simibean
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#1
Out of a physical geography degree and human geography degree which one is a better degree, and what is taught in each one?
0
reply
greenfly125
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#2
Report 7 years ago
#2
You need to look at courses from a few unis that you may be interested in, because the content varies. I have found that the content of human geography at A-Level is completely different to degree level. Much more of a social science.

As for which is better, it depends on the eye of the beholder. And it also depends what career field you want to go into. Arguably, physical offers more open doors.
1
reply
pseudonymegg
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#3
Report 7 years ago
#3
I would think physical is more respected also you can get more involved with volcanoes, earthquakes etc wooo
3
reply
daviddd!1994
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#4
Report 7 years ago
#4
Physical is more scientific eg. volcanoes, glaciers, landforms etc, whilst human is more of a social science about urbanisation, farming systems, population statistics etc. I would say neither is more respected, they just lead into different sorts of careers. Physical is more likely taken as a BSc at university whilst human a BA. My brother hopes to study human geography next year and perhaps go into urban planning or something in that field when he graduates. However I know alot of physical geography graduates often obtain work in the oil industry and also surveying.

It just really depends on whether your a scientific guy or a more of an arts person and what sort of job you want
1
reply
smile:D
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#5
Report 7 years ago
#5
You can typically do human aspects in physical geography and vice versa, so there are opportunities to do both. If you do human you'll get a BA degree usually, whereas if you do physical you'll get a BSc (science degree). Some unis ask for one or more science for physical (e.g. Durham) but most have no preferred a levels for BA geography (except geography obviously )

Doing a BSc might open more doors, but it ultimately depends on what you enjoy the most
1
reply
Smileymiley
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#6
Report 6 years ago
#6
Physical is waaaay more interesting ! x
3
reply
GooglyEyedMonster
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#7
Report 6 years ago
#7
I biased as a physical geographer :P You will soon see when you get to Uni they almost become two different and competitive subjects!

Anyhows, as has been said, the main difference is that human is an arts and physical is a science. You do different modules but usually come under the same department.

Think of the type of geography you do at school and college/6th form. Did you prefer physical processes like rivers, volcanoes, weather, ice or did you prefer development, population, sustainability, human impacts etc.

In most places, you have the opportunity to delve into the other side (theres a divide between the two types of geographers :P) but the majority of your credits will be taken in the type that suit you. So in my first year I did a human module because it sounded interesting. Since then I've done all physical modules.

As to what is taught in each one, it depends completely on the staff each Uni has. So at my Uni we have a lot of climate scientists, peat bogs, hydrology and cryosphere. Only this year have we had someone capable of teaching weather. The specialisms of the staff will be reflected in the module choices. (I have no idea what human specialists we have...)

So yea, first work out which degree you want: physical or human. Then go to each of the Uni's you want to apply for and look at staff specialisms and/or modules available.
1
reply
simibean
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#8
(Original post by GooglyEyedMonster)
I biased as a physical geographer :P You will soon see when you get to Uni they almost become two different and competitive subjects!

Anyhows, as has been said, the main difference is that human is an arts and physical is a science. You do different modules but usually come under the same department.

Think of the type of geography you do at school and college/6th form. Did you prefer physical processes like rivers, volcanoes, weather, ice or did you prefer development, population, sustainability, human impacts etc.

In most places, you have the opportunity to delve into the other side (theres a divide between the two types of geographers :P) but the majority of your credits will be taken in the type that suit you. So in my first year I did a human module because it sounded interesting. Since then I've done all physical modules.

As to what is taught in each one, it depends completely on the staff each Uni has. So at my Uni we have a lot of climate scientists, peat bogs, hydrology and cryosphere. Only this year have we had someone capable of teaching weather. The specialisms of the staff will be reflected in the module choices. (I have no idea what human specialists we have...)

So yea, first work out which degree you want: physical or human. Then go to each of the Uni's you want to apply for and look at staff specialisms and/or modules available.
Thanks for replying. I am planning to apply for a physical degree, as I enjoy the topics more than human and my A levels are more relevant-sciences & maths.
What university are you at, what ones did you apply for? What are you planning to do after your degree?
0
reply
GooglyEyedMonster
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#9
Report 6 years ago
#9
(Original post by simibean)
Thanks for replying. I am planning to apply for a physical degree, as I enjoy the topics more than human and my A levels are more relevant-sciences & maths.
What university are you at, what ones did you apply for? What are you planning to do after your degree?
I'm at Exeter, I applied to Cambridge, Keele, Liverpool and Kingston (but Exeter, Liverpool and Keele were combined honours degree's which is what I wanted to do)

Erm, well my degree ends in a little over 12 weeks. I've applied for PhD's as that is ultimately what I want to do, but funding is real competitive so my back up are graduate jobs in consultancy and as a hydro-analyst. And if that fails (which is possible in todays world) I will work in a supermarket (or other job) for a year, save for a masters, do my masters which will make it easier to get a PhD and yea, the circle starts again.

The beauty of a physical geog degree is that it opens many more doors than a human one as you are still able to apply for the same jobs as them plus you can apply to more more scienc-y jobs. So in my case, consultancy can be applied for by both geographers, but only physical's can apply for the hydro analyst job.
0
reply
greenfly125
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#10
Report 6 years ago
#10
(Original post by daviddd!1994)
Physical is more scientific eg. volcanoes, glaciers, landforms etc, whilst human is more of a social science about urbanisation, farming systems, population statistics etc.
You have a really distorted A-Level view about what Human Geography actually involves. I have studied at university various human topics, these involve, the geography of; travel, feminism, identity, literature, mobility, postcolonialism, moving away from home, institutions, colonisation. It's definitely more than just populations, health and cities.
1
reply
daviddd!1994
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#11
Report 6 years ago
#11
(Original post by greenfly125)
You have a really distorted A-Level view about what Human Geography actually involves. I have studied at university various human topics, these involve, the geography of; travel, feminism, identity, literature, mobility, postcolonialism, moving away from home, institutions, colonisation. It's definitely more than just populations, health and cities.
Simmer.
0
reply
returnmigrant
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#12
Report 6 years ago
#12
Anyone else still pondering this dilemma or thinking about Geography applications for 2014 entry, should also look at subjects that are geography based but have different titles, like Development Studies, Demography, Population Studies, Environmental Studies, Earth Sciences and 'area' studies like American Studies, Latin American Studies etc etc. Sometimes these can be more interesting than a straight Geography degree. Also dont forget to look for courses with a Year Abroad - always great for anyone interested in geography in any form.
1
reply
purple_fox27
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#13
Report 6 years ago
#13
It really depends on your interests - obviously if you like rocks and soil and the mechanics of natural disasters then go for physical geography. Or if you're more interested in development, culture, urbanisation then go for the human geography. BUT most unis will allow you to dabble in a bit of both, for example, if you do a human geog degree you can probably still take some physical geography modules which interest you. Also, think about what sort of career you want - e.g. do you want do something involving scientific research? Or do you want to work in policy?

Some unis also don't require you to choose when you start which could be better for you if you can't choose. For example, I think my friend at Manchester went for just Geography, but come 2nd/3rd year their modules determined whether it was BA or BSc. There are also combined degrees...I'm at Aberystwyth and I do BSc Geography (F800) where you're required to do a mixture of human and physical geography in 1st and 2nd year...then in 3rd you can pick whatever interests you.

I also read somewhere that social/cultural geographers are more employable
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of Bradford
    Undergraduate and Postgraduate Open day Postgraduate
    Thu, 24 Oct '19
  • Cardiff University
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Sat, 26 Oct '19
  • Brunel University London
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Sat, 26 Oct '19

Would you turn to a teacher if you were being bullied?

Yes (65)
23.3%
No (214)
76.7%

Watched Threads

View All