This discussion is closed.
HaveADesmond
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#1
I'll explain my situation and hopefully someone who is more acquainted with the current jobs market could help me out here.

I have a 2:2 degree from UCL in Economics. People always feel that the 2:2 part needs some explanation, so I'll try my best. My course was going brilliantly until the third year, when I was having relationship troubles with my girlfriend of 6 years, and we ended up breaking up. Whilst I was getting 1st and 2:1 results in my first two years, in my third I had quite simply lost all interest in my course and my mind was constantly elsewhere. I understand that people don't care much for personal issues like this, but in short, this is the reason why I graduated in 2011 with a 2:2. When I graduated, I was still uninterested in any prospect of a career and anything associated with it. I lived with a friend in Italy for 6 months, and now I'm back in the UK. Worked in a shop for 3 months back here, quite satisfied with everything and only just recently starting thinking about a career again, and it feels like I've finally got over everything. Trouble is, my degree seems to be worthless. It is not a good time to graduate, and it's certainly not a good time to be graduating with a 2:2. That being said, my GCSEs are quite good (8A*, 2A); as are my A-levels (AAAA). My extracurriculars are also good and I've taught myself two languages on the side whilst at college and university.

I shouldn't really complain because it's not easy for anybody out there, but I do feel like I've just failed at the final hurdle and there is a definite sense of injustice here. Some will say I deserve it for getting a sh*t grade, that's fine. My question is: should I just basically give up on a career in accountancy? Would I be wasting my time? Like I said, I've not been interested for a good while so I'm looking for some practical advice on what avenues might still be open to me, what I could do, etc. What other fields should I consider?
11
DaneCook
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#2
Report 7 years ago
#2
I feel bad for you brah. Stellar academic record only to be shafted by the missus in the final year.

It's funny and sad at the same time :lol:.

I don't have much advice for you except, carry on with the traditional route of applying for grad schemes and hope you get your foot in somewhere, somehow.

Bonne Chance.

PS. Your username is hilarious.
11
philistine
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#3
Report 7 years ago
#3
So you let a vagina destroy your academic record, mental well-being, and perhaps even all future career prospects?

You dun' goofed.
39
HaveADesmond
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#4
(Original post by philistine)
So you let a vagina destroy your academic record, mental well-being, and perhaps even all future career prospects?

You dun' goofed.

I certainly have.
2
shortandsweet
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#5
Report 7 years ago
#5
A 2:2 is certainly not the end of the world, and perhaps you should emphasise on your cv that you had good grades in your first two years. I didnt do economics personally, but im sure that smaller firms will consider you. Being recently new to the job market too, I've realised that work experience counts for eveything. There are plenty of recent graduates who went to "rubbish" unis and got 2:2s who are in very confortable jobs.
1
HaveADesmond
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#6
(Original post by DaneCook)
I feel bad for you brah. Stellar academic record only to be shafted by the missus in the final year.

It's funny and sad at the same time :lol:.

I don't have much advice for you except, carry on with the traditional route of applying for grad schemes and hope you get your foot in somewhere, somehow.

Bonne Chance.

PS. Your username is hilarious.
Thanks on all fronts.
0
poohat
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#7
Report 7 years ago
#7
Consider applying for a masters at Oxbridge/LSE, write a convincing cover letter that explains your situation and stress how good your grades were in 1st/2nd year before you had problems. You might get lucky.

If you get a good masters degree from one of those universities then it may help to overwrite your undergrad record, to some extent.
2
DaneCook
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#8
Report 7 years ago
#8
(Original post by HaveADesmond)
Thanks on all fronts.
No worries man.

(Original post by philistine)
So you let a vagina destroy your academic record, mental well-being, and perhaps even all future career prospects?

You dun' goofed.
He defo dun' goofed. I'd be celibate if that **** didn't feel so good.
0
Observatory
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#9
Report 7 years ago
#9
(Original post by HaveADesmond)
My question is: should I just basically give up on a career in accountancy?
This is one of the few professions where a 2.2 isn't necessarily a show-stopper, but you won't be able to start on a Big 4 graduate scheme. Some of the smaller firms accept 2.2s onto their non-graduate entry tracks.
0
Ape Gone Insane
Badges: 15
#10
Report 7 years ago
#10
(Original post by Observatory)
This is one of the few professions where a 2.2 isn't necessarily a show-stopper, but you won't be able to start on a Big 4 graduate scheme.
PwC have an 'Inspired Talent' entry route if your academics fall short of the requirements but you have to have done something 'amazing'.
0
Observatory
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#11
Report 7 years ago
#11
(Original post by Ape Gone Insane)
PwC have an 'Inspired Talent' entry route if your academics fall short of the requirements but you have to have done something 'amazing'.
Ah yeah, there is that. Although their definition of "amazing" is rather more extreme than "decent ECs and probably should have gotten a 2.1 if not for <whatever>". Apparently.
2
HaveADesmond
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#12
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#12
(Original post by Observatory)
This is one of the few professions where a 2.2 isn't necessarily a show-stopper, but you won't be able to start on a Big 4 graduate scheme. Some of the smaller firms accept 2.2s onto their non-graduate entry tracks.
Thanks, I'll take a look.
0
Narcissist
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#13
Report 7 years ago
#13
It's certainly going to make it harder to get a job but if you apply to enough firms you're sure to get something eventually. A lot of smaller firms won't be quite as focussed on degree classification, provided you know why you didn't achieve highly and what you can do to do better in the future you can still come across well in an interview.

Here's a list from ICAEW of places that will accept a 2:2. Obviously most places will be filled by now but it's a decent starting point. ICAEW Vacancies
0
kka25
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#14
Report 7 years ago
#14
(Original post by HaveADesmond)
I'll explain my situation and hopefully someone who is more acquainted with the current jobs market could help me out here.

I have a 2:2 degree from UCL in Economics. People always feel that the 2:2 part needs some explanation, so I'll try my best. My course was going brilliantly until the third year, when I was having relationship troubles with my girlfriend of 6 years, and we ended up breaking up. Whilst I was getting 1st and 2:1 results in my first two years, in my third I had quite simply lost all interest in my course and my mind was constantly elsewhere. I understand that people don't care much for personal issues like this, but in short, this is the reason why I graduated in 2011 with a 2:2. When I graduated, I was still uninterested in any prospect of a career and anything associated with it. I lived with a friend in Italy for 6 months, and now I'm back in the UK. Worked in a shop for 3 months back here, quite satisfied with everything and only just recently starting thinking about a career again, and it feels like I've finally got over everything. Trouble is, my degree seems to be worthless. It is not a good time to graduate, and it's certainly not a good time to be graduating with a 2:2. That being said, my GCSEs are quite good (8A*, 2A); as are my A-levels (AAAA). My extracurriculars are also good and I've taught myself two languages on the side whilst at college and university.

I shouldn't really complain because it's not easy for anybody out there, but I do feel like I've just failed at the final hurdle and there is a definite sense of injustice here. Some will say I deserve it for getting a sh*t grade, that's fine. My question is: should I just basically give up on a career in accountancy? Would I be wasting my time? Like I said, I've not been interested for a good while so I'm looking for some practical advice on what avenues might still be open to me, what I could do, etc. What other fields should I consider?
I do feel a sense of sympathy for you OP :console:

According to the information you gave (grades in school, A-Level, and 1st and 2nd year results), you sound to be a very intelligent and able person, so in my view, don't stop. You've learned your mistakes and that will make you an even better and wiser person. You can't change anything now but you can use the things you gained to move to the next steps of life; so, move on and plan the next step of success!
0
HaveADesmond
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#15
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#15
Thanks, I appreciate all the links. I'd be grateful to hear from anyone working in recruitment or someone who has been in a similar position to hear what they have to say about my chances.
0
Mister Dead
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#16
Report 7 years ago
#16
Hi,

this converstion has come up a few times as i had a couple of friends that got 2.2. I can't speak specifically re. economics, but the general advice from friends that have been involved in recruitment is:

Apply regardless of whether positions have a minimum grade requirement.

most positions (in the experience of my friends) have been filled with these priorities:

1. Is the interviewee capable of doing the job/course
2. Will they fit into the team/establishment whatever
3. Which uni and what grade (as much a tie-breaker for suitable candidates)

and remember that there are tonnes of people out there with a 1st/2.1 that are in mororless the same position.

Charisma, and who you know, not what really does count for a lot. Get out there and make some noise. Good luck.
0
Palatial Veranda
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#17
Report 7 years ago
#17
My best friend just came out of a good university (Cambridge - Maths) with a 2:2. It was a middle-of-the-road 2:2 aswell and he managed to secure a position with Merrill Lynch. They grilled him like a sausage about the 2:2 but hey, he got the job.

2:2 at UCL, I certainly wouldn't say that all the doors are closed.
2
Rancorous
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#18
Report 7 years ago
#18
Think you should be ok. Buff up the 1st and 2nd year results. You're explaining it the right way; 'I always performed above average in tutorials and classes, I scored firsts and good 2:1s throughout university in essays and examinations. I then had some health problems and family issues before my final year exams'.

Then be creative about your circumstances if you're grilled on them. But do not focus on negativity.

I think you learnt from your degree you have to do things you're interested in if you want to succeed. My school academics were the same as yours, but I struggled with my subject the whole time as I had no interest in it. I very easily could have ended up with a 2:2 if I had botched the final year a bit.

If you really want to be an accountant, or whatever, my sole bit of advice will be doing work experience, more work experience - anything related to it - and make speculative applications.
0
PoorRichBoy
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#19
Report 7 years ago
#19
A similar thing happened to a friend of mine who read Law at Durham. Though he was doing a Law degree for the ££ and had no interest in the subject. This led to him achieving 54% overall - close to a mid 2.2.

Though he had lots of financial experience with regards to financial advisory, law, investment banking operations, accountancy and good ECs and other things to boast his CV.

He moved back home to Manchester and found a job as a trainee private client stockbroker/investment manager. He's currently earning about £28k as a trainee and being sponsored to some investment qualifications. His salary is equivalent to about £40k in London terms and more his rent is quite cheap as he lives at home.

From this you can see a 2:2 is not the end of the world. Experience > Degree.
0
gingerbreadman85
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#20
Report 7 years ago
#20
Imperial - Msci Chemistry 2.2

Did my PGCE at Cambridge, now a qualified Chemistry teacher doing a part time Masters. I love my job, but probably would have never been a teacher if i'd got a 2.1, i'd be doing some better payed, less time consuming job in Pharma, or a PhD. Probably be bored stiff all the time.

There is something out there for you.
2
X
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

It is really important for me to be involved in helping make my university better

Strongly disagree (15)
9.68%
Disagree (11)
7.1%
Neither agree or disagree (50)
32.26%
Agree (59)
38.06%
Strongly Agree (20)
12.9%

Watched Threads

View All