Clare~Bear
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#1
Someone in my biology class said that because they have asperges, they can qualify for en-suite accomodation at uni (not sure if it's any or just some), for the same price as standard accomodation! :eek: But he doesn't seem that bad. He is a bit eccentric, but we didn't actually know he had a medical condition (apserges) until a few months into the course, when he told us!

Is it really that easy to exagerate any kind of illness or mild disability with unis?

Or are they just talking rubbish?

I have spina bifida, but it doesn't really affect me - I think it just makes my back a bit weaker/less flexible. I'm lucky though, most people with it are in wheel-chairs cos the operation fails a lot of the time. I didn't even mention it to my sixth form at first as the person I enrolled with said that if it doesn't affect my learning or movement around the college then it doesn't matter. But a few weeks into sixth form, we were given a sheet with our details, so that we could change any errors. My form tutor told me to put it on there, along with my hydrocephalus (if that's how you spell it. This effects me even less than SB.) because it would be passed onto my uni - but why? I don't want to be treated any differently. Ok, it would be nice to get cheaper accomodation, but I'm too honest a person and would feel like I'm cheating the system. And it's not something like epilepsy, where I can suddenly have a fit - so having epilepsy on my record would tell them whats happening to me.
4
reply
Juno
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#2
Report 7 years ago
#2
It doesn't really go on disability as such, they look at what needs you have that other students don't. So for the person with aspergers, if it's bad enough that they really can't share a bathroom they may get en-suite cheaper - because they're having extra costs as a result of their disability. But that doesn't mean everyone with aspergers is automatically entitled.

And no, it's not easy to exaggerate because they need evidence, like medical notes.

If your SB means you find climbing stairs harder you may be given groundfloor accommodation, or somewhere with a lift, or things like that. If you find carrying things is difficult then you might get more photocopying allowance, so you can photocopy bits out of textbooks rather than having to carry big heavy books home.

But you won't just get cheaper accommodation if there's no reason for it.
0
reply
Clare~Bear
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#3
(Original post by Juno)
It doesn't really go on disability as such, they look at what needs you have that other students don't. So for the person with aspergers, if it's bad enough that they really can't share a bathroom they may get en-suite cheaper - because they're having extra costs as a result of their disability. But that doesn't mean everyone with aspergers is automatically entitled.

And no, it's not easy to exaggerate because they need evidence, like medical notes.

If your SB means you find climbing stairs harder you may be given groundfloor accommodation, or somewhere with a lift, or things like that. If you find carrying things is difficult then you might get more photocopying allowance, so you can photocopy bits out of textbooks rather than having to carry big heavy books home.

But you won't just get cheaper accommodation if there's no reason for it.
He isn't that bad though. He is a bit eccentric, but we didn't realise he actually had something (asperges) until a few months after meeting him. Thats why I'm asking this. because if he's telling the truth, then they just automatically assume that you have the worst kind of that illness.
0
reply
Juno
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#4
Report 7 years ago
#4
(Original post by Clare~Bear)
He isn't that bad though. He is a bit eccentric, but we didn't realise he actually had something (asperges) until a few months after meeting him. Thats why I'm asking this. because if he's telling the truth, then they just automatically assume that you have the worst kind of that illness.
Nope, he'd have to really prove he can't share a bathroom with others to be eligible - although I suppose he could possibly argue that the reason you didn't know was because you don't live with him But if he doesn't have the extra need himself and is just going by the fact that other people have it (if that makes sense) then he wont qualify.
0
reply
AlmostChicGeek
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#5
Report 7 years ago
#5
(Original post by Clare~Bear)
He isn't that bad though. He is a bit eccentric, but we didn't realise he actually had something (asperges) until a few months after meeting him. Thats why I'm asking this. because if he's telling the truth, then they just automatically assume that you have the worst kind of that illness.
You can't know how badly someone suffers from something, and you can refuse extra support if you don't need it.

I am given extra time in exams due to my longterm condition, and they class it as a disability, even though I can usually do things normally. I'm in permanent pain at least until they can fix me, but you wouldn't see it if you were looking at me, only if I told you. But it can make it very difficult to concentrate, and I have missed university because it has been so bad.
4
reply
Tiger Rag
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#6
Report 7 years ago
#6
(Original post by Clare~Bear)
Someone in my biology class said that because they have asperges, they can qualify for en-suite accomodation at uni (not sure if it's any or just some), for the same price as standard accomodation! :eek: But he doesn't seem that bad. He is a bit eccentric, but we didn't actually know he had a medical condition (apserges) until a few months into the course, when he told us!
I have Autism, and Aspergers is a form of Autism. Just because it's not visible (such as being a wheelchair user) doesn't mean it's not that bad.

It may not seem that bad; but it can be. Many people with Aspergers / Autism have sensory issues. This means that our senses are either too sensitive or too undersensitive. Again, you don't know how bad it is until they tell you. In fact, you may not even know they have these issues.

Is it really that easy to exagerate any kind of illness or mild disability with unis?
How do you know he's exaggerating? Are you medically trained? Did you do his assessment? Do you have access to his medical records? Are you with him 24/7 to know what he's like?

Your ignorance is unbelievable. You can't look at someone and know they have Aspergers, whereas it's sometimes obvious if someone has a visual impairment. (I'm lucky this isn't true for me. A relative says it's hell knowing that people can see that her eyes are just black) Because of people like you, many of us pretend to act normal.
4
reply
Clare~Bear
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#7
(Original post by OU Student)
I have Autism, and Aspergers is a form of Autism. Just because it's not visible (such as being a wheelchair user) doesn't mean it's not that bad.

It may not seem that bad; but it can be. Many people with Aspergers / Autism have sensory issues. This means that our senses are either too sensitive or too undersensitive. Again, you don't know how bad it is until they tell you. In fact, you may not even know they have these issues.



How do you know he's exaggerating? Are you medically trained? Did you do his assessment? Do you have access to his medical records? Are you with him 24/7 to know what he's like?

Your ignorance is unbelievable. You can't look at someone and know they have Aspergers, whereas it's sometimes obvious if someone has a visual impairment. (I'm lucky this isn't true for me. A relative says it's hell knowing that people can see that her eyes are just black) Because of people like you, many of us pretend to act normal.
You're the ignorant one. You dont know this person. Ive known him for two years. He said that gge can't believe what they're offering him, considering how mild his asperges is, so if they do probe him, he'll exaggerate it.
1
reply
Tiger Rag
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#8
Report 7 years ago
#8
(Original post by Clare~Bear)
You're the ignorant one. You dont know this person. Ive known him for two years. He said that gge can't believe what they're offering him, considering how mild his asperges is, so if they do probe him, he'll exaggerate it.
How is knowing more about a developmental disorder ignorant? You're the ignorant one. You honestly have no idea what Aspergers is at all. Oh, and some of us manage to hide it.

Just because someone manages to hide it, doesn't mean they don't have problems.
0
reply
Clare~Bear
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#9
(Original post by OU Student)
How is knowing more about a developmental disorder ignorant? You're the ignorant one. You honestly have no idea what Aspergers is at all. Oh, and some of us manage to hide it.

Just because someone manages to hide it, doesn't mean they don't have problems.
How do you know that you know more about it? Or how do you know that I haven't got someone in the family with it? Or that many of my family members work in the NHS, and most of those work in mental health!
0
reply
AlmostChicGeek
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#10
Report 7 years ago
#10
(Original post by Clare~Bear)
How do you know that you know more about it? Or how do you know that I haven't got someone in the family with it? Or that many of my family members work in the NHS, and most of those work in mental health!
If you do have someone in the family with it etc. then I feel bad for them because you do appear to be completely ignorant and unsympathetic towards the condition. And if your family members do work in mental health, then I hope they don't talk about it to your if this is your attitude, because that would mean that they have a similar attitude to you.
0
reply
username457532
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#11
Report 7 years ago
#11
(Original post by Clare~Bear)
He isn't that bad though. He is a bit eccentric, but we didn't realise he actually had something (asperges) until a few months after meeting him. Thats why I'm asking this. because if he's telling the truth, then they just automatically assume that you have the worst kind of that illness.
A lot of the people I went to school with didn't know I had mental health problems and if they did they wouldn't have known how my ED affects my digestive system. This doesn't mean that it doesn't or that it would affect everyone in the same way. So don't just assume that because you can't see something it isn't there. This guy may be downplaying his disability to you because it could be embarrassing to say how much it affects him.
0
reply
Clare~Bear
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#12
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#12
(Original post by AlmostChicGeek)
.
(Original post by SmallTownGirl)
.

I am sympathetic towards both of them. The person in my family has it a lot worse that this guy in biology. If he was embarassed about it, then why would he tell us about it in the first place. Like I said, everyone just thought he was a bit eccentric and loud - but most people are in some ways and lots of confidant people are loud.
0
reply
Tiger Rag
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#13
Report 7 years ago
#13
(Original post by SmallTownGirl)
This guy may be downplaying his disability to you because it could be embarrassing to say how much it affects him.
Exactly. I've had to hide mine because of the attitudes I've had from some. Apparently, it can't be that bad because I've just been diagnosed.:mad:
0
reply
Clare~Bear
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#14
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#14
(Original post by OU Student)
Exactly. I've had to hide mine because of the attitudes I've had from some. Apparently, it can't be that bad because I've just been diagnosed.:mad:
Then why was he happy to tell us all about it. Like I've said, we just thought he was a bit eccentric, but lots of people are. It's not like we chained him up and tortured him to tell us why he sometimes acts a bit odd, because some people are just like that and have nothing wrong with them.
0
reply
chai wallah
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#15
Report 7 years ago
#15
FFS OP, stop being a ****.
4
reply
River85
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#16
Report 7 years ago
#16
(Original post by Clare~Bear)
Is it really that easy to exagerate any kind of illness or mild disability with unis?

Or are they just talking rubbish?
He would have provided medical evidence and possibly a psychologist's report. Someone with Asperger's usually doesn't cope well with change and can find social interaction difficult. It may be that he has coping mechanisms in place, or is downplaying his Asperger's. However, university is a major change and this can bring significant pressure, especially to a person with Asperger's. Perhaps he isn't cheating the system but making sure that he has all the support in place and is trying to make this change as stress free as possible?

I have spina bifida, but it doesn't really affect me - I think it just makes my back a bit weaker/less flexible. I'm lucky though, most people with it are in wheel-chairs cos the operation fails a lot of the time. I didn't even mention it to my sixth form at first as the person I enrolled with said that if it doesn't affect my learning or movement around the college then it doesn't matter. But a few weeks into sixth form, we were given a sheet with our details, so that we could change any errors. My form tutor told me to put it on there, along with my hydrocephalus (if that's how you spell it. This effects me even less than SB.) because it would be passed onto my uni - but why? I don't want to be treated any differently. Ok, it would be nice to get cheaper accomodation, but I'm too honest a person and would feel like I'm cheating the system. And it's not something like epilepsy, where I can suddenly have a fit - so having epilepsy on my record would tell them whats happening to me.
I would strongly advise you speak to the disability support team at the university you will attend to discuss any support and arrangements that can be made. It might also be worth applying for Disabled Students Allowance. I appreciate you don't want to be treated differently, and you probably won't. It's just designed to give youwhat are ultimately small, but important, the reasonable adjustments and support that you might need to reach your potential.

If you feel you that there aren't any adjustments or support that can be put into place then this will become obvious when you have your Needs Assessment (where support is discussed with a DSA adviser). However, you haven't started university yet so it's quite difficult to know for sure that you won't need any adjustments or support. That's why it's best you discuss this with an adviser.

Edit: - And, to answer the question in the thread title, a disability is, in a techincal and general sense, any condition (physical or mental) that affects a person's ability to do day to day activities (e.g. social interaction, walk a certain distance, carry objects, eat, wash and so on). Spina bifida can therefore meet this definition.
2
reply
Tiger Rag
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#17
Report 7 years ago
#17
(Original post by Clare~Bear)
How do you know that you know more about it? Or how do you know that I haven't got someone in the family with it? Or that many of my family members work in the NHS, and most of those work in mental health!
If you knew anything about Autism / Aspergers, you'd know it's a spectrum disorder and that everyone is affected differently. I have a friend whose son is on the spectrum. He loves change (but needs routine) yet, I have a friend who hates change and needs routine. I'm not overly fussed, as long as I know what's coming.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • Bournemouth University
    Midwifery Open Day at Portsmouth Campus Undergraduate
    Wed, 16 Oct '19
  • Teesside University
    All faculties open Undergraduate
    Wed, 16 Oct '19
  • University of the Arts London
    London College of Fashion – Cordwainers Footwear and Bags & Accessories Undergraduate
    Wed, 16 Oct '19

How has the start of this academic year been for you?

Loving it - gonna be a great year (113)
17.77%
It's just nice to be back! (173)
27.2%
Not great so far... (227)
35.69%
I want to drop out! (123)
19.34%

Watched Threads

View All