Writing your hobbies and interests on your CV?

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Chrisruptor
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#1
Report Thread starter 9 years ago
#1
I've finally nearly finished putting my CV together, however my dad said I was missing my hobbies and interests.

Granted my main hobbies don't really represent any teamwork or communication skills, but would I be expected to just list all my hobbies and interests in a sentence or should I go into detail about each one, what's involved, what skills/qualities it gives me?

Also is it JUST hobbies, or should you include your interests as well. As in, not something you necessarily do, but have a general interest in such as business and animals?

On side note, in a skills based CV, what section should come first? Your education & qualifications with all your grades, or your skills & qualities such as computing, problem solving, organisation etc.
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moregano
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#2
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#2
I've never included my hobbies on my CV. If they're relevant, or demonstrate useful skills (leadership, teamwork, time management etc), or if you've achieved something, then consider including one or two, but don't let it detract from the main focus of you CV.

Interests I wouldn't include unless you're actually doing something that's worth mentioning. For example I wouldn't mention an interest in animals if you're just someone who enjoys walking their dog, but if you volunteer at a dogs home or compete in dog agility competitions I would include that.

Your education should come first, then your work experience, and then a small paragraph on your other interests if you really want to. "Skills and qualities" shouldn't really be listed on their own, it's better to include it in your work history, so you can talk about where you learned these skills and how you've used them.
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threeportdrift
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#3
Report 9 years ago
#3
(Original post by Chrisruptor)
...........
The point of putting your Interests (hobbies are part of the same thing) on a CV is that it gives you an alternative area of life to demonstrate relevant skills. If you have little or no professional experience in life, then it is often vital that you use this are of life to demonstrate relevant skills, especially things like leadership which you are unlikely to have had in a working environment.

You shouldn't be writing a Skills based CV. They are for very specific life circumstances which you almost certainly aren't in. An employer will expect and want a chronological CV from you.
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Muppety_Kid
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#4
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#4
(Original post by threeportdrift)
The point of putting your Interests (hobbies are part of the same thing) on a CV is that it gives you an alternative area of life to demonstrate relevant skills. If you have little or no professional experience in life, then it is often vital that you use this are of life to demonstrate relevant skills, especially things like leadership which you are unlikely to have had in a working environment.

You shouldn't be writing a Skills based CV. They are for very specific life circumstances which you almost certainly aren't in. An employer will expect and want a chronological CV from you.
I appreciate that this is a law-specific question, but would the following structure be OK?

  • Education
  • Legal Work Experience (description of responsibilities etc., but not explicitly mentioning skills gained)
  • Skills and Achievements (each skill, e.g. "teamwork", having its own paragraph, and achievements just listed)
  • Interests and Activities (other extra-curriculars which haven't been mentioned under skills, e.g. sport/music)
  • Other Skills (languages, driving licence etc.)


Thanks.
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threeportdrift
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#5
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#5
(Original post by Muppety_Kid)
I appreciate that this is a law-specific question, but would the following structure be OK?

  • Education
  • Legal Work Experience (description of responsibilities etc., but not explicitly mentioning skills gained)
  • Skills and Achievements (each skill, e.g. "teamwork", having its own paragraph, and achievements just listed)
  • Interests and Activities (other extra-curriculars which haven't been mentioned under skills, e.g. sport/music)
  • Other Skills (languages, driving licence etc.)


Thanks.
No. It should be Education, Legal Experience, Volunteering, Interests.

You ALWAYS explicitly give evidence of relevant skills and when/how they were applied. That is the entire aim of a CV because that is what the employer is judging a CV on.

You demonstrate skills by giving bullet points under the various events. Skills listed by themselves lose all context and credibility. Skills should always be evidenced in the context in which they were gained.

Nothing on a CV should be titled 'Other', because a CV is supposed to be a structured, organised document, and does not include 'other stuff I couldn't categorise but wanted to say' sections. Sections should also, as far as makes sense, have one word titles.
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Muppety_Kid
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#6
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#6
(Original post by threeportdrift)
No. It should be Education, Legal Experience, Volunteering, Interests.

You ALWAYS explicitly give evidence of relevant skills and when/how they were applied. That is the entire aim of a CV because that is what the employer is judging a CV on.

You demonstrate skills by giving bullet points under the various events. Skills listed by themselves lose all context and credibility. Skills should always be evidenced in the context in which they were gained.

Nothing on a CV should be titled 'Other', because a CV is supposed to be a structured, organised document, and does not include 'other stuff I couldn't categorise but wanted to say' sections. Sections should also, as far as makes sense, have one word titles.
Sorry, I don't think I explained that as well as I could've.

It's a bit of a stretch to say "watching a barrister for a week taught me about client handling skills", so under the Legal Work Experience section, I've just said "I shadowed a Criminal barrister...", and then client handling is mentioned as a specific skill under Skills and Achievements (its accompanying paragraph gives an example from my own background, in this case volunteering for a legal charity. Essentially I guess it's like an answer to a competency question).

I'd imagine that most of your advice will still be the same, but thought I'd clear up what I meant about skills!
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threeportdrift
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#7
Report 9 years ago
#7
(Original post by Muppety_Kid)
....................
Fine, but you shouldn't use 'I' or paragraphs and full sentences in a CV, even a law CV.
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Student23
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#8
Report 8 years ago
#8
(Original post by Chrisruptor)
I've finally nearly finished putting my CV together, however my dad said I was missing my hobbies and interests.

Granted my main hobbies don't really represent any teamwork or communication skills, but would I be expected to just list all my hobbies and interests in a sentence or should I go into detail about each one, what's involved, what skills/qualities it gives me?

Also is it JUST hobbies, or should you include your interests as well. As in, not something you necessarily do, but have a general interest in such as business and animals?

On side note, in a skills based CV, what section should come first? Your education & qualifications with all your grades, or your skills & qualities such as computing, problem solving, organisation etc.
There are some good examples of hobbies and interests here. Particularly, scroll down to the last image which has quite a few hobbies that might help you out. From that example you can derive that besides a number of hobbies there are also indications of interests (e.g. watching news, BBC Click (technology) and documentaries).
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Jess & Nick RMA
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#9
Report 6 years ago
#9
CVs need to be as concise as possible while still conveying all the relevant information. Employers don't need to see your life story - they want to see if you're the kind of person who has the skills to do the job. If they think you have, they'll then bring you in for an interview to confirm whether you're right for them or not. If hobbies and interests are ever going to be mentioned, it's more likely to be at an interview, to get a better idea of your personality. CVs should be professional, outlining your main skills, work experience, education and references. There's no real need to have anything else on there. CVs should never be longer than two pages really, and that's throughout your entire career! Don't fill out space - if anything do the opposite. Keep it clean, tidy and focused. It's fine to use bullet points for some parts. You can find out more about how to construct the perfect CV here.
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