Sholto
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I am currently rechecking the curricula of both degree programmes. I am getting really interested in swapping to maths&econ as soon as the term starts.

Does anyone have any experience with changing courses? Is maths&econ as interesting as I think it would be (does anyone have first-hand experience)?
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Setrith
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(Original post by Sholto)
I am currently rechecking the curricula of both degree programmes. I am getting really interested in swapping to maths&econ as soon as the term starts.

Does anyone have any experience with changing courses? Is maths&econ as interesting as I think it would be (does anyone have first-hand experience)?
Judging by some of your previous posts I'm assuming you're going into first year. Changing courses is generally done at the end of first year, although it's probably not unheard of to change at the start of the year (I've never personally heard of anyone do it, but it might happen so don't take my word for it)

If you're interested in switching make sure you pick MA103 as your outside option, as that gives you a taste of what "proper" university Maths is like. But you have plenty of time to decide, so you could always stick with straight Econ for now, see if you enjoy the Maths modules and then decide at the end of first year if you want to switch or not.
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Swayum
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I agree with the advice above: pick MA103 in first year and just stick with straight Econ - you'll be studying the exact same stuff as Maths + Economics students. If you decide you like maths, and you achieve two 2:1s and two 2:2s, you should be allowed to switch.
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LostAccounti
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Sorry for interrupting the discussion, but I'm an incoming Econ international student. I have read that graduate economic courses prefer more mathematical content in an applicant's UG degree. So I was wondering if it made more sense for me to stick to Econ and take compulsory Macro, or switch to Maths and Econs at the end of the first year, so that I may take up Further Mathematical Methods in L.Algebra and Calc.

What I currently plan to do (subject to many changes as the years pass):

C-Compulsory
E-Elective

Year 1:

C MA100
C EC102
C ST102
E MA103

Year 2:

C EC202
C EC210 (Should I change this for FMM L. Algebra / Calc)
C EC221
E MA203 / MA209

Year 3:

C MA300
C EC319
C EC309 (Plan to request permission for this if all goes well )
C (Another Econ course depending on my particular area of interest after 2 years)

Do you think this will be strong enough for application to a good Master's program in Econ, if I do well? Pretty sure I will need a master's before I can get into a top PhD program, because it's a UK degree.

Thanks for your comments. I value your feedback.
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Swayum
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No, you should definitely stick with straight Economics and pick Further Mathematical Methods instead of MA203/MA209. I think some PhD programmes appreciate you having a knowledge of Real Analysis (MA203), but it's far better to have 2nd year macro + 3rd year macro courses over real analysis. You can pick MA203 + MA209 or whatever in 3rd year if you want to, but it's definitely not a good idea for 2nd year.

As for your other 3rd year options, replace MA300 with a macro based 3rd year paper like International/Monetary/Development. There's absolutely no need for MA300 - yes, game theory is relevant to economics, but you'll cover some of it in EC202 + EC319 - it's far more important to gain actual economics knowledge.

Most important of all is good grades. Your grades matter like 10 times more than your subjects. If you have high marks in all 8 exams in your first 2 years, you will get offers. I know a guy who studied straight Economics and now has MSc Economics offers from LSE, Oxford and Cambridge - he got 4 Firsts in 1st year and 2 Firsts + one very low 2:2 + one very high 2:1 in 2nd year (he picked Further Mathematical Methods in 2nd year + Economic History in 1st year - he did no maths modules in 3rd year).

Ultimately, your views of what you think you want to study/what you think you want to do after the BSc are likely to change over your 3 years at LSE. It's good to have a plan, but don't be too rigid either. I made a post back in 2009 before I started at LSE about exactly which modules I'd pick and I ended up picking very different ones even though I'd given it a LOT of thought back in 2009. You will change as a person at LSE and so will your views. It's part of the learning experience, just don't be closed minded
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LostAccounti
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Thanks a lot, Swayum. I'll definitely be thinking hard about it next year Will taking Level 2 modules in year 3 affect my degree classification?

(Original post by Swayum)
No, you should definitely stick with straight Economics and pick Further Mathematical Methods instead of MA203/MA209. I think some PhD programmes appreciate you having a knowledge of Real Analysis (MA203), but it's far better to have 2nd year macro + 3rd year macro courses over real analysis. You can pick MA203 + MA209 or whatever in 3rd year if you want to, but it's definitely not a good idea for 2nd year.

As for your other 3rd year options, replace MA300 with a macro based 3rd year paper like International/Monetary/Development. There's absolutely no need for MA300 - yes, game theory is relevant to economics, but you'll cover some of it in EC202 + EC319 - it's far more important to gain actual economics knowledge.

Most important of all is good grades. Your grades matter like 10 times more than your subjects. If you have high marks in all 8 exams in your first 2 years, you will get offers. I know a guy who studied straight Economics and now has MSc Economics offers from LSE, Oxford and Cambridge - he got 4 Firsts in 1st year and 2 Firsts + one very low 2:2 + one very high 2:1 in 2nd year (he picked Further Mathematical Methods in 2nd year + Economic History in 1st year - he did no maths modules in 3rd year).

Ultimately, your views of what you think you want to study/what you think you want to do after the BSc are likely to change over your 3 years at LSE. It's good to have a plan, but don't be too rigid either. I made a post back in 2009 before I started at LSE about exactly which modules I'd pick and I ended up picking very different ones even though I'd given it a LOT of thought back in 2009. You will change as a person at LSE and so will your views. It's part of the learning experience, just don't be closed minded
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danny111
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#7
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(Original post by LostAccounti)
Sorry for interrupting the discussion, but I'm an incoming Econ international student. I have read that graduate economic courses prefer more mathematical content in an applicant's UG degree. So I was wondering if it made more sense for me to stick to Econ and take compulsory Macro, or switch to Maths and Econs at the end of the first year, so that I may take up Further Mathematical Methods in L.Algebra and Calc.

What I currently plan to do (subject to many changes as the years pass):

C-Compulsory
E-Elective

Year 1:

C MA100
C EC102
C ST102
E MA103

Year 2:

C EC202
C EC210 (Should I change this for FMM L. Algebra / Calc)
C EC221
E MA203 / MA209

Year 3:

C MA300
C EC319
C EC309 (Plan to request permission for this if all goes well )
C (Another Econ course depending on my particular area of interest after 2 years)

Do you think this will be strong enough for application to a good Master's program in Econ, if I do well? Pretty sure I will need a master's before I can get into a top PhD program, because it's a UK degree.

Thanks for your comments. I value your feedback.
I did EC202, EC210, EC221, and MA203/MA201 in my second year. I second Swayum, you should do macro in year 2. I skipped on MA200 (FMM calc).
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LostAccounti
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Yes, I should have at least one intermediate macro module in my course, now that I think about it. Gives me a broader perspective from econ even though I plan to do more micro-related stuff.

Swayum and danny111, what did you take up as your third year modules?
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danny111
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EC307, EC309, EC321, and EC331.

But I did EME.
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LostAccounti
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I see. Did you apply for any graduate program right after graduation, decide not to attend graduate school ever or decide to work first then attend graduate school? Other alumni can chime in too.
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danny111
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I'm on a Master in Switzerland atm. I also applied to MSc EME, Cambridge MPhil, and Tilburg Econometrics (got offers from all).
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MV=PT
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(Original post by danny111)
I'm on a Master in Switzerland atm. I also applied to MSc EME, Cambridge MPhil, and Tilburg Econometrics (got offers from all).
Do you mind if I ask what and where you are studying in Switzerland ?


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danny111
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(Original post by MV=PT)
Do you mind if I ask what and where you are studying in Switzerland ?


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MiQEF at St. Gallen

http://www.unisg.ch/en/Studium/Maste...Factsheet.aspx
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LostAccounti
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That is a very good place, especially for German businesses.

Are you thinking of going into academia or business after your degree?
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danny111
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(Original post by LostAccounti)
That is a very good place, especially for German businesses.

Are you thinking of going into academia or business after your degree?
the real world.

if i wanted academia i wud have stayed at LSE and do the EME master.
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MV=PT
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(Original post by danny111)
the real world.

if i wanted academia i wud have stayed at LSE and do the EME master.
That place must have an incredible reputation amongst employers if you picked it over Cambridge, what type of industry are you looking to go into after your masters ?
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danny111
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(Original post by MV=PT)
That place must have an incredible reputation amongst employers if you picked it over Cambridge, what type of industry are you looking to go into after your masters ?
Well it has in the German speaking Europe, which is where I want to work, and if I want to work in London I already have LSE on my CV. Ideally I would like to work as a researcher at a bank or an institute. Something empirical.
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Swayum
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(Original post by LostAccounti)
Thanks a lot, Swayum. I'll definitely be thinking hard about it next year Will taking Level 2 modules in year 3 affect my degree classification?
Nope, 2nd year modules have the same weight as 3rd year modules (likewise, picking a 1st year module during your 2nd year means that that 1st year module will have the same weighting as any 2nd/3rd year modules - this is a good way to boost your grade).


(Original post by LostAccounti)
Yes, I should have at least one intermediate macro module in my course, now that I think about it. Gives me a broader perspective from econ even though I plan to do more micro-related stuff.

Swayum and danny111, what did you take up as your third year modules?
I did Maths and Economics:

2nd year: Macro, Micro II, Further Mathematical Methods, Real Analysis, Differential Equations

3rd year: Advanced Economic Analysis, Principles of Econometrics, Complex Analysis, Probability for Finance, Quantitative Finance.
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Timba
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#19
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#19
Econ is for pros that are good at everything
Math&Econ is for people that were only good at maths

LSE EME > LSE Econ > All oxbridge degrees > LSE Math & Econ > All other degrees in UK
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MV=PT
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Is what timba is saying accurate ?



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