Rollerblading/Skating; help? Watch

kka25
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I'm planning to learn rollerblading and would want to invest some money to buy myself a good (novice) rollerblades; any tips on which would be the best investment, and how to actually start rollerblading?

I did learn it once but I was 9-10 years old at that time and I was no good at all :/ I went skating with some friends at Manchester last year and I was just dead awful; it was embarrassing!

So, maybe I could teach myself rollerblading on the grass lol I'm terrified of falling! :ninja: Any tips would be highly appreciated.

*Mods, don't know where to put this; so I think this is the best place to put it.
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pinkangelgirl
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erm, i bought a pair of rollerblades because i used to ice skate.

firstly, the grass is a nono- definitely wont be able to rollerblad on the grass.

you need to find a nice stretch of pavement or an empty car park or something to practise- and if your scared, then wear shin pads etc
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kka25
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(Original post by pinkangelgirl)

firstly, the grass is a nono- definitely wont be able to rollerblad on the grass.

you need to find a nice stretch of pavement or an empty car park or something to practise- and if your scared, then wear shin pads etc
Owh, no : ( Why not on the grass? lol; then maybe I should just try it in my room first?

Would it still hurt (a lot) if you fell, even if you were the shin pads?
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Scoobiedoobiedo
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When you say rollerblades, do you mean recreational rollerblades or inline skates?

You can't learn to skate until you accept you will fall over. Lots at first, less over time but it still happens from time to time.

I ice skate so not sure about falling over roller blading, but ice doesn't hurt so I doubt it will hurt too much. Having said that I suppose it depends on your pain threshold. Get pads/a helmet if you're worried.

You can't skate on grass, try it and you will find out why. The same with carpet/wooden flooring etc, physics and friction or lack there of.
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Sternumator
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I used to do it a lot. For rollerblades I like roller hockey skates but recreational skates are good too just don't get skates designed for ramps. You want them to fit well and have good wheels and bearings. I went to a big sports hall to start with which was perfect but if you dont have that option then a nice flat quiet car park is good. I cut up my knees a lot on tarmac before I finally brought knee pads, they are a good idea. The best surface I went on was a rollerhockey hall, the grip was amazing.
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kka25
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(Original post by Scoobiedoobiedo)
When you say rollerblades, do you mean recreational rollerblades or inline skates?

You can't learn to skate until you accept you will fall over. Lots at first, less over time but it still happens from time to time.

I ice skate so not sure about falling over roller blading, but ice doesn't hurt so I doubt it will hurt too much. Having said that I suppose it depends on your pain threshold. Get pads/a helmet if you're worried.

You can't skate on grass, try it and you will find out why. The same with carpet/wooden flooring etc, physics and friction or lack there of.
I can't tell the differences

Ok; I'll swallow the pain (eek) - the reason I'm being paranoid is that I had a very bad experience with skates;my parent had been telling horrible stories about skates and injuries since my childhood; so that got stuck with me until now :/

I ice skated at Manchester once; unfortunately, my 'mates' didn't help me at all learning properly how to skate. One did, and I'm very grateful for her effort; the others are just plane arse :/ I even had a large scare (and bled) because I didn't put the skates on properly :/ erggghhh; total n00b : (

Care to slap me some sense on why I shouldn't skate on grass, carpet and wooded floor?; I think I know why, but I just need to hear it out :[

Sorry for the total n00b question :/

*yeah, when I buy the skates, I will buy the whole set of protections as well! lol.
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Sabertooth
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(Original post by kka25)
I'm planning to learn rollerblading and would want to invest some money to buy myself a good (novice) rollerblades; any tips on which would be the best investment, and how to actually start rollerblading?

I did learn it once but I was 9-10 years old at that time and I was no good at all :/ I went skating with some friends at Manchester last year and I was just dead awful; it was embarrassing!

So, maybe I could teach myself rollerblading on the grass lol I'm terrified of falling! :ninja: Any tips would be highly appreciated.

*Mods, don't know where to put this; so I think this is the best place to put it.
You can't skate on grass because the wheels don't roll smoothly, ditto carpet.The best place to practice is a carpark during closed hours, somewhere with nice smooth ground. If you can't practice there then try in a park, some of them have smooth enough paths.

As for which skates to get, don't go for hockey skates like someone said they like - they have no break and you will need a break, they're also far more specialized than you need. Don't get size adjustable ones. And don't get those cheap ones with the plastic wheels, nothing worse than horrible plastic wheels. Make sure they have good ankle support, I can't stress that enough, they must be able to adjust the ankle to provide enough support - too little and skating's going to be harder. Have a look about and post a pair on here and either I or someone else will be able to tell you if the skates are ok.

If you're worried about pain, make sure you protect yourself. You can get knee, elbow and wrist pads in a set for quite cheap, also wear a helmet, ok you won't look cool but being safe is better than being cool. It is very easy to have both feet slip out from under you on skates and if you fall straight on your head that's a big, big problem.

Skating is easy, anyone can do it - I taught my incredibly uncoordinated girlfriend how to skate in just a few sessions. It's great exercise and it's fantastic fun. You could try looking on the internet for guidance, youtube videos or something like that could probably show you the basics.
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BFT
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(Original post by Sabertooth)
Don't get size adjustable ones.
Are size-adjustable skates not as good? I have tiny size 3 feet and the only skates I've been able to find are the girls' ones for sizes 1-4 :\
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Sabertooth
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(Original post by BFT)
Are size-adjustable skates not as good? I have tiny size 3 feet and the only skates I've been able to find are the girls' ones for sizes 1-4 :\
If it's all you can find, then it's all you can find. :dontknow: (you could probably find some in the US that would fit and import them)

They're generally made of cheap plastic, will fall apart with any amount of decent use, and don't offer proper support where it's needed.
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BFT
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(Original post by Sabertooth)
If it's all you can find, then it's all you can find. :dontknow: (you could probably find some in the US that would fit and import them)

They're generally made of cheap plastic, will fall apart with any amount of decent use, and don't offer proper support where it's needed.
That's a shame. At least they're only £12 in SportsDirect right now, so I can afford to give it a go.
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Sabertooth
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(Original post by BFT)
That's a shame. At least they're only £12 in SportsDirect right now, so I can afford to give it a go.
I don't suppose you can go wrong for £12, if they're crap at least you haven't wasted much money.

They'll probably have the horrible, horrible plastic wheels so if you're serious about things see if you can replace the wheels. The plastic ones give a completely different (and much much worse) feel to skating.

Personally, I'd go for these over the adjustable £12 ones:
http://www.sportsdirect.com/airwalk-...-ladies-254023

Not brilliant but alright considering the price.
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Acidedge
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(Original post by kka25)
I'm planning to learn rollerblading and would want to invest some money to buy myself a good (novice) rollerblades; any tips on which would be the best investment, and how to actually start rollerblading?

I did learn it once but I was 9-10 years old at that time and I was no good at all :/ I went skating with some friends at Manchester last year and I was just dead awful; it was embarrassing!

So, maybe I could teach myself rollerblading on the grass lol I'm terrified of falling! :ninja: Any tips would be highly appreciated.

*Mods, don't know where to put this; so I think this is the best place to put it.
Ah, finally, a topic I'm an expert on!

We professionals use the term inline skates as Rollerblade is a brand name, i.e. all Rollerblades are inline skates but not all inline skates are rollerblades. But anyway, you'll want to invest in a decent pair of inline skates. I have covered the topic of what you need to know before buying a pair of inline skates in depth in this thread here. You’ll also want to invest in a good set of protective gear. There are some other useful threads I have written on that site, so feel free to read them and reply with any questions.

Once you have yourself kitted up with skates and pads, the best way to start learning is to have a lesson or two with a qualified instructor (like me). If you are in the East Midlands, then you’re nearby. Click on my signature for more details. If you live close to Manchester, then Leo at Flowskate (Google it) would be your nearest instructor. There are also a number of skate schools in London and on the south coast.

A couple of lessons to get the basics right is really useful. One of the first things we focus on is how to fall so you don’t hurt yourself, which is a common fear amongst new skaters, like yourself. You’ll also learn the primary skating skills, such as how to improve your balance on skates, as all new skaters start out a bit wobbly.

Once you’ve got the hang of the basics, further lessons will help you develop faster. Another option is to spend time with watching other skaters. If you can make it to Nottingham, the NottinghamSkaters have a meetup every Saturday afternoon, which you are welcome to attend.
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Acidedge
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(Original post by kka25)
Owh, no : ( Why not on the grass? lol; then maybe I should just try it in my room first?

Would it still hurt (a lot) if you fell, even if you were the shin pads?
Starting on the grass is, in fact, a good idea and where I start with my students. You want to start on a high-friction surface (grass, carpet) to get used to moving about in skates and to practice the basics. Whilst it is possible to roll on grass with enough momentum, skating on grass is indeed difficult (but not impossible )
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Acidedge
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(Original post by Scoobiedoobiedo)
When you say rollerblades, do you mean recreational rollerblades or inline skates?
(Original post by kka25)
I can't tell the differences
As I posted above, rollerblades and inline skates are the same thing. Recreational is one of the various (and most basic) skating disciplines. There are a whole variety of skating disciplines and skates will can be optimised to fit those disciplines. Other examples include: speed, artistic, freestyle, aggressive, hockey, roller derby and so on.
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ipoop
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(Original post by Acidedge)
Ah, finally, a topic I'm an expert on!

We professionals use the term inline skates as Rollerblade is a brand name, i.e. all Rollerblades are inline skates but not all inline skates are rollerblades. But anyway, you'll want to invest in a decent pair of inline skates. I have covered the topic of what you need to know before buying a pair of inline skates in depth in this thread here. You’ll also want to invest in a good set of protective gear. There are some other useful threads I have written on that site, so feel free to read them and reply with any questions.

Once you have yourself kitted up with skates and pads, the best way to start learning is to have a lesson or two with a qualified instructor (like me). If you are in the East Midlands, then you’re nearby. Click on my signature for more details. If you live close to Manchester, then Leo at Flowskate (Google it) would be your nearest instructor. There are also a number of skate schools in London and on the south coast.

A couple of lessons to get the basics right is really useful. One of the first things we focus on is how to fall so you don’t hurt yourself, which is a common fear amongst new skaters, like yourself. You’ll also learn the primary skating skills, such as how to improve your balance on skates, as all new skaters start out a bit wobbly.

Once you’ve got the hang of the basics, further lessons will help you develop faster. Another option is to spend time with watching other skaters. If you can make it to Nottingham, the NottinghamSkaters have a meetup every Saturday afternoon, which you are welcome to attend.
All good points and tips but, should you not first teach your learners how to brake, using the heel brake? That's what I first learned/only learned, everything else just kind of fell into place as I practised more. Oh also learned later on how to downhill the hard way
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Acidedge
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(Original post by Sabertooth)
As for which skates to get, don't go for hockey skates like someone said they like - they have no break and you will need a break, they're also far more specialized than you need. Don't get size adjustable ones. And don't get those cheap ones with the plastic wheels, nothing worse than horrible plastic wheels. Make sure they have good ankle support, I can't stress that enough, they must be able to adjust the ankle to provide enough support - too little and skating's going to be harder. Have a look about and post a pair on here and either I or someone else will be able to tell you if the skates are ok.
Good advice there. It’s best to start with a pair of inline skates that have a heel brake, as stopping with a heel brake is undeniably the most effective way of stopping. That therefore rules out pretty much every type of skate other than recreational, freestyle and fitness. We pros tend to lean towards freestyle skates as they allow you to try pretty much any skating discipline and the rigid shell results in better power distribution. And yes, avoid all skates that fall in to the category of “cheap and nasty plastic rubbish”. If you want to find out if the skates you’re thinking of buying fall in to that category, just ask (but the fact that you’re asking means they probably are).


(Original post by Sabertooth)
If you're worried about pain, make sure you protect yourself. You can get knee, elbow and wrist pads in a set for quite cheap, also wear a helmet, ok you won't look cool but being safe is better than being cool. It is very easy to have both feet slip out from under you on skates and if you fall straight on your head that's a big, big problem.
Darn right. Always best to pad up when you’re new to this.


(Original post by Sabertooth)
Skating is easy, anyone can do it - I taught my incredibly uncoordinated girlfriend how to skate in just a few sessions. It's great exercise and it's fantastic fun. You could try looking on the internet for guidance, youtube videos or something like that could probably show you the basics.
Yay!

Yes, anyone can learn to skate. If you can walk unaided, you skate, no matter how unstable you feel at the beginning.
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Acidedge
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(Original post by ipoop)
All good points and tips but, should you not first teach your learners how to brake, using the heel brake? That's what I first learned/only learned, everything else just kind of fell into place as I practised more. Oh also learned later on how to downhill the hard way
Oh yes indeed, and I do! My first lesson with anyone always covers the following, usually in this order: rules of the road, safety basics, how to fall and get up again safely, the primary skills, how to go, how to stop (with the heel brake) and how to turn.
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ipoop
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(Original post by Acidedge)
Oh yes indeed, and I do! My first lesson with anyone always covers the following, usually in this order: rules of the road, safety basics, how to fall and get up again safely, the primary skills, how to go, how to stop (with the heel brake) and how to turn.
One tip (if you do not already tell this to your learners) "It does not matter if people laugh at you when you fall down, if they laguh then they obviously don;y know how to skate and think it is easy as it looks) I sure learned quick, not feeling self conscious about falling down.
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kka25
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(Original post by Acidedge)
x
I'm sooooooooo going to read all of your posts one by one after this! :woo:

Thank you!
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Acidedge
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(Original post by kka25)
I'm sooooooooo going to read all of your posts one by one after this! :woo:

Thank you!
You're welcome. Let me know if you want to join us for lessons / our weekly meetup.
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