

I think you're distinguishing between hardware and software far too much - which one is maths? Which is artificial intelligence? It's both and neither.
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Psyk
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I'm sure they'd have plenty of jobs for CS grads, but it sounds like you're interested in something like electronics engineering, or computer systems engineering, or computer science and electronics. They're courses that deal more with physical hardware. Obviously computer science and electronics is a mix between the two, and computer systems engineering is pretty much another name for that (at Bristol they changed the name of the course from computer systems engineering to computer science and electronics).

(Original post by Junaid96)
CS is software focused? Not at all! You'll do logic, proof, maths, linguistics etc.
For example - how to make a computer recognise complex language such as idioms.
- how to organise processes so that they're done as quickly as possible
I agree that Computer Science is not strictly about software, but in most cases you'll be applying that knowledge using software, not hardware. And in the real world, you'd be mostly using software solutions for those sorts of things.
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Dealmaster13
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Either Computer Science or (*) Engineering

I'd seriously head over to your local bookshop, take some time to flick through the AS and A2 courses for AQA Computing, and if you feel adventurous, have a look through some of the lecture notes (and obviously the summaries) of the courses you may wish to apply for in Computer Science or any other degree.
Cambridge has theirs publicly available for a start: http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/teaching/1112/part1a-cst.html
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Decoy88
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Hi, i recently came to the conclusion of Software Engineering instead of Computer Science. If you want actually design and build software for a product. CE. But if your more interested in Theory side if things CS. Both courses are quite similar, and offer very similar job prospects

http://forums.devshed.com/software-d...ce-406839.html

http://forums.xkcd.com/viewtopic.php?f=12&t=11699

http://www.cs.concordia.ca/prospecti...mputerscience/


Hope these help.


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SecondHand
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Computer Science degrees do have hardware in them, York makes a point of allowing you to focus on hardware if you want.
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tooosh
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All CS courses have at least a bit of hardware. York has a lot. If you specifically want hardware then you should be looking at EE, if you want a balance of CS stuff and hardware then CSE.
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rmhumphries
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You can get a helpdesk / IT Technician job without a degree, sometimes without even A levels. As far as I am aware, an IT degree will not open many doors for you, where as a Computer Science degree will open doors into most business-related jobs / computing jobs / as well as help with IT-related jobs.

Computing is almost Computer Science, sometimes the is a small distinction with Computer Science having more weight on theory - but even then that differs from uni to uni. In essence, you have CS, Computing is 97% CS, (Maths is 20% CS), IT is 10% CS.

(I included Maths, as with most computing degrees you do a fair amount of math; and while you might not be able to go straight along and sit a math module without learning anything - you do learn some similar skills and so-on (and Math modules are good to take as optional modules, and I think that Math students do CS modules more often than they do other school's modules).

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You can do robotics and similar modules within the CS School, or take Electrical Engineering modules from their school if you actually want to learn in more depth how components are actually made.

You learn how components work from a software (machine-code) level, and abstracted as low down as data buses and similar - but not much the electronics do it.

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CS/Computing or EE (Electrical Engineering). Possibly Physics/Maths but you would need to start at a lower level and do more on-the-job training.

CS/Computing is better if you don't know what you want to do; if you were more sure you wanted to go into the more making computer parts element and so-on, then do an EE degree.

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Depends what you want to design. Design new algorithms for google -> CS (or CS and Maths). Design new processors -> EE. And so on.

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Yes (although CSE will mean Computer Science & Engineering Joint Honours in some cases).
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