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musicbloke
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#21
Report Thread starter 16 years ago
#21
(Original post by Amrad)
Try and get yourself on a course.
There is a 2 week intensive course in London in summer (early July i think?) that is taught by some of the best teachers from top schools and you can go from a beginner to AS level standard in that time.

does anyone have details of this course. It sounds good but wold also cost much more than my proms season ticket.

MB
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defec8ing
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#22
Report 16 years ago
#22
(Original post by musicboy)
does anyone have details of this course. It sounds good but wold also cost much more than my proms season ticket.

MB

it is run by JACT. google it and you will get the site. It is run at bryanston school in dorset, and will cost around £400; i know this cos i'm doing th greek equivalent.
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naelse
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#23
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#23
The Bryanston course is £500 this year, but it runs for 2 weeks in a boarding school, which isn't for everyone. I'm also under the impression that it doesn't teach Latin.
The London one is good too and is held at Kings this year. Most importantly, it is much cheaper (£70 last yr), because it isn't residential (though they will find student accomodation for you if you're not based in London).
There's also a Latin summer school in somerset.

Information for everything can be found here:

http://www.jact.org/summerschools.htm

hope this helps
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Alexander
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#24
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#24
Bryanston is only Greek (i went on it, it was great fun) but there is a Latin one too, look at naelse's link.
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Radagasty
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#25
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#25
(Original post by musicboy)
Is it possible to start to teach yourself latin and if so can anyone recommend any books?
Here is a post I made on another forum a while back in response to a request for textbook recommendations. You may find it helpful.

-----------------------

> Hi, I'm new to ALL. I studied Latin for two semesters several years
> ago, but remember next to nothing. I'd like to get back into it.
> What textbooks do you recommend? Are there any I should avoid?
> Are there any worthwhile Latin enthusiast societies?

With regard to textbooks, it really depends on which style of learning suits you best. Typically, Latin texts are either deductive, like Wheelock's Latin, or inductive, like the Cambridge Latin Course. Often, doing it both ways concurrently can be very helpful, and, indeed, this is the way I recommend. As you progress to an intermediate level, you may wish to acquire a reference grammar and a dictionary as well.

From my experience, the best inductive text for adults (the Cambridge Latin Course is aimed at school-children, and adults may find it a little inane) is unequivocally Reading Latin by Peter Jones and Keith Sidwell. This text comes in two volumes: one with the Latin text and the other with grammar, vocabulary and notes. There is a third volume, the study guide, which is optional, but handy if you're trying to teach yourself Latin. IMHO, as far as the inductive method goes, this series is unmatched.

Given that you have already done two semesters of Latin, the deductive text I would recommend is Teach Yourself Latin by Gavin Betts. It was written with the independent learner in mind, and, IMO, is one of the better books in the Teach Yourself series. It is clear, concise and pedagogically sound, giving a very solid foundation in classical Latin. The learning curve is a little steep for someone with little prior knowledge of grammar, but this should be no problem for you.

The starting reference grammar I recommend is Benjamin Kennedy's revised Latin Primer, a reasonably concise work that describes the essential history, phonology, morphology, syntax and prosody of classical Latin. It is not as exhaustive as works like Gildersleeve & Lodge or Allen & Greenough, but explains all the important points without overwhelming the reader.

The Chambers-Murray Latin-English Dictionary is one that has stood me in good stead over the years. This is not necessarily a dictionary aimed at beginners, but as far as dictionaries go, and especially since you're not a complete beginner, I see little point in acquiring a dictionary that will be quickly outgrown. At the same time, this is not the OLD or L&S, which are probably a little excessive, although the latter may become necessary as you progress beyond classical Latin into mediaeval and ecclesiastical texts.

> My goal is to be able to read old Latin poetry, Church documents,
> etc. Once I get really good, I wouldn't mind having a penpal with
> whom I can correspond in Latin.

So far, the books I have recommended are focussed towards reading classical Latin. The two text types you mention, Old Latin poetry and church documents, represents great diversity in language. There are few extant Old Latin texts, so unless you have a strong interest in historical philology, familiarity with Old Latin is probable more effort than worth. The range of great works, both prose and poetry, in classical Latin makes its acquisition so much more worthwhile. I strongly suggest that you build a strong foundation in classical Latin before attempting mediaeval Latin, the language that is typical of church documents. I think the consensus is that mediaeval Latin is considerably more difficult than classical Latin. An excellent text is Reading Mediaeval Latin by Keith Sidwell, but it presumes relative familiarity with classical Latin.

To correspond in Latin, you will need to develop skill in Latin composition. Some believe that Latin composition should be attempted from the very beginning, but I think it is better to acquire a sound reading knowledge first. After all, in this day and age, there is little call for Latin composition. I have made my book recommendations accordingly, and, when you reach an appropriate level and wish to attempt some composition, you might like to supplement the texts with
something like North & Hillard or Woodcock.
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Radagasty
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#26
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#26
(Original post by TheWolf)
out of interest why do you want to teach yourself latin?
I think it's laudable (from Latin LAUDO, -ARE, to praise ) that Musicboy wants to learn Latin. To be truly learned, one must be well-versed in the classical languages -- if not Greek, certainly Latin -- but the study of classics is sadly neglected these days.
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musicbloke
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#27
Report Thread starter 16 years ago
#27
(Original post by Radagasty)
I think it's laudable (from Latin LAUDO, -ARE, to praise ) that Musicboy wants to learn Latin. To be truly learned, one must be well-versed in the classical languages -- if not Greek, certainly Latin -- but the study of classics is sadly neglected these days.
I have found someone who has said that they will help me a bit if I get stuck. She is a latin teacher and willing to do it free in her lunch hour. She says not enough people learn latin these days.

Thanks for all your help.

Musicboy
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