How can I work out my average for this year? Watch

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jenniferwatson
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I got (out of 100) -

65 in a 30 credit module
60 in a 30 credit module
50 in a 10 credit module
44 in a 30 credit module
43 in a 20 credit module


I've tried online calculators but can't find anything that will help me. Does anyone know how to calculate this?

Thanks
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T'archer
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I recon you got 53% overall.
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username306617
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(Original post by jenniferwatson)
I got (out of 100) -

65 in a 30 credit module
60 in a 30 credit module
50 in a 10 credit module
44 in a 30 credit module
43 in a 20 credit module


I've tried online calculators but can't find anything that will help me. Does anyone know how to calculate this?

Thanks
I don't think the credits add any weight to each mark, just add your 5 results and divide by five, so you got 52.4% average, which is a 2.2
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ily_em
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53.875
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Tpx
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65 x 30 = 1950
60 x 30 = 1800
50 x 10 = 500
44 x 30 = 1320
43 x 20 = 860

1950 + 1800 + 500 + 1320 + 860 = 6430

30 + 30 + 10 + 30 +20 = 120

6430/120 = 53.58


Edit: BeanofJelly explains it properly
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BeanofJelly
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30* 0.65 = 19.5
30* 0.6 = 18
10* 0.5 = 5
30* 0.44 = 13.2
20* 0.43 = 8.6

^ That's the number of credits you earnt in each module (basically, the percentage you obtained mutliplied by the credits available).

In total that makes 64.3 credits.

The maximum credits available across all modules is 120 (30 + 30 + 10 + 30 + 20).

So you got 64.3 credits out of 120, which is 53.583% (64.3/120*100)

A 2:2.

But you could work on your maths :P


EDIT: Sorry, yes - universities give you "all the credits" for passing, but this is actually a meaningless gesture (which is why it's confusing) which only ensures you pass each module separately. The number of credits per module, affects proportionately their contribution to your weighted average mark (for a given year) in a way that is completely equivalent to the method outlined above.

(But in terms of your final degree classification - all sorts of little extra weightings (eg: final year being worth more) and extra rules (eg: viva voce examinations for borderline, or "many cases of exceptional work" may be applied, depending on the uni).
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BeanofJelly
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(Original post by Popppppy)
I don't think the credits add any weight to each mark, just add your 5 results and divide by five, so you got 52.4% average, which is a 2.2
No - the number of credits is important, because these determine the weight of a particular module. A module worth 50 credits is much more important to the final grade than a module worth only 10 credits.
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username306617
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(Original post by BeanofJelly)
No - the number of credits is important, because these determine the weight of a particular module. A module worth 50 credits is much more important to the final grade than a module worth only 10 credits.
Oh we don't do it like that at our uni, either you get all the credits (by passing the class) or no credits (failing the class). Cool cool.
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lil sister
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(Original post by Popppppy)
Oh we don't do it like that at our uni, either you get all the credits (by passing the class) or no credits (failing the class). Cool cool.
Yeah I think that's how most are done. Plus you have to get 120 credits for the whole year so it doesn't matter what each module is worth if you know the grades for all your modules.
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maskofsanity
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(Original post by BeanofJelly)
30* 0.65 = 19.5
30* 0.6 = 18
10* 0.5 = 5
30* 0.44 = 13.2
20* 0.43 = 8.6

^ That's the number of credits you earnt in each module (basically, the percentage you obtained mutliplied by the credits available).

In total that makes 64.3 credits.

The maximum credits available across all modules is 120 (30 + 30 + 10 + 30 + 20).

So you got 64.3 credits out of 120, which is 53.583% (64.3/120*100)

A 2:2.

But you could work on your maths :P
(Original post by BeanofJelly)
No - the number of credits is important, because these determine the weight of a particular module. A module worth 50 credits is much more important to the final grade than a module worth only 10 credits.
I'm confused.

Each year your credits add up to a total of 120 credits. It doesn't matter how much each module is worth in credits (you get all of the credits as long as you pass). Let's say she only had one module and it was worth 120 credits and she got 60% in this module - that's the same as AVERAGING 60% in 10 different modules of 12 credits each, adding up to 120 credits.

Credits only matter in that a larger credit module will affect your average more than a smaller one, i.e. it's better to get a First in a 30 credit module only because it's like getting a First in three 10 credit modules.

This thread is unnecessarily complicated: just add up your grades and divide by the number of modules - ignore credits, they simply add up to 120.
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Tpx
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(Original post by maskofsanity)
I'm confused.

Each year your credits add up to a total of 120 credits. It doesn't matter how much each module is worth in credits (you get all of the credits as long as you pass). Let's say she only had one module and it was worth 120 credits and she got 60% in this module - that's the same as AVERAGING 60% in 10 different modules of 12 credits each, adding up to 120 credits.

Credits only matter in that a larger credit module will affect your average more than a smaller one, i.e. it's better to get a First in a 30 credit module only because it's like getting a First in three 10 credit modules.

This thread is unnecessarily complicated: just add up your grades and divide by the number of modules - ignore credits, they simply add up to 120.
Yeah you can do it that way, but only if you add the grade twice for a module worth twice as many credits.
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maskofsanity
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(Original post by Tpx)
Yeah you can do it that way, but only if you add the grade twice for a module worth twice as many credits.
No, you don't need to do that if you get all the credits. The methods you and BeanofJelly outlined above are only if you get a portion of the total credits available for that module, e.g. if you got 50% in a 30 credit module, you'd get 15 credits. I have never heard of this before, at my university (and all my friends') you get ALL the credits just for passing, i.e. the number of credits is insignificant except in that they give you an indication of how much work they will require.
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FinalMH
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(Original post by maskofsanity)
No, you don't need to do that if you get all the credits. The methods you and BeanofJelly outlined above are only if you get a portion of the total credits available for that module, e.g. if you got 50% in a 30 credit module, you'd get 15 credits. I have never heard of this before, at my university (and all my friends') you get ALL the credits just for passing, i.e. the number of credits is insignificant except in that they give you an indication of how much work they will require.
this.
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orionmoo
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If you pass the module you get all the credits. If you fail you get 0 credits. However the number of credits the module is worth defines what weighting that module has within the context of the whole year. You cannot simply add up all the modules scores and divide by number of modules - what if someone took 10 modules, worth varying amounts of credits, and another took 8 modules worth 15 credits each?

You need to weight each module score by what the module is worth with regards to the whole year.

So achieving 65% in a 30 credit module you need to do 0.65 * 0.25 (30/120). So that modules marks has given you 0.1625 (16.25%) towards you overall mark for the year.

Repeat for each other module and add together. Then you need to times that by what the entire year is worth. So if that's you're 2nd year and it's worth 35%, times whatever mark you have overall by 0.35 and that is your total degree mark to date.
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Tpx
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(Original post by maskofsanity)
No, you don't need to do that if you get all the credits. The methods you and BeanofJelly outlined above are only if you get a portion of the total credits available for that module, e.g. if you got 50% in a 30 credit module, you'd get 15 credits. I have never heard of this before, at my university (and all my friends') you get ALL the credits just for passing, i.e. the number of credits is insignificant except in that they give you an indication of how much work they will require.
The way I'm sure it works is that:

You pass a module, you get all the credits for that module.
You need to get the full number of credits (120) to pass the year and move on to the next.
The score/percentage you get in the module contributes to your final grade, weighted by the year and the number of credits.

Otherwise, wouldn't everyone who completes a degree have 100% / a 1st? Because you need to earn all of the credits to be awarded a degree.

I think we probably have our wires crossed here.
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Parakeet
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Use this,


http://unigradecalc.com/

Absolutely invaluable.
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Parakeet
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You got 53.59% by the way
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EcclesReece
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I've graduated, and I always worked it out like (Let's use 40 credits total per example for simplicity)

Module 1 20 credits - 64%
Module 2 10 credits - 45%
Module 3 10 credits - 50%

I'd always times it by how many credits available.
Basically I'd do a mean:
64 + 64 + 45 + 50 / 4 = 55.75%

It always lined up with my average of the year anyway that Leeds Uni gave me.

Basically I'd do yours:

65 + 65 + 65 + 60 + 60 + 60 + 50 + 44 + 44 + 44 + 43 + 43 / 12 = 53.58% = 54% rounded up

Overcomplicates it, but it always worked for me.

No matter what you argue, the more credits the module is, the more it is worth in the year average overall, hence why you need to work out the weighting. Saying "oh you got all your credits" means sod all, it's your grade what you really want to know.
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maskofsanity
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(Original post by Tpx)
The way I'm sure it works is that:

You pass a module, you get all the credits for that module.
You need to get the full number of credits (120) to pass the year and move on to the next.
The score/percentage you get in the module contributes to your final grade, weighted by the year and the number of credits.

Otherwise, wouldn't everyone who completes a degree have 100% / a 1st? Because you need to earn all of the credits to be awarded a degree.

I think we probably have our wires crossed here.
I'm getting really confused!

I think I'm wrong now
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danny111
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(Original post by Popppppy)
I don't think the credits add any weight to each mark, just add your 5 results and divide by five, so you got 52.4% average, which is a 2.2


How does that logic work? The sole purpose of modules is filling 120 credits and you can choose how many modules you wanna do? (Say 4 30 credits or 12 10 credit ones?????).

Makes no sense, you could put all your effort into your small modules and the one big one you hardly work for because it counts the same anyway...
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