Hippokrates
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In your experience when do most doctors have children and when is the best time to have them? Also how many people get pregnant in medical school and what do they do if they are pregnant?
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saguaro123
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im guessing your pregnant? :bhangra::bhangra::bhangra:
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Bill_Gates
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they usually have babies on their lunch break. Maternity ward is usually close by.
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lorry:)
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obviously i have no first hand experience of this, but when i went on work experience there was a specialist registrar who was then pregnant with her third child, her first having been when she was a house officer. i asked her about this and she said that she really wouldn't advise anybody to get pregnant during medical school, but when you start work as a doctor, provided you have a cooperative other half, a decent place to live, and access to child care, it is manageable and she does get to see them a lot eventhough she is doing shift work
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musicmedic
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This was one of my biggest concerns about applying to medicine. I don't really think there is an answer to when the best time is - although during med school (and maybe the two foundation years) may not be the best time to become pregnant perhaps.

I'm starting my Medicine degree in September this year, and I convinced myself that I can have both a career as a doctor and a family. I just have to trust that I will know when the time is right. I would like to hear other peoples opinions though too!
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Hippokrates
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(Original post by mohsanrabbani)
im guessing your pregnant? :bhangra::bhangra::bhangra:
haha nope just curious I guess because medicine brings sacrifices.
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JessaminePoppy
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I know a couple of doctors who have decided that now they're thirty five-ish they have the means to support and care for a child. She really wants one too, but had hesitated before because she was doing specialising exams or something.

As for the medical school pregnancy frequency, I think it depends on the individuals doesn't it?
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Hippokrates
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Just to add I talked to a nurse today who said that she planned not to have a child in August because of all the junior doctors which I thought was quite funny. She also said that after a year the junior doctors are wonderful though.
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SilverArch
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There is actually a book on the subject!!

http://www.amazon.co.uk/you-want-med.../dp/0199237581

I have not read it so I have no idea what it's like although it has great reviews on Amazon. However I know some of the med students on here talked about it a while back. Almost certain some of them have read it

I have thought about this as well
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nexttime
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We had a careers talk yesterday. She gave the impression that CT1 is basically code for baby time. Its when you have a 5 year contract in place, earning a decent amount, not near any critical exams... ideal. After F2 is a natural place for a gap year too, if you wanted to take a year out to have/raise a kid.
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Helenia
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(Original post by nexttime)
We had a careers talk yesterday. She gave the impression that CT1 is basically code for baby time. Its when you have a 5 year contract in place, earning a decent amount, not near any critical exams... ideal. After F2 is a natural place for a gap year too, if you wanted to take a year out to have/raise a kid.
Depends on your specialty. If you're doing a core training programme then you only have 2/3 years in that contract. But it does seem that a lot of my friends are starting to sprog up in the last year or so.

It's never going to be massively easy, but in general, whenever you decide to do it, you'll find a way of coping.
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polldoll
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Someone in my year had a baby in Xmas holidays of 1st year and then continued with the rest of her year.

Otherwise most doctors that have babies that I know do this after foundation years. Some specialities are better for mat leave and part time than others.


This was posted from The Student Room's iPhone/iPad App
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Carpediemxx
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I know a girl in my year who has had a baby through medical school. And i thought i had it bad....major respect for this person
Since numbers of female doctors are due to overtake men very soon, i imagine the ability to have kids will get easier in the next 20 years
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Hippokrates
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(Original post by Carpediemxx)
I know a girl in my year who has had a baby through medical school. And i thought i had it bad....major respect for this person
Since numbers of female doctors are due to overtake men very soon, i imagine the ability to have kids will get easier in the next 20 years
Wow she must be proud of her achievements I think I'd be stressed just doing the degree. That's good news thanks.
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Rooroo96
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Wanted to get this thread going again, I have an offer for Medicine in September and I'm very worried because motherhood is something I've dreamt of my whole life, family will always come first! yet medicine really is where I see myself, some people have mentioned starting a family after the 2 foundation years which sounds great! What specialisms are beat for working mums? I've heard ophthalmology, dermatology and GP's, can anyone think of anything else?

I read a really nice article that both complement each other well, as the skills learned from dealing with difficult patients helps you deal with screaming/misbehaving kids for example and the idea of patient comes first is similar to putting your child's needs before yours - it was very interesting
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Helenia
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(Original post by Rooroo96)
Wanted to get this thread going again, I have an offer for Medicine in September and I'm very worried because motherhood is something I've dreamt of my whole life, family will always come first! yet medicine really is where I see myself, some people have mentioned starting a family after the 2 foundation years which sounds great! What specialisms are beat for working mums? I've heard ophthalmology, dermatology and GP's, can anyone think of anything else?

I read a really nice article that both complement each other well, as the skills learned from dealing with difficult patients helps you deal with screaming/misbehaving kids for example and the idea of patient comes first is similar to putting your child's needs before yours - it was very interesting
GP is the obvious one, but more and more hospital specialties are becoming more family-friendly. Derm is probably a good one but you do have to do Core Medical Training first and that's pretty hellish. Don't know much about ophthalmology I'm afraid. Paeds and Obs & gynae have quite a lot of female trainees and so have had to adapt more quickly than some other specialties, and from my own experience I think (hope!) anaesthetics is pretty good for being flexible.

Not sure about all that "complementary" stuff though. You may learn a few useful communication/negotiating strategies (though what works on aggressive angry adults doesn't always work on tantruming toddlers!) but I don't think being a doctor makes you better than any other mother at putting your children first.
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Inspired_tem
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I think everyone should read this. It's basically women giving there accounts of getting pregnant while doing foundation years and basically how they dealt with it and what they'd advise.
http://www.foundationprogramme.nhs.u...n_Families.pdf
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lxm177
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(Original post by Inspired_tem)
I think everyone should read this. It's basically women giving there accounts of getting pregnant while doing foundation years and basically how they dealt with it and what they'd advise.
http://www.foundationprogramme.nhs.u...n_Families.pdf
Just wanted to thank you for this link! As a married (but currently childless) 29yr old about to start a GEM course in Sept this was hugely helpful, insightful and very reassuring :-)
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Medtutor
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Just visiting the site as I am running a course on how to get into medicine but I saw this thread and thought I could help...

I am 36 yo and have a fabulous career as a GP and in Medical Education. I have 3 children (7,5,15 months). I trained less than full time after foundation years and it worked brilliantly for me. I am married to a consultant Anaesthetist and we really do have a lovely life. It is all possible, just remember not to leave having children too late if it is really what you want and choose your speciality wisely!

Good luck
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derma2019
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interesting read, thanks guys!
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