TCA2b
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Quick question on all these, but I am assuming they're all recognised across most of the globe? Specifically, in the US, Australia and countries like Singapore? I'm not so much curious from the perspective of whether immigration authorities accept them as I've a degree anyway, but more so as to whether employers in these countries recognise them, and particularly the AAT?
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TCA2b
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Bump.
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MancStudent098
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ACA has reciprocal arrangements with most commonwealth countries - ACCA bills itself as fairly global. CIMA is pretty global and given that management accounting isn't governed by national rules in the same way it should be pretty transferable. Sadly I don't know about AAT.

America (or rather I should say the US) is a bit of a problem for non-american accountants, they seem to think US gaap is so fiendishly complicated that lesser minds from other countries couldn't possibly grasp it. But we do transfer UK personnel out to the states on a regular basis so it's no impossibility, more of a mindset issue than a qualification one I think.
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TCA2b
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Thanks, I'll do a bit more digging with regards to the AAT.
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kevinfosterft
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Yes, all these certifications are recognized globally. This is what I found out from the other forums and websites. One thing that everyone seems to suggest is a) AAT is basic level and prepares you for accountancy and b) AAT gives you exemption for ACCA. I phoned up service provider Home Learning College and they confirmed that AAT will indeed give me exemptions in some courses when I start ACCA and AAT will prepare for the big bad world of accountancy. Check out the forums at AAT to get a good foothold on what it is about. Are you thinking of doing a full-time degree or through distance learning?
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ilovecatsforlife
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(Original post by MancStudent098)
ACA has reciprocal arrangements with most commonwealth countries - ACCA bills itself as fairly global. CIMA is pretty global and given that management accounting isn't governed by national rules in the same way it should be pretty transferable. Sadly I don't know about AAT.

America (or rather I should say the US) is a bit of a problem for non-american accountants, they seem to think US gaap is so fiendishly complicated that lesser minds from other countries couldn't possibly grasp it. But we do transfer UK personnel out to the states on a regular basis so it's no impossibility, more of a mindset issue than a qualification one I think.
which firm do you work for? (if you can say) - is it big4?
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MancStudent098
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(Original post by ilovecatsforlife)
which firm do you work for? (if you can say) - is it big4?
Yes.
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shane1989
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(Original post by TCA2b)
Quick question on all these, but I am assuming they're all recognised across most of the globe? Specifically, in the US, Australia and countries like Singapore? I'm not so much curious from the perspective of whether immigration authorities accept them as I've a degree anyway, but more so as to whether employers in these countries recognise them, and particularly the AAT?
CIMA

It seems you have been misinformed by previous commentators. The main accounting qualification in the US is CPA (Certified Public Accountant). AAT is not recognised in the US and CIMA has only recently started gaining "some" exposure with their JV with AICPA.

As for Australia, CIMA have mutual recognition with CPA Australia so both qualifications are treated as equals. CIMA also have a strong influence in Asia so CIMA should be recognised in Singapore.


ACCA/ACA

ACCA/ACA have more international recognition due to the areas covered regulation, Tax, Auditing etc. Again with regards to country exposure you will have to look for jobs posted in your desired country and then check what qualifications they ask. For the US, knowledge of the US GAAP is needed.

Final Note

Most countries offer a "pathway or conversion" to their local accountancy qualification. For example CIMA/ACCA/ACA can covert their qualification to a US CPA by sitting a conversion exam (provided you have enough credits for entrance to the exam. For entrance, 150 credits are needed which equals a 4 year US degree (120) + Masters (30) or equivalent . US CPA exams must be sat in the US.

3 year degrees would be worth (90) + CIMA/ACCA/ACA would be more than enough to sit the entrance exam however you will need to be in the US to sit the exam. Wouldn't be a problem to get a temp visa for UK individuals to go to the US and sit the exam (I don't know about another countries)

I am CIMA PQ with a business degree hoping to move to the US after full certification (early 2014) so I've been doing extensive research on this topic.

Any questions. Ask
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MancStudent098
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(Original post by shane1989)
CIMA

It seems you have been misinformed by previous commentators. The main accounting qualification in the US is CPA (Certified Public Accountant). AAT is not recognised in the US and CIMA has only recently started gaining "some" exposure with their JV with AICPA.
I'm pretty sure that what I said was "America (or rather I should say the US) is a bit of a problem for non-american accountants".

ACCA/ACA have more international recognition due to the areas covered regulation, Tax, Auditing etc.
Both focus heavily on UK Audit and Tax - I would imagine this is more of a hindrance than a help when it comes to international transferability.
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Samtheman1
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(Original post by MancStudent098)
I'm pretty sure that what I said was "America (or rather I should say the US) is a bit of a problem for non-american accountants".

Both focus heavily on UK Audit and Tax - I would imagine this is more of a hindrance than a help when it comes to international transferability.
That is probably why he mentioned something about a conversion exam....
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kevinfosterft
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(Original post by TCA2b)
but more so as to whether employers in these countries recognise them, and particularly the AAT?
I think employers anywhere would consider how much practical exposure you have and then the degree or certification. A friend, who is a certified AAT professional (UK), settled in Melbourne two months ago. He was able to get through the interview and secure a job owing to his professional experience (he has two years of experience), but a lesser pay as he was new to the accounting system down under.
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Senbonsakura
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Did you manage to move to the USA? How did it go?
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Richy001
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(Original post by MancStudent098)
I'm pretty sure that what I said was "America (or rather I should say the US) is a bit of a problem for non-american accountants".

Both focus heavily on UK Audit and Tax - I would imagine this is more of a hindrance than a help when it comes to international transferability.
I am happy with the answers so far.
What career options are available in the UK for ACA qualified Accountant from the institute of Chartered Accountants Nigeria? Is a conversion exam necessary for an Accountant of 20 years standing?
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Suvetha
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Hi
Could you please anyone provide information for excemption details for aat from cima part qualified?
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