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    Is it possible to start to teach yourself latin and if so can anyone recommend any books?

    MB
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    (Original post by musicboy)
    Is it possible to start to teach yourself latin and if so can anyone recommend any books?

    MB

    The JACT books are supposed to be good. Look on Amazon for them. Quite expensive though i'll presume as you have to buy three of them.
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    (Original post by musicboy)
    Is it possible to start to teach yourself latin and if so can anyone recommend any books?

    MB

    out of interest why do you want to teach yourself latin?
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    The Cambridge Latin Course books I used were good.
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    (Original post by TheWolf)
    out of interest why do you want to teach yourself latin?
    I am very interested in where our language comes from and it will also help in any of my studies in early christian music. It looks interesting and fun.

    MB
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    (Original post by musicboy)
    I am very interested in where our language comes from and it will also help in any of my studies in early christian music. It looks interesting and fun.

    MB
    I've found latin very useful. It is a logical language, and if you follow the rules it isn't too hard. Grammer is far more important than vocab, if you know what a word is doing you can often guess its meaning from the context.

    A teacher here claims it can improve you sentance structure and the quality of your writing, but I'm not so sure
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    (Original post by musicboy)
    I am very interested in where our language comes from and it will also help in any of my studies in early christian music. It looks interesting and fun.

    MB

    Good for you. Although I'd suggest Greek to understand the language more, but if you just want to understand hymms then Latins the one you want to learn.
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    how easy would it be to learn latin in cambridge as extra to your degree?
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    (Original post by PhilomenaGuinea)
    how easy would it be to learn latin in cambridge as extra to your degree?
    latin isnt that hard as it is mostly latin to english that u do and so many of the words are like the english...there are a lot of tables of nouns, verbs etc though but if u r good at learning those sort of things, what is stopping u
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    (Original post by lgs98jonee)
    latin isnt that hard as it is mostly latin to english that u do and so many of the words are like the english...there are a lot of tables of nouns, verbs etc though but if u r good at learning those sort of things, what is stopping u
    Latin has got alot of vocabulaires to learn. Most people struggle gcses alot, and a-level is very hard too.
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    (Original post by lgs98jonee)
    latin isnt that hard as it is mostly latin to english that u do and so many of the words are like the english...there are a lot of tables of nouns, verbs etc though but if u r good at learning those sort of things, what is stopping u
    That would seriously depend on what level you have done it to. ANything you learn in school is not true latin.
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    (Original post by TheWolf)
    Latin has got alot of vocabulaires to learn. Most people struggle gcses alot, and a-level is very hard too.
    Agreed. A level is quite hard, GCSe is pretty easy though.
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    I'm in the middle of AS Latin, and Latin for examination purposes is really a lot of learning. I have three different teachers, one for poetry- translating Catullus as a Roman poet, I have done Juvenal, and Horace, but chose Catullus for set-book, and now I have to learn the translations off by heart, of about twenty poems. There's prose, which is the Pro Cluentio speech by Cicero, which again, I have to learn by heart, and finally translation and grammar, in which this week we were looking at gerundives.

    Latin to GCSE I took the Cambridge Latin Course, easily the best for 'teach yourself'. Really, Latin is based on verbs, and grammar, and vocabulary, but far more so the verbs. It's much easier to understand with a good basis of English grammar, which sadly does not happen much these days. I went to a very old fashioned prep school in London, where I learnt grammar in a special lesson, and Latin from year three. Latin's as has been said, a logical language, except in poetry, the verb is at the end of the sentence, and indicates the tense, who has done it, and so on.

    It depends really on what you want it for. For music purposes, the Latin can vary. Archaic Latin is fairly different from the classical, and of course, Italian is far more frequently used. Most courses are geared toward learning verbs and grammar for examination - the Scottish Higher book for translation is the best, I'm using it for revision in my classes. However, if it's vocabulary, then you really want to obtain a word list - the exam boards give you about 45 pages of vocab to learn by heart, as those words will appear in translation.
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    (Original post by Joey_Johns)
    That would seriously depend on what level you have done it to. ANything you learn in school is not true latin.
    I'd disagree with that, I'm doing Ovid's Metamorphoses XI, the original, and Cicero's second phillipic, both true latin, and both very enjoyable
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    (Original post by theone)
    I'd disagree with that, I'm doing Ovid's Metamorphoses XI, the original, and Cicero's second phillipic, both true latin, and both very enjoyable
    I mean true true latin, if you get what I mean. Are you that boy from Scumburgh? I cant remember.
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    I used the Peter Jones 'Teach Yourself latin' book, published by the Daily Telegraph. It's quite fun and not too heavy. As has already been mentioned, the Cambridge course is also good, but moves very slowly.
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    Thanks for all your help people. Now I need to go to a bookshp and choose one of your suggestions all the while trying to resist the huge gravitational pull of the musicology section.

    MB
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    (Original post by Joey_Johns)
    I mean true true latin, if you get what I mean. Are you that boy from Scumburgh? I cant remember.
    No I'm not, have you could something against me?
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    Try and get yourself on a course.
    There is a 2 week intensive course in London in summer (early July i think?) that is taught by some of the best teachers from top schools and you can go from a beginner to AS level standard in that time.
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    I was told by my Latin teachers that continuing the subject alone is v. hard; you need a tutor. However, I see no reason why you can't teach yourself the basics of grammar and vocab. Hopefully it'd be enough for music, but if you want to study longer texts I'd recommend you get a translated version to work alongside.

    Make sure you have a good grasp of English first, in understanding person etc. This website should be useful:

    http://www.math.ohio-state.edu/~econrad/lang/latin.html
 
 
 
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